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Why make USB 2.0 ports in new motherboard?


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#16 +patseguin

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 10:42

That's a good question. I build my systems and I too have wondered why they bother with both USB 2 and 3.


#17 +goretsky

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 02:19

Hello,

 

eSATA has lower CPU utilization, since it does not have to go through a SATA to USB protocol conversion.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky



#18 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 02:30

Hello,

 

eSATA has lower CPU utilization, since it does not have to go through a SATA to USB protocol conversion.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

 

That is a fair point I never even thought about.



#19 sc302

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 02:30

Why exactly? Both have sufficiently high theoretical maximums that no mechanical drive is going to reach those speeds and USB 3.0 has backwards compatibility with USB 2.0 ports which are ubiquitous. I'm not really sure there is any advantage to esata*. I imagine esata is going to die the same death as firewire (and thunderbolt probably will also). Not being ubiquitous relegates you to niche markets at the end of the day -- you never really die but you live in twilight.

*Assuming you don't have broken USB 3.0 support that is.

Esata is about as direct as you can get. It will go up in speed as your sata goes up in speed. In some cases it is just a converter cable to convert sata to esata. The down side is that cable/port is all data, no power to run the drive. As ssd drives bring us closer to the limits of the ports, I want it as fast as I can get it and esata is a bit faster.

I do like the convenience of usb powered drives. Besides with the right controller, you can do a hardware raid off of one esta port and the right enclosure, try doing that with usb.

They do make devices like lacie and drobo that support multiple disks and connect via usb, they also have a built in os to handle the drives, formatting, and partitioning. The esata does this with much less expensive enclosures and is much more direct than dealing with a lacie or drobo.

#20 Raa

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 02:34

Some USB3 controllers (even integrated ones) don't play nice either in BIOS/EFI, or pre OS load, rendering them useless when trying to install Windows, for example.



#21 The_Observer

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 02:48

I would personally rather esata

 

USB3 is far better that eSata imho, main reason is that i can power my USB3 2.5" drive on the one cable. 



#22 +CrossCheck

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:05

what i wanna know is why is there still an antiquated PS2 port. geez some boards still have a standard pci slot.



#23 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:07

Esata is about as direct as you can get. It will go up in speed as your sata goes up in speed. In some cases it is just a converter cable to convert sata to esata. The down side is that cable/port is all data, no power to run the drive. As ssd drives bring us closer to the limits of the ports, I want it as fast as I can get it and esata is a bit faster.

I do like the convenience of usb powered drives. Besides with the right controller, you can do a hardware raid off of one esta port and the right enclosure, try doing that with usb.

They do make devices like lacie and drobo that support multiple disks and connect via usb, they also have a built in os to handle the drives, formatting, and partitioning. The esata does this with much less expensive enclosures and is much more direct than dealing with a lacie or drobo.

 

I suppose it is a fair point that if you hit the limit that esata will be faster here. Did you see the SATA 3.2 revisions? I saw them the other day (I forget where). I'm wondering where they leave esata. I didn't know that esata enclosures were less expensive; money is always a good reason to go for those instead ;-)



#24 The_Observer

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:07

what i wanna know is why is there still an antiquated PS2 port. geez some boards still have a standard pci slot.

 

LOl this is true, and what about serial ports and PS2 ports, time to drop them all and move on! Lets live in the future dam it!



#25 sc302

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:09

USB3 is far better that eSata imho, main reason is that i can power my USB3 2.5" drive on the one cable.

As I said that is the one advantage I like. Great for memsticks and pocket drives.
I end up using more usb2 than usb 3. The 3 ports are usually in a very inconvenient spot which requires me crawling on the ground to reach when going from computer to computer.

#26 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:16

Some USB3 controllers (even integrated ones) don't play nice either in BIOS/EFI, or pre OS load, rendering them useless when trying to install Windows, for example.

 

Interesting insight. You'd think they would just operate as USB 2.0 ports without the USB 3.0 drivers loaded. From googling briefly it sounds like many just don't function without the USB 3.0 drivers being loaded in the OS. Definitely a good reason to keep a USB 2.0 controller and ports on board.



#27 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:17

what i wanna know is why is there still an antiquated PS2 port. geez some boards still have a standard pci slot.

 

PS2 port is for the Model M ;-)



#28 Anibal P

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 03:19

PS2 port is for the Model M ;-)

 

Also lots of gamers using good mechanical keyboards still use PS2 because of n-key rollover 



#29 PGHammer

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 04:07

A manufacturer can diversify their product line up this way and charge progressively more as they put more USB 3.0 ports inside. It's all marketing and profit maximization.

Actually, there's a more SENSIBLE reason - it's called "backward compatibility".  (It's also why USB 1.1 ports held on even after the USB 2.0 specification was not only finalized, but supported natively by motherboard chipsets; Intel's own G31 - Bear Lake - and successor G41 - Eagle Lake - both support two USB 1.1 ports, in addition to the USB 2.0 ports.)  Not everyone wants to run the latest and greatest OS - even on a new motherboard.  I'm talking Linux distributions - not Windows.