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Would you "trust" these 2800 mAh AA batteries?


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#1 Elliot B.

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 16:48

Search results for "Rechargeable AA batteries" on Amazon UK.

 

Duracell and Energizer do 1950 mAh, 2000 mAh, 2400 mAh etc. batteries.

 

However, a company called "Palo Palocell" have some that are 2800 mAh (4th result down).

 

They're also cheaper than the lesser capacity batteries.

 

Would you "trust" them? Would the Duracell/Energizer actually be better?




#2 Manarift

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 17:06

Id go with a more safer and trust brand over an unknown brand



#3 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 17:15

I'd go with eneloop batteries or rebranded eneloop. Those duracell and energizer are probably just generic NiMH (and terrible in comparison) unless something has changed in the last few years. Eneloop batteries are ridiculously good at holding charge, and not having a memory effect, and low wearing.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eneloop

 

EDIT: It appears to me that the StayCharged Duracell are just rebranded Eneloop (they use to be). It's hard to tell because that is a newer model.



#4 Beyond Godlike

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 17:36

What I've learned about ordering batteries, if the price is too good, its for a reason.  Ive purchaed phone batteries etc etc claiming a certain amount and were 25% the cost of other brands, and its because they were nowhere near the advertised rating.  



#5 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 23:24

I'd go with eneloop batteries or rebranded eneloop. Those duracell and energizer are probably just generic NiMH (and terrible in comparison) unless something has changed in the last few years. Eneloop batteries are ridiculously good at holding charge, and not having a memory effect, and low wearing.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eneloop

 

EDIT: It appears to me that the StayCharged Duracell are just rebranded Eneloop (they use to be). It's hard to tell because that is a newer model.

Can Eneloop batteries be recharged in a normal battery recharger?



#6 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 23:59

Can Eneloop batteries be recharged in a normal battery recharger?

 

Yes, they are NiHM so any NiHM charger will work. That being said, slow and smart chargers are better though. Fast chargers kill battery life because they cause a lot of heat (that's the same issue with laptop batteries also: heat kills the cells).

 

Like I was saying though, I think those Duracells are just rebranded eneloop anyway. I suppose, most batteries that claim to hold 80% charge for 12 months are.



#7 HawkMan

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 00:51

Duracell makes awesome non rechargeable batteries, but when it comes to nimh and nicd cells the so called unknown or no name brands are often far better and if you're in the right circles, much better known brands.

RC circles is usually the best place to find out what are good quality cells. But in general when it comes to nimh and nicd, all you need to know is the mAh. The charge cycles are pretty much the same across these as long as you take care of the batteries.

#8 AJerman

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 00:51

I'd get them because of the price and try them out. The reviews look pretty decent. Rather than asking a bunch of people who haven't used them, check with the people who have actually tested capacity. Most people seem to be stating that the capacity is good. One person said 2100 mAh and was outraged... for the price 2100 mAh would be pretty good too.

 

If anything, I expect they wouldn't hold charge as well. I don't know how long the Eneloops hold charge, but I'm used to other brands that don't as well, so I just charge them when I expect to need them. Worst case, I can usually put 4 on the charger and have 2 good enough in about 15 minutes to last me until the other two are done.



#9 HawkMan

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 00:56

Yes, they are NiHM so any NiHM charger will work. That being said, slow and smart chargers are better though. Fast chargers kill battery life because they cause a lot of heat (that's the same issue with laptop batteries also: heat kills the cells).
 
Like I was saying though, I think those Duracells are just rebranded eneloop anyway. I suppose, most batteries that claim to hold 80% charge for 12 months are.


Laptops use LiIon batteries, lithium batteries unlike NiHM don't need to be babied(actually fast charging won't hurt NiHM or NiCd batteries, but they will regularly need to be cycled if you fast charge them). Lithium batteries however do vary on quality, a regular one has from 300-600 cycles in it, a proper one will be balanced, so if you empty one cell and recharge, that won't count as a full cycle, as the next time it's used it'll use the next cell and not the one that was used, thus keeping all the cells at the same number of cycles. Today most laptops use Samsung cells with 900,1200 or the latest 1500-1600 cycles lithium ion batteries.

