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WiTricity (wireless electric power) breaking out

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Imagine a home or business where you didn't have to plug anything in - electric power would be transmitted to lights, electronics and appliances wirelessly like WiFi transmits a data connection. That tech is now here as WiTricity.

People make the mistake of comparing WiTricity to a coreless transformer which uses induction to move comparatively small currents, but WiTricity uses resonance to move milliwatts to kilowatts.

How-it-works.jpg

Home: http://www.witricity.com/index.html

WiTricity info sheet @FDA: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/MedicalDevices/NewsEvents/WorkshopsConferences/UCM364551.pdf

Intel / Foxconn investments: http://www.xconomy.com/boston/2013/10/23/witricitys-wireless-power-tech-attracts-25m-intel-foxconn/

Wireless charging for electric cars (imagine if it were in the roadbed - no more range anxiety):

http://m.spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/green-tech/advanced-cars/toyota-licenses-wireless-charging-tech-from-witricity

You drive home in your electric car, enter your garage, and step out the car holding your briefcase in one hand and groceries in the other. Wouldn't it be nice if you could charge the car without physically plugging in?

Toyota thinks so. Wireless power startup WiTricity announced yesterday that Toyota has licensed inductive charging technology from the MIT spin-off and that the carmaker will build wireless power capture devices into future vehicles. Toyota invested in WiTricity two years ago.

The idea of wireless charging isn't new: GM?s ill-fated EV1 was charged using an inductive paddle. And although wireless charging for EVs or consumer electronics is far from commonplace, advances in the past decade show that the technology is maturing and that manufacturers are committed to building it into their products.

Earlier this year, Satoshi Ogiso?one of the engineers who headed development of the first Prius?said Toyota will begin verifying a wireless power charging system next year in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. Nissan, which makes the all-electric Leaf, is working on a wireless charging system and told reporters last year that it intends to offer it as an option in a 2015 model year Infiniti. Daimler and Volvo are also working on wireless charging and Bosch already sells a wireless charging system for the Leaf and Chevy Volt.

One of the major companies in inductive charging infrastructure is Qualcomm, which acquired wireless vehicle charging technology from London-based HaloIPT two years ago. Now called Qualcomm?s Halo division, the company intends to run a trial in London with wireless charging pads on parking spots and cars equipped with sensors to indicate they are aligned above the charging pad. The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) is running a trial where electric buses are charged while on the move from wireless pads embedded in the road ways.

Inductive charging works by transferring electric power from a transmitter coil to a nearby coupled device, such as a car or phone. When current flows through the coil, it produces a magnetic field. That field induces a flow of electric current on a coil on a receiving device. (For more on the technical challenges of the technology, read "A Critical Look at Wireless Power").

The auto industry association SAE International last month agreed on a frequency range and three power transfer rates for wireless electric vehicle charging. That sets the stage for development of interoperable charging products from different providers.

For WiTricity, the Toyota licensing deal follows an investment in October from Intel?s venture arm, Intel Capital, and contract manufacturer Foxconn. It takes automakers years to build new components, such as a wireless receiver, into their vehicles. But consumer electronics companies are likely to incorporate wireless power into their products sooner, said WiTricity CEO Eric Giler.

WiTricity has already built a prototype of a phone with a wireless receiver built into it. When placed near a laptop with a transmitter coil, the phone charges. ?Intel is quite keen to get this into portable devices. If that happens, it?s a reason to get the latest and greatest devices,? Giler said. ?Seeing these things in the market in the next 12 to 18 months is entirely realistic.?

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My gawd this would be so freakin' awesome... Provided you don't end up with brain cancer or something  :rofl:

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Neither magnets or electricity cause cancer.

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they can however cause ionization, which might damage DNA and such damage can possibly causing cancer.

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High power RF, microwaves, UV, x-rays and gamma rays can ionize, but WiTricity cannot.

I can see this being put into new and upgraded construction once comparable devices & appliances, WiFi connected lighting (Philips Hue etc.), and converters for legacy devices become commonplace. The Hue etc. lights are cool as you can control them with a phone app.

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Neither magnets or electricity cause cancer.

 

'twas a joke.

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Neither magnets or electricity cause cancer.

 

Tell that to the sailors aboard the USS Eldridge

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Tell that to the sailors aboard the USS Eldridge

 

Navy vessels have Radar systems which have high power RF and microwave transmissions.

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Navy vessels have Radar systems which have high power RF and microwave transmissions.

Pretty sure he was referring to the teleportation/invisibility experiments that "supposedly" happened on board it.

I mean, it's pretty obvious that was actually caused by the reptilians who run the NWO.

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Tesla is probably rolling in his grave (with the aliens he spoke to I bet!) about this. 100 years or so it took them to even remotely come up with something similar to the system he invented back around 1900 or so (since he never took notes, no one was able to reproduce his supposed wireless electric transmitter technology).

