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Posted

Dublin, Ireland

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Posted

Oh PLEASE!! WTF?!?

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Posted

Hopefully this person working in a pharmacy falls under some type of "Failure to render aid" / "Duty to Rescue" law and can be legally charges. Civilly I hope the family goes after this person for whatever they can.

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Posted

Fear of lawsuits ... ?

 

Sounds like the chemist shop will have one now.

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Posted

As much as I feel for the family and the girl, the pharmacy is in the right. You are not allowed (by law) to give out prescription-only medication without a prescription, if they did give out an epipen  and it made things worse, people would be howling at the pharmacy saying 'how dare they give out a prescription medication without a prescription!'

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Posted

As much as I feel for the family and the girl, the pharmacy is in the right. You are not allowed (by law) to give out prescription-only medication without a prescription, if they did give out an epipen  and it made things worse, people would be howling at the pharmacy saying 'how dare they give out a prescription medication without a prescription!'

 

There is some protection under law that if you are rendering aid to someone in need you are protected, nothing malicious was intended, so the pharmacy, considering the circumstances would be cleared of any criminal charges.

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Posted

I say the girl was an idiot for not carrying her prescription/medicine with her.  

 

Had this happened to a family member of mine, I would have just robbed the pharmacy.  They take no hit for the stolen prescription drugs, my family member lives, and I'd stand a very decent chance of getting off due to the circumstances.

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Posted

Sucks...but there are to many drug users/people sue happy in the world that ruin it for the people who really need it.

Kinda curious how long they argued with the clerk. Arguing instead of calling for help could of mattered between her living or dying. I would of just called 911, or the equivalent, right away.

With that said...I know many people who are allergic to things. They carry around an epipen with them and have one always at work. I had a friend who was allergic to mushrooms are ate a mushroom pizza. He didnt see the mushrooms. He started having a reaction, went to his car, and used his epipen.

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Posted

There is some protection under law that if you are rendering aid to someone in need you are protected, nothing malicious was intended, so the pharmacy, considering the circumstances would be cleared of any criminal charges.

Not from what I'm aware, when you see shows following emergencies in A&E, there are always doctors there checking everything all of the time because they know if they get it wrong, they're liable, even if it's an emergency.

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Posted

There is some protection under law that if you are rendering aid to someone in need you are protected, nothing malicious was intended, so the pharmacy, considering the circumstances would be cleared of any criminal charges.

 

Tough situation. The pharmacy worker was doing what they were trained to do. Unless the girl was actually in front of him, there was probably no chance. If she was there, I would assume at the least he would have called for emergency help. Give it to one, and it'll be a non-stop, I'm dying give me meds. It's just a hard situation to be in. I probably would have erred on the side of caution and gave it to her if the girl was in front of the counter, would have called 911 as well.

 

The mother also should have immediately called 911 and probably headed to emergency if not. If she knew she had allergic reactions that serious, wth were they doing anywhere in a peanut sauce serving restaurant and how could she have eaten it without knowing? That's also somewhat irresponsible.

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Posted

There is some protection under law that if you are rendering aid to someone in need you are protected, nothing malicious was intended, so the pharmacy, considering the circumstances would be cleared of any criminal charges.

That doesn't include drugs or prescriptions.  It only protects the person rendering aid from a lawsuit.  

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Posted

I say the girl was an idiot for not carrying her prescription/medicine with her.  

 

Had this happened to a family member of mine, I would have just robbed the pharmacy.  They take no hit for the stolen prescription drugs, my family member lives, and I'd stand a very decent chance of getting off due to the circumstances.

2nd the "girl is an idiot" part, or at least her parents. 

 

I have a list of foods that if I eat them and I don't deal with it, they will kill me.  So I always carry epinephrine and/or Benadryl and am ready to use it at a moment's notice. It's a pain in the ass but it's better than dying.

