36 posts in this topic

On the chart it shows speed for dd3 as 1066mhz... and ddr4 being 2133Mhz. The ram I have now is already 2133mhz ? Do I understand it wrong or what?

 

Nothing wrong. You have these speeds now, except at a rather high voltage of 1.65V.

Well, apart from the fact that any DDR technically runs at half of their advertised clock and all these are MT/s, but they don't mentioned anywhere, because NUMBARRS!

 

 

 

I fear it is more a case of want than need.

There's never enough for enterprise, no doubt about that.

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Nothing wrong. You have these speeds now, except at a rather high voltage of 1.65V.

Well, apart from the fact that any DDR technically runs at half of their advertised clock and all these are MT/s, but they don't mentioned anywhere, because NUMBARRS!

 

 

I fear it is more a case of want than need.

There's never enough for enterprise, no doubt about that.

 

hehehe, at home, wanting 32GB in a Mini-ITX is want. More memory density in the enterprise is need, then it will be want. We won't just use less slots, we'll run more VMs in that space. We're paying for DDR3, we'll pay less, or simply get more in the same space with DDR4 plus lower power consumption.

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Nothing wrong. You have these speeds now, except at a rather high voltage of 1.65V.

Well, apart from the fact that any DDR technically runs at half of their advertised clock and all these are MT/s, but they don't mentioned anywhere, because NUMBARRS!

 

Ah riiiight, always wondered why in some programs it still shows as 1066Mhz each.. strange. Thanks for the info :)

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The graphs on page 1 are useless. The are showing 800mhz ddr2 and 1066mhz ddr3 and they are using really old games. AMD's processors show significant performance increase with faster memory, intel doesn't. DDR3 goes from 1066-2933mhz, ddr4 starts at 2133mhz which is a nice improvement over the 1333mhz and 1600mhz which are the most common ddr3 used in pc's and laptops today. The voltage of ddr3 started at around 1.8v or so originally but nowadays most ddr3 memory is 1.5-1.65v and there are some that are 1.35v. DDR4 starts off at just 1.2v and will go lower over time. This lower voltage can signifcantly reduce power consumption of your computer which is very important to laptops.D

 

DDR4 also has lots of protocol improvements such as CRC checks on the data bus etc: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR4_SDRAM

 

DDR4 is a very nice improvement over DDR3. It will be 2yrs or so until ddr4 is reasonably priced i suspect based on previous ddr memory prices by then i suspect that 2800mhz and other fast speeds will be commonplace.

 

Here are some ddr3 gaming graphs of amd and intel processors in games from september 2013: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/memory-scaling-gaming-haswell-richland,3593-11.html

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I can see it now: DDR4 motherboards that cost twice as much as their DDR3 counterparts just because 4>3.

In Portugal? Yeap.

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From what I understand, although there are a slight performance improvement the main improvements come in the area of power consumption which will mainly benefit tablet and laptop users - I guess server vendors as well since it helps with cooling too.

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Lower voltage is nice.

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^but will it also use lower amperage ?

as power consumption = voltage * amperage

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^but will it also use lower amperage ?

as power consumption = voltage * amperage

 

decreasing either variable without increasing the other will result in reduction in power consumption.

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decreasing either variable without increasing the other will result in reduction in power consumption.

yeah, but the article said nowhere about the amperage requirements...

take Graphic Cards for example, modern graphic cards use much lower voltage than ancient ISA graphics cards,

but its known fact that you might require larger power supplies to keep such modern graphic cards working.

again, theres no mention if the new DDR4 will use the same amperage as existing DDR3.

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yeah, but the article said nowhere about the amperage requirements...

take Graphic Cards for example, modern graphic cards use much lower voltage than ancient ISA graphics cards,

but its known fact that you might require larger power supplies to keep such modern graphic cards working.

again, theres no mention if the new DDR4 will use the same amperage as existing DDR3.

 

Fair enough. But unless the amperage increased enough to cancel the benefits of lower voltage, or theoretically enough to actually increase power consumption, by doubling the density in the same area of silicon you're going to still significantly reduce the power consumption. Unless of course, like most, you simply do twice as much and keep all the slots full and have twice the capacity.

 

The density is where it's at. Laptops\Ultras with 1 stick instead of two for 8GB. At home, I probably won't go for it as there's really no reason to upgrade my 3770k/GTX 760 other than memory which I  really don't need 32GB on the desktop again, I just don't need VMs like I used to. And it's not worth the hassle or cost just to upgrade the motherboard (and CPU of course). It's a couple years away I suppose, but still a pretty good evolution. I'm not sure why so many have a negative attitude towards it.

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