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Possible reversal in Oracle v Google

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#16 The_Decryptor

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 14:08

So whom do you think should win this ######?


Well Google already lost on the actual code claims (The rangeCheck function, which Oracle claimed was super important, but everybody else realised it wasn't, and the unit tests), what they're fighting over now is whether or not you can copyright an API, which I think is a terrible idea and shouldn't happen.

A copyrighted API isn't covering the code itself (That already can be copyrighted), what we're talking about then is copyrighting how the code is invoked.

Edit: If I have a REST API for a web service, does that mean I can copyright certain URLs? etc.


#17 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 23:44

^ That RangeCheck function was pathetic. That's pretty much how ANYone writes a bloody range check function so claiming copyright on that is just ######.



#18 Growled

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:36

Edit: If I have a REST API for a web service, does that mean I can copyright certain URLs? etc.

 

According to Oracle, yes.



#19 greenwizard88

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 05:09

Edit: If I have a REST API for a web service, does that mean I can copyright certain URLs? etc.

But the thing is, if you have a website, the content of the URL is already copyrighted. So functionally, there's no difference between a REST API and a URL.