 

Go go Tesla power.

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I could easily see this being implemented in road beds and parking spaces, with remote metering of use. Bye-bye to the need for huge EV batteries, and most liquid fuels.

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I could easily see this being implemented in road beds and parking spaces, with remote metering of use. Bye-bye to the need for huge EV batteries, and most liquid fuels.

Its not going to be powerful enough to charge a car or a fridge or an air conditioner etc...  We will still need power run in our homes.

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Using the WiTricity WiT-3300 electric vehicle charging system as an example,

1) they can already do "car"

2) it can deliver 350-400 volts at from 300-3,300 watts, depending on vehicle requirements

Are you still saying that is insufficient for a refrigerator, AC or other low kilowatt classappliance?

http://www.witricity.com/pages/ev-charging-system.html

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Using the WiTricity WiT-3300 electric vehicle charging system as an example,

1) they can already do "car"

2) it can deliver 350-400 volts at from 300-3,300 watts, depending on vehicle requirements

Are you still saying that is insufficient for a refrigerator, AC or other low kilowatt classappliance?

http://www.witricity.com/pages/ev-charging-system.html

 

AC is low kilowatt range ? my heatpump/AC surely do not fall into that category, even though it's the most economic way to keep heat (well until outside hits -20 anyway, then it needs help). I believe it's in the slightly above 1KW range, though I'm not sure, it's a big 9kw model or so, so it' might be more, that's still a good one third of the max capacity for Witricity, add in some other 500-1000W devices and you're maxing. 

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Seeing these things in the market in the next 12 to 18 months is entirely realistic.?

 

I'd like to see that happen. I suppose one could then 'share' electricity wirelessly? That'd be cool.

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AC is low kilowatt range?

Low kilowatt meaning single digits. Less than 10 kWh.

Our central air draws 5,000 watts. Room AC, even the built-in units, are much less and a lot of people use them. Then you have the dry climate swamp coolers which can use only 15-20% the power draw of AC.

I also find it difficult to believe the 3,300 watt capacity of their EV charger is a dead end capacity, especially if the emitter coil is large. The car chargers emitter is only 50x50 cm.

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Neither magnets or electricity cause cancer.

 

That may be true but surely it could have some negative health effects. I would like that to be researched before we jumped too heavily into this.

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That may be true but surely it could have some negative health effects. I would like that to be researched before we jumped too heavily into this.

The only thing I can think of is laziness

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That may be true but surely it could have some negative health effects. I would like that to be researched before we jumped too heavily into this.

Considering that we live on a giant magnet, that orbits an even bigger one, I think it's probably too late for that.

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Considering that we live on a giant magnet, that orbits an even bigger one, I think it's probably too late for that.

 

That is true but we know that there are additional health risks from living near high voltage power lines. Too much electricity is not a good thing.

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I had this idea and was going to do it as a college project 10 years ago, on a more inductive 'cell charging pad' level that exists now rather than 3kV scale, my main goal was to make it work over long distances.. Back in the early 2000s cells like AA and AAA were quite common in CD players. Now nearly everything is rechargable. When I told my friends about 'wireless power' everyone laughed at me and said, you mean batteries? they claim it wasn't possible, said it wasn't safe and would cause cancers and that it was a bad idea. Maybe it was ahead of its time then, but personally I'm glad this technology is making it to market even if I never bothered persuing it. I'm pretty sure its gonna be huge.

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Power lines operate at much higher voltages (35,000v to 230,000v). WiTricity doesn't.

Also, some studies point towards the tree growth controls and herbicides used in power line right of ways as the cause of many of the reported health issues.

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That is true but we know that there are additional health risks from living near high voltage power lines. Too much electricity is not a good thing.

Are there though? People say the same thing about cell towers but that's nonsense.

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Are there though? People say the same thing about cell towers but that's nonsense.

 

it's never been proven and the people that claim they're "electric sensitive" or whatever they call it over there and are supposedly allergic to electricity and signal. have yet to actually prove it. put them in a supposedly shielded room and tell them it's clean and they say they're fine, put them in a perfectly shielded room and tell them it's full of signals and they're bad. never mind some of these people build shelters around electronics in their homes from thin fiber board.... 

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I had this idea and was going to do it as a college project 10 years ago, on a more inductive 'cell charging pad' level that exists now rather than 3kV scale, my main goal was to make it work over long distances.. Back in the early 2000s cells like AA and AAA were quite common in CD players. Now nearly everything is rechargable. When I told my friends about 'wireless power' everyone laughed at me and said, you mean batteries? they claim it wasn't possible, said it wasn't safe and would cause cancers and that it was a bad idea. Maybe it was ahead of its time then, but personally I'm glad this technology is making it to market even if I never bothered persuing it. I'm pretty sure its gonna be huge.

 

I wonder if you could build a witricity receiver in the shape of 2,3 or 4 AA or AAA batteries to put into devices

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