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Arachno 1D

Can anybody translate a phrase to Latin for me please

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Im looking to translate the following to Latin if anybody can help please

 

By skill and strength during adverse events

 

I can put together the words but dont know if its grammatically correct

 

Lucror Ingenio et viribus per res adversae

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My latin is rusty, but why did you add Lucror? It means to gain or acquire, which isn't in the original English.

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Prudentia et fortitudine per adversos casus

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Typus theBy solers quod vires per adversarius vices

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Good start 3 translations completely different lol

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My latin is rusty, but why did you add Lucror? It means to gain or acquire, which isn't in the original English.

 

Sorry I was copying and pasting quotes so got a little befuddled

 

Lucror = win [in one sense]

 

So I guess I should have said 

 

Win by skill and strength during adverse events

 

But thanks to those who have answered so far much appreciated

 

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"skill" in the context of your phrase would be "usus"

"strength" in this case would likely be "vis vires"

"pessimus" means "worst" so "malus" might be more appropriate.

Latin is kinda weird and there are probably multiple ways to say what you're after. :)

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Mmm very confusing in a search I got

Ingenio et viribus - By skill and strength

 

and

 

Latin didn't have a true noun for 'adversity,' and the concept could be translated several ways. Most common

use in Latin was 'res adversae,' literally, 'adverse events.' Also used were 'res asperae

(difficult/bitter/harsh events),' 'adversum (the adjective used alone),' and 'calamitas (more lile English

calamity).' Realize that those words may have different endings when used in a sentence or phrase.
 

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How about

ingenio et fortitudine in arduo vincimus
(or vince, if you want an imperative)

 

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Sorry my Latin is limited to Google word search any chance you could translate for me please?

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No offence to the OP, but why do people think saying or translating something in a dead language gives it gravitas?

 

It's like when prayers are recited in church in Latin. No one knows wtf is being said.

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Hello,

"Who speaks Latin?" - Tony Stark

Best I could do is Google Translate :) Sorry.

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No offence to the OP, but why do people think saying or translating something in a dead language gives it gravitas?

Given the lack of context to the question, I don't think any of us can tell what the reasoning for asking was.

To arachnoid, I'm afraid I can't help. I didn't get forced in to learning Latin and never got round to doing it myself, sadly.

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No offence to the OP, but why do people think saying or translating something in a dead language gives it gravitas?

 None take it was merely something to add a quirk or attention grabber to a small project Im working on btw was that an unintentional pun [Latin gravitamacr.gifs]

 

Yes Google is the limit of my Latin too :D

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No offence to the OP, but why do people think saying or translating something in a dead language gives it gravitas?

 

I'm not sure if you being serious or ironic because gravitas is a Latin word :D

 

Latin is an ancient language which is still being used in science, medicine, and liturgy. It's also the official language of the state of Vatican. It's not dead.

 

It's like when prayers are recited in church in Latin. No one knows wtf is being said.

 

This applies only to the ignorant :D

 

The very purpose of using Latin (in church and eslewhere) is to use it so that people from different backgrounds could understand what is being said. (A German Catholic visitor would understand everything in a Catholic Church in Australia for example)

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Unintentional bit of irony there. But gravitas is a Latin word that is alive and well in the English language. My understanding is that a lot of English, being the stolen, bastard language it is, is derived from Latin.

 

People even tattoo phrases or quotes on themselves in Latin. Why? No one can read it. Must just be because Latin sounds kind of cool.

 

 

I'm not sure if you being serious or ironic because gravitas is a Latin word :D

 

Latin is an ancient language which is still being used in science, medicine, and liturgy. It's also the official language of the state of Vatican. It's not dead.

 

 

This applies only to the ignorant :D

 

The very purpose of using Latin (in church and eslewhere) is to use it so that people from different backgrounds could understand what is being said. (A German Catholic visitor would understand everything in a Catholic Church in Australia for example)

 

 

I suppose I meant dead as in no one speaks it as a language. It isn't updated with modern terms or ideas etc. Yeah, we might give a new bug a latin name or some horrible disease but that seems more like tradition to me more than anything else.

 

Sorry to derail the OP's thread. Someone help the OP out.

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Conjugate the verb.

 

Canis est in horto.

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