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sql on virtual machine?


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#1 ultimate99

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 03:49

would it be best to install sql server 2012 on a virtual machine or on local for practice and training purposes?




#2 adrynalyne

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 03:54

That is what I do, I install it to a VM.



#3 OP ultimate99

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 03:58

why would you do that and what VM you use?



#4 adrynalyne

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 04:02

why would you do that and what VM you use?

Well, mainly because:

 

I run OS X as my main OS, but also because SQL Server installs so much crap that I didn't want to clutter Windows with it.

 

So even when I was running Windows as my main OS, I used it in a VM. 

 

 

The VM OS is Windows Server 2012 R2. I used to use VMWare, but I've recently switched to Parallels.



#5 +LambdaLambdaLambdaFn

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 18:18

would it be best to install sql server 2012 on a virtual machine or on local for practice and training purposes?

 

I'd do it on a cloud server, personally:  AWS or Azure.



#6 Jarrichvdv

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 11:51

I use Windows Azure to run all my databases. It's convenient.



#7 Riva

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 10:00

SQL server works well on virtual machines. There is a 20% performance penalty but it is not visible unless you have millions of data.

#8 The_Decryptor

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 10:07

I'd do it on a cloud server, personally:  AWS or Azure.


That's overkill for local practise, no need for a DB cluster if it's one guy using a console.

#9 Dav-id

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 10:22

If you install into a VM you don't need to worry about what happens in your system, when you aren't using it you can file it away and turn it off. If you install it locally it is much more convenient (assuming you have it set to automatically start with windows). However what you could also do is install the server itself in a VM and install the management tools locally and happy connect when the VM is up.

 

If you go the VM route you should try and install on an OS that will as closely match your intended production environment as that will help reduce funkiness you might experience when you push it live - although to be fair once SQL Server is up running it is pretty damn reliable and easy to work with.

 

Personally I run multiple versions of SQL Server locally for development since it is more convenient for me and I don't have to worry about performance.



#10 +Chicane-UK

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 10:33

We run over a hundred different instances of SQL Server, in production, on VMware virtual machines. Even for big applications such as data warehousing with databases that are approaching a couple hundred gigabytes in size. 

 

SQL Server virtualises just fine.



#11 Kalint

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 15:42

That's overkill for local practise, no need for a DB cluster if it's one guy using a console.

Without a question, absurd for practice.  If he is just talking about queries and what not the VM route is too much as well.



#12 +Seahorsepip

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 17:06

would it be best to install sql server 2012 on a virtual machine or on local for practice and training purposes?

Training? I would Install a localhost devserver which includes phpmyadmin and mysql for learning sql. This way creating databases in easy for those sql queries.

 

Also maybe a bit easier method would be installing microsoft access...     Sometimes things might be a little bit different from mysql etc but for simple sql training purposes it will be more then adequate.



#13 Roger H.

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 18:13

Moved to Virtualization & Cloud Services

#14 fusi0n

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 18:21

VM.. Vmware Workstation, or if you want to get crazy and have an extra box around.. You can install the free version of vSphere Hypervisor..

http://www.vmware.co...ere-hypervisor/



#15 PGHammer

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Posted 26 July 2014 - 19:51

would it be best to install sql server 2012 on a virtual machine or on local for practice and training purposes?

Depressingly simple - simply install the OS that it needs in a VM, then install the software.  Not only are VMware and Oracle VirtualBox options, so is Hyper-V - in fact, that is one of the biggest uses FOR Hyper-V in testing-lab situations - it can be the basis for an entire virtual network - given enough CPU, you can literally simulate an entire soup-to-nuts AD-based domain on a single physical PC.  (Given the level of skill of the administrator, there are three Hyper-V-based hosting options for the VMs - Microsoft Hyper-V Server, Windows 8+, or Server 2012R2.  CPU required - Core i5 or better (any generation), with i7 preferred.  RAM required - 16 GB (32 GB or more preferred).  Local storage - 2 TB (4 TB or greater preferred).  (Those are the hosting server requirements - administrator-box requirements are, naturally, a lot less.

 

The CPU requirement - This is so the VMs themselves don't bog down.  SQL is compute-intensive (that is any version, and from anybody); it's why I refuse to suggest anything less than a quad-core for any PC hosting SQL.  Further, Microsoft SQL Server 2012 and later explicitly supports HTT (a feature of Core i7) - if you can afford it, apply it.

 

RAM requirements - Virtualization eats memory like M&Ms - therefore, fill a virtualization box up if possible.