#10 zhangm

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 00:56

NiMH batteries have maxed out at 2800 or 2900 mAh - this is the maximum amount of power that can be crammed into the form factor. Batteries at the high end of this scale are poor charge-holders, meaning that they lose charge over time (having a high self-discharge rate). The Eneloops and newer NiMH designs feature low-self discharge rates, meaning that they retain charge for much longer after being taken off a charger.

Figure this way: If your requirement for these batteries is that they are used sparingly (think an emergency flashlight) or in a remote control, then you're better off using low-self discharge batteries. If you're going to use them in a high intensity application like a racing RC car where you expect to run the batteries to the limit almost every use, then get the higher capacity ones.

#11 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 01:57

Laptops use LiIon batteries, lithium batteries unlike NiHM don't need to be babied(actually fast charging won't hurt NiHM or NiCd batteries, but they will regularly need to be cycled if you fast charge them). Lithium batteries however do vary on quality, a regular one has from 300-600 cycles in it, a proper one will be balanced, so if you empty one cell and recharge, that won't count as a full cycle, as the next time it's used it'll use the next cell and not the one that was used, thus keeping all the cells at the same number of cycles. Today most laptops use Samsung cells with 900,1200 or the latest 1500-1600 cycles lithium ion batteries.

 

When I say fast charging, I mean at rates >1 Coulomb for NiMH & LiIon (e.g. 15 minute chargers). It is well known that high charge/discharge rates and heat reduce overall battery life regardless of cell type:

http://batteryuniver...es_battery_life

http://batteryuniver...a_fast_chargers (discharge capacity vs fast charge over time)

http://batteryuniver...ow_temperatures (charge acceptance vs temperature)



#12 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 02:00

I'd get them because of the price and try them out. The reviews look pretty decent. Rather than asking a bunch of people who haven't used them, check with the people who have actually tested capacity. Most people seem to be stating that the capacity is good. One person said 2100 mAh and was outraged... for the price 2100 mAh would be pretty good too.

 

If anything, I expect they wouldn't hold charge as well. I don't know how long the Eneloops hold charge, but I'm used to other brands that don't as well, so I just charge them when I expect to need them. Worst case, I can usually put 4 on the charger and have 2 good enough in about 15 minutes to last me until the other two are done.

 

Eneloops (and Duraloops, or any of the 3rd party rebranded ones) will hold 75% of charge after 3 years if left alone unused. That's why I'm recommending them, because they aren't a huge annoyance like normal NiHM batteries ;-)

 

EDIT: I would encourage you to buy a small pack and test for yourself.

 

zhangm makes a good point, these are low self discharge (LSD) batteries. I suppose that's really the class of batteries. If you see other bands that are marketed as LSDs they may well be as good as the Eneloops or be rebranded.



#13 AJerman

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 02:02

Eneloops (and Duraloops, or any of the 3rd party rebranded ones) will hold 75% of charge after 3 years. That's why I'm recommending them, because they aren't a huge annoyance like normal NiHM batteries ;-)

 

EDIT: I would encourage you to buy a small pack and test for yourself.

Nice, I guess I need to get myself a few of those as well then. I can see use for some of each I suppose.



#14 Liana

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 03:57

I have a bunch of low-self-discharge 1900mAh Eneloops and I love them. They are definitely worth the money in my opinion. I also found a USB smart charger on Amazon that can charge either one or two at a time (a lot of chargers only charge in pairs). One thing I've read about NiMH batteries is not to drop them or subject them to too much impact because it will decrease their lifespan. I have not tested this (nor do I care to) but I am always extra careful not to drop my batteries.



#15 compl3x

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 09:34

 That being said, slow and smart chargers are better though. 

 

 

Hi. Can you recommend a slow/smart charger?