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Heat concerns about the new Mac Pro's design

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#91 Brian M.

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 21:06

Yes, you can put a 680 in because someone made a Mac edition 680. All the same, you're limited to graphic cards that are supported in OSX, and you can never replaced the motherboard and CPU but keep everything else like you can in a BYO PC.
 
As I said, it's upgradeable enough, but it's not limitless like a BYOPC.


We didn't dig that far into it - but the CPU is probably socketed and can be upgraded.

The old Mac Pro CPUs were socketed, as are the (old) iMacs (dunno about the new ones).


#92 xWhiplash

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 01:43

Yes, you can put a 680 in because someone made a Mac edition 680. All the same, you're limited to graphic cards that are supported in OSX, and you can never replaced the motherboard and CPU but keep everything else like you can in a BYO PC.

 

As I said, it's upgradeable enough, but it's not limitless like a BYOPC.

 

No, it supports the 5xx and 6xx series.  I think it supports some 7xx cards out of the box.  And no, not mac editions either.  It supports standard PC AMD cards too I believe.  Out of the box.



#93 Brian M.

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 13:58

No, it supports the 5xx and 6xx series.  I think it supports some 7xx cards out of the box.  And no, not mac editions either.  It supports standard PC AMD cards too I believe.  Out of the box.


From experience, cards without Apple's vbios will work, but you won't get a video signal until you get to the login screen.

That's how it used to be anyway - it's been a couple of years since I've messed with graphics cards in a Mac Pro.

#94 xWhiplash

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 14:27

From experience, cards without Apple's vbios will work, but you won't get a video signal until you get to the login screen.

That's how it used to be anyway - it's been a couple of years since I've messed with graphics cards in a Mac Pro.

 

Yeah that is right, you see a black screen until the OS loads.  You can flash the card if you want to.  All I am saying is OS X supports these out of the box.  I don't even need to download a NVIDIA driver for it to work.



#95 Tidosho

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 14:52

Last Apple genius I spoke with wanted to charge me $35 to replace a screw, and said Apple had to be the one to put the screw in.

Typical Apple control freakery at work again, I see... Seriously though you've got nothing to worry about. Bringing the thread back on topic away from the innovative argument, the design is correct. Heat rises, so having a fan pulling air upwards is the correct way to go. Look at the Xbox One and 360S, Their heatsinks are on top, with the fan pulling hot air up out of the vent in the natural "heat rise" way. You lose most body heat through the top of your head.

 

That's why Microsoft say they work best horizontal, and not vertical. Look at the 360's before the S. They had fans pulling hot air out the back, where inside the console the heat would be trying to rise away from the heatsink out the top of the console.

 

It's simple science, and I've explained it here for you, so this thread should be closed. To close the Innovative argument, Apple are "innovative", as they take existing tech and modify it, slapping their badge on it to claim it as theirs, like they did Siri, but they're not "inventive", where they actually invent stuff. The Japanese invent stuff, for the Chinese to counterfeit, and Apple to use Chinese Foxconn staff as slave labour at 12p a day wages. They're unethical, that's for sure. Most of the tech you'll find in Chinese branded IC chips is probably a copied Japanese invention.



#96 Brian M.

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 15:06

Typical Apple control freakery at work again, I see... Seriously though you've got nothing to worry about. Bringing the thread back on topic away from the innovative argument, the design is correct. Heat rises, so having a fan pulling air upwards is the correct way to go. Look at the Xbox One and 360S, Their heatsinks are on top, with the fan pulling hot air up out of the vent in the natural "heat rise" way. You lose most body heat through the top of your head.


Problem is, they have to book it in if they attempt any repairs. If they take it out back, put a screw in and somehow your data gets corrupted - you wouldn't have signed paperwork saying they're not responsible.

It's not that he doesn't want to put a screw in for you without charging, it's that they have to get paperwork for any repair, no matter how small, in case anything goes wrong.

#97 Tidosho

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 15:42

Problem is, they have to book it in if they attempt any repairs. If they take it out back, put a screw in and somehow your data gets corrupted - you wouldn't have signed paperwork saying they're not responsible.

It's not that he doesn't want to put a screw in for you without charging, it's that they have to get paperwork for any repair, no matter how small, in case anything goes wrong.

 

That was the whole reason I became a self employed service technician 26 years ago. I won't pay personally, or charge my customers, outrageous manufacturer prices for repairs, or any of their red tape policy crap. It's like Citroen charging £150 just to hook a diagnostic computer up to read a fault code, a 2 second job. I've been doing that stuff for years, I worked as a mechanic alongside my electronics career. The big guys do it just because they can, hence the reason people go to smaller repair outfits like me who won't rip them off.

 

One big rule in my business, don't rush the job, and double check everything before applying power, we've never had any mistakes. We use factory service manuals (including Apple) to do things right first time, if anything does go wrong we've got public liability insurance, which I've never had to use. We do have a liability disclaimer on our jobsheets, that's all it needs, not binders full of gibberish.