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#1 riahc3

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 09:53

Hello,
 
From a beast, we go to a wimp...
 
Im seeing my company is talking about replacing a aging XP system and that XP system is mostly used for Excel and our accountant's other needs. So basically it needs nothing. Building it piece by piece I dont see it worth it so what company (Dell, HP, etc) makes best bang for buck?

At best, Ill problably replace its internal HDD with a SSD and maybe upgrade its RAM. But besides that I dont see anything else.

As a treat :p I think we should get our accountant a good mouse and keyboard (no mechanical crap that can be listened to thruout the entire small office) so palms are well rested. Any recommendations on that?

Found, for 399€ from Dell:

Intel® Core™ i3-4130 (dual core, 3 MB cache, 3,40 GHz, HD 2500 graphics card)
Windows 7 Professional
4 GB SDRAM DDR3 a 1600 MHz
500 GB SATA 3,5" (7200 rpm)

Thanks


#2 Kenji

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 10:08

Why not build it? you can save a few €. took me a couple of mins to put this together.

 

 
CPU:  Intel Pentium G2020 2.9GHz Dual-Core Processor  (€48.46 @ Amazon Espana) 
Motherboard:  ASRock B75M-GL R2.0 Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard  (€51.48 @ Amazon Espana) 
Memory:  Patriot Signature 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory  (€34.06 @ Amazon Espana) 
Storage:  Corsair Neutron Series 64GB 2.5" Solid State Disk  (€74.20 @ Amazon Espana) 
Total: €263.18
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-04 11:06 CET+0100)


#3 OP riahc3

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 10:15

Hello,

Why not build it? you can save a few €. took me a couple of mins to put this together.
 
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
 
CPU:  Intel Pentium G2020 2.9GHz Dual-Core Processor  (€48.46 @ Amazon Espana) 
Motherboard:  ASRock B75M-GL R2.0 Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard  (€51.48 @ Amazon Espana) 
Memory:  Patriot Signature 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1333 Memory  (€34.06 @ Amazon Espana) 
Storage:  Corsair Neutron Series 64GB 2.5" Solid State Disk  (€74.20 @ Amazon Espana) 
Case:  Cooler Master Elite 350 ATX Mid Tower Case w/500W Power Supply  (€54.98 @ Amazon Espana) 
Total: €263.18
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-12-04 11:06 CET+0100)

+ Windows 7 Professional 126,62 €

389,80 €

For 10 € more, I get a i3....

#4 Kenji

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 10:21

Hello,
+ Windows 7 Professional 126,62 €

389,80 €

For 10 € more, I get a i3....

I guess so. But then you say that you want to upgrade to an SSD, add an extra €75 for that.



#5 sc302

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 16:15

I guess so. But then you say that you want to upgrade to an SSD, add an extra €75 for that.

Yes and then there is the warranty from one location, drivers from one location.  He doesn't need to track down sites and receipts if he looses them to invoke the warranty process, he doesn't have to find drivers from a dozen or so sites to reload windows.  For 75 you have added convenience and the ability to standardize across the board if he so chooses later on.  IMO, dell is hard to beat on price....and if you setup a b2b with them their prices get a bit better than on the site dealing with a sales rep.  No one in a medium to a enterprise level environment builds computers...why is that?  because they have money to burn or is it to simply standardize across the board and to be able to spend time building custom images vs custom pcs and images?  It costs a lot more for a company to build a computer than it is to image a computer.



#6 +BudMan

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 16:39

It does not make sense for a company to build their own machines, unless it was the smallest of the smallest of shops. Or if they needed something really custom for some special use.

For day to day office use, pick a standard build and everyone gets the same exact machine. This is easier to manage, simple to create install images for, easier to troubleshoot for known bugs or issues. If you run into something on one machine since same install, same hardware you will have the fix for all of them, etc. Easier to keep the user up an running, because it very simple to have a spare machine or spare parts laying around that are all standard.

If machine fails, you give him the spare and there is no change for the user since it is a standard build.

If you have users with varying computer needs, say your engineers need more ram, better graphics, etc. Then you just create a different standard for that level of machine.

Maybe its the same model, just with a I7 vs I3, more ram different graphics card, etc.

Building out of your garage lets call it, does not fit any sort of business model at all even if could save a few bucks on parts. And yes once you pick the company you want to go with - I would look into what they offer for relationships with small businesses.

#7 primexx

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 22:22

I've only heard great things about mechanical switches, but haven't tried any of the recent ones so I don't know if they really live up to the hype. Assuming they're the greatest, the next best would be keyboards with high quality scissor switches like the ones in most laptops.

 

2AuBNWH.jpg

 

they're slim (less travel distance) and very comfortable. although it appears that a lot of scissor switch keyboards are chicklet-style, which imo is godawful to type on.

