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Irony of my fake christmas tree

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#1 Atomic Wanderer Chicken

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 22:47

I have had my fake Christmas tree in my family for over 10 years. We got it because it was more convenient than having to get a real tree yearly and water it etc.. Recently our fake Christmas has begun shedding its fake plastic/nylon pine needles.  So much for having a fake Christmas tree :laugh:




#2 jakem1

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 22:49

Mine started doing that last year :laugh:



#3 Steve B.

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 22:50

You'll still find that artificial trees throw bits everywhere just as much as real ones do. The only real benefit is that you don't need to have a full planter for an artitificial one.



#4 Growled

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:45

We got an artificial tree this year, first time ever. It sure is nice not to have to water the darn tree every day.



#5 Tager

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 01:50

I haven't bought a real Christmas tree since I've owned a dog. :angry:



#6 +Phouchg

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 11:45

Why woud you water the real tree, though? I don't remember doing that and they're always been fine... for several weeks, then shedding starts, which is a good indicator it is already way past time to have it removed. Does it, perhaps, look better, like, more fresh, if watered? Can't really appreciate it anyway behind all that shiny stuff thrown onto it, I'm afraid.



#7 Co_Co

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 18:39

you gotta water that thing, it dries up prematurely. if you want a tree to last 2-3 weeks and not end-up as a pile 

 

i water it and the thing drinks up litres every night



#8 Gotenks98

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 18:50

Most of my life we had real trees when I was a kid. It wasn't until I was an adult that my parents found out I was allergic to real trees. I spent so many Christmas's sick or in the ER due to this. Had they'd known we would have gotten fake trees. :cry:



#9 Dubstep Nixon

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 18:54

Why woud you water the real tree, though? I don't remember doing that and they're always been fine... for several weeks, then shedding starts, which is a good indicator it is already way past time to have it removed. Does it, perhaps, look better, like, more fresh, if watered? Can't really appreciate it anyway behind all that shiny stuff thrown onto it, I'm afraid.

 

If the tree dries out the needles will start turning brown and ugly, but more importantly it's a major fire hazard.

 

Have you ever seen a dead, dried out Christmas tree go up in flames? 

 

 

 

Scary.



#10 +Phouchg

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 23:09

It might come into play that we usually get the tree only a week before the actual date and directly from the forest (which is, I reckon, something not everyone can do), but there must be some other factors, I tell you. I'd guess dry air, high room temperature and bright lights, which all may confuse the tree into "thinking" that it's spring, for starters. Afaik, water is mostly used for transporting stuff, which, if you don't change the soil (or don't even have any), isn't there. Otherwise, the tree shall not cease to live for quite some time, it has its reserves for these reasons exactly - to keep itself alive through several months of winter when every drop of water up to one foot deep might be frozen.

 

Fire, on the other hand, requires a bit of common sense, namely, everything can go up in flames if left unattended. And so just don't leave it unattended, don't let candles burn down in their holders and place the tree itself in an easily accessible place instead of putting it in the very corner, packed between furniture, like in that video - dammit, people!?

 

Scotch pine is a different sort of tree, but I can't really imagine that sort of fire going on without other things going up first and that'd be decorations. People burn juniper twigs intentionally, it takes several seconds before it starts. Sparks from crackling needles will sooner light up paper or rug nearby, but the twig itself will resist.



#11 episode

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 23:15

Why woud you water the real tree, though? I don't remember doing that and they're always been fine... for several weeks, then shedding starts, which is a good indicator it is already way past time to have it removed. Does it, perhaps, look better, like, more fresh, if watered? Can't really appreciate it anyway behind all that shiny stuff thrown onto it, I'm afraid.

 

Yes, you should keep water in the stand. Especially if you have lights on it. (Non-LEDs, anyway) - dead tree + heat = fire.



#12 +Phouchg

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 23:41

Our USSR-made 220 volt non-LEDs should've burned down the whole microdistrict many times over then. Good then that they don't work for many years now because of being connected in series - when one burns out, it needs to be rewired and nobody wants to bother - we have LEDs proudly "made in Germany" (riiight) now, but it's a piece of nostalgia so we keep it around. I swear, people have become...



#13 firey

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 23:58

this is the first year I have ever had a real tree.  Seems pretty simple.. and now the whole livingroom smells like a forest.  The stand holds a tonne of water, so I'll just keep it and the resevoir filled and should be good to go.



#14 +Phouchg

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:09

this is the first year I have ever had a real tree.  Seems pretty simple.. and now the whole livingroom smells like a forest.  The stand holds a tonne of water, so I'll just keep it and the resevoir filled and should be good to go.

The Roof, the roof is on fire, we don't need no water let the **********er burn, burn **********er burn! :shiftyninja:



#15 MikeChipshop

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:42

If the tree dries out the needles will start turning brown and ugly, but more importantly it's a major fire hazard.

 

Have you ever seen a dead, dried out Christmas tree go up in flames? 

 

 

 

Scary.

 

Threw our old Christmas tree on a bonfire after last Christmas and damn thing put the fire out.





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