 

There are lots of scissor switch keyboards from lesser known brands, not so much from namebrands. Logitech's PerfectStroke keyboards are pretty decent (I just got one), you can take a look: http://www.logitech....s/articles/5912

 

I believe Microsoft's new Sculpt keyboards are scissor switch too, but I think most of theirs are rubber domed (used to have one). http://www.microsoft...en-us/keyboards



#8 OP riahc3

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 22:37

Hello,

It does not make sense for a company to build their own machines, unless it was the smallest of the smallest of shops. Or if they needed something really custom for some special use.

For day to day office use, pick a standard build and everyone gets the same exact machine. This is easier to manage, simple to create install images for, easier to troubleshoot for known bugs or issues. If you run into something on one machine since same install, same hardware you will have the fix for all of them, etc. Easier to keep the user up an running, because it very simple to have a spare machine or spare parts laying around that are all standard.

If machine fails, you give him the spare and there is no change for the user since it is a standard build.

If you have users with varying computer needs, say your engineers need more ram, better graphics, etc. Then you just create a different standard for that level of machine.

Maybe its the same model, just with a I7 vs I3, more ram different graphics card, etc.

Building out of your garage lets call it, does not fit any sort of business model at all even if could save a few bucks on parts. And yes once you pick the company you want to go with - I would look into what they offer for relationships with small businesses.

Are you trying to take over Neowin? :p

Jokes aside, most of our PCs are Dells but Im willing to pitch in something else if its better.

#9 Mindovermaster

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 22:39

Hello,
Are you trying to take over Neowin? :p

Jokes aside, most of our PCs are Dells but Im willing to pitch in something else if its better.

 

You're talking to BudMan. You better read carefully what he says.



#10 Praetor

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Posted 04 December 2013 - 22:41

building a computer for a business? what for?

 

buying a pre-made from Dell, Lenovo, HP and others will give you:

- OEM version of Windows costs less then Retail.

- Extended warranty and central (one OEM, not multiple OEM involved) and depending from which OEM you chose you can even get 4 hours on site replacement like Dell and HP does.

- equal computers for everyone means better support, less costs with different builds and less downtime if you need a different part but it's unavailable. If someone want's more memory, SSD or better CPU just upgrade the machine. simple.

 

Buying pre-made computers will cost less, not more. The hidden cost of building your own computer is:

- You are the one that builds it and completely support all the hardware and warranty, so you are costing time for those tasks.

- Time consuming looking for warranties from different parts.

- Add the retail windows version of Windows and the few euros you saved from building those machines goes out in the wind.

 

Also: do you have Volume licensing for Windows? If yes then you can even save buy not buying a pre-made with Windows installed, ask a quote for that.

 

edit: ah Budman as said a lot of what I've said, I'm 6 hours late in this thread :/



#11 OP riahc3

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 11:01

Hello,

Like I said, Ive been asked to do this (saw it coming from miles)

Currently it seems the current PC has 300GB (using 59GB :laugh: ) I think a 256 GB SSD is more than enough. We dont need this for top performace but a good SSD is nice. What is your recommendation? (or should I make a new thread for this)

Thank you

#12 68k

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 11:20

I'd go for a small form factor unit, like a ThinkCentre M Series Tiny Desktop:

http://shopap.lenovo...nkcentre/tinys/

 

Quiet, (very) power efficient, space saving, and (reasonably) low cost.



#13 cork1958

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 11:24

As said by budman:

"It does not make sense for a company to build their own machines, unless it was the smallest of the smallest of shops. Or if they needed something really custom for some special use"

 

Nuff said, right there! :)

 

I think I would prefer Dell computers over HP.



#14 OP riahc3

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 11:24

Hello,

We have been offered this:

OptiPlex 3020 Minitower BTX
Intel Core i3-4130 Processor (Dual Core, 3MB Cache, 3.40 GHz, w/HD4400 Graphics) OptiPlex 3020
Minitower Chassis with Standard Power Supply
4GB (1x4GB) Non-ECC DDR3 1600MHz SDRAM Memory
500GB 3.5inch Serial ATA (7.200 Rpm) Hard Drive
Minitower Chassis Mainstream Heatsink (65watts)
16X Half Height DVD+/-RW Drive PowerDVD Software not included European Power Cord
Chassis Intrusion Switch
Intel Integrated Graphics,OptiPlex Internal Dell Business Audio Speaker No Bcom required
Dell™ MS111 USB Optical Mouse
Keyboard : Spanish (QWERTY) Dell KB212-B QuietKey USB Keyboard Black
Dell Backup and Recovery Manager Basic for Windows 8

Total: 482,79 €

I see it as a good offer :)

#15 Buzz99

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 11:41

Is there any extended warraty with that ? On-site service ? You should also look for this, like 3 year On-Site warranty and repair. Could save you lots of troubles...I'm also not sure that SSD is recommended in a business environement, Mechanical HD tend to be more reliable.