 

It's not the pharmacy's fault that:

1. You didn't carry your life saving drug

2. You didn't check the ingredients (seriously WTF is wrong with you?)

3. Your parents didn't care enough to do either of the above, either.

 

It sucks that she died but that's the nature of the beast. I don't expect everyone around me to be aware of my allergies and bend over backwards for me: expecting that is asinine and a terrible idea.  You learn to look after yourself and deal with it. Unfortunately this girl never will.  The parents have no one to blame but themselves.

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Posted

Here, depending on state law, school offices stock EpiPens for emergency non-prescription dispensing, such as a kid experiencing a food allergy. AFAICT Illinois became the latest state to approve this last year.

I would also think that under Good Samaritan laws the pharmacist would have cover.

I know for a FACT that that in Michigan pharmacies will dispense emergency inhalers to an asthmatic in acute distress because it has happened to me.

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Posted

Wow, how callous can people be to say that "the pharmacy did the right thing by not providing life saving medicine"?

 

It boggles the mind!

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Posted

Not from what I'm aware, when you see shows following emergencies in A&E, there are always doctors there checking everything all of the time because they know if they get it wrong, they're liable, even if it's an emergency.

 

Omission/negligence is not a defence to many crimes, so doctors run the risk of being charged with all sorts of criminal offences every time they treat somebody; especially surgeons. If someone dies as a result of your negligence you can be guilty of manslaughter on the grounds of negligence. 

 

It comes with the territory of the job. It doesn't mean doctors should hesitate and ponder over everything they do, because people will die if they're not swift and efficient. 

 

If the pharmacist realised the severity of the situation, they should have tried to do something, consequences be damned. 

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Posted

pretty sure the follows the same lines as china.  People will watch others die out of fear of being sued if they die anyways.

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Posted

Wow, how callous can people be to say that "the pharmacy did the right thing by not providing life saving medicine"?

 

It boggles the mind!

 

People are looking at it with cold, calm logic; something that they wouldn't do if they were in the same situation.

 

You always see armchair doctors, lawyers, scientists etc. commenting on things they don't understand. This is no different. 

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Posted

Regardless of whether the girl and family weren't prepared when they should have been, it is still a tragedy. It's kind of ridiculous that there are people who are just like "I would have done better." Because, as we know everyone here is perfectly responsible in ever situation and carries around exactly what they need in all circumstances. I know I have never forgotten my inhaler at any point my life :no:.

 

The reality of course is that people aren't always prepared or responsible when they should be and those who are acting like they are are basically misjudging their diligence and on a high horse.

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Posted

Depending on the situation, the pharmacist may be liable anyway. I know in America a nurse who refuses to help can be liable.

 

Here's the oath of a pharmacist.

 

Oath of a Pharmacist
 
 

The revised Oath was adopted by the AACP House of Delegates in July 2007 and has been approved by the American Pharmacists Association. AACP member institutions should plan to use the revised Oath of a Pharmacist during the 2008-09 academic year and with spring 2009 graduates.

"I promise to devote myself to a lifetime of service to others through the profession of pharmacy. In fulfilling this vow:

  • I will consider the welfare of humanity and relief of suffering my primary concerns.
  • I will apply my knowledge, experience, and skills to the best of my ability to assure optimal outcomes for my patients.
  • I will respect and protect all personal and health information entrusted to me.
  • I will accept the lifelong obligation to improve my professional knowledge and competence.
  • I will hold myself and my colleagues to the highest principles of our profession

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Posted

 

Depending on the situation, the pharmacist may be liable anyway. I know in America a nurse who refuses to help can be liable.

 

Here's the oath of a pharmacist.

 

Oath of a Pharmacist
 
 

The revised Oath was adopted by the AACP House of Delegates in July 2007 and has been approved by the American Pharmacists Association. AACP member institutions should plan to use the revised Oath of a Pharmacist during the 2008-09 academic year and with spring 2009 graduates.

"I promise to devote myself to a lifetime of service to others through the profession of pharmacy. In fulfilling this vow:

  • I will consider the welfare of humanity and relief of suffering my primary concerns.
  • I will apply my knowledge, experience, and skills to the best of my ability to assure optimal outcomes for my patients.
  • I will respect and protect all personal and health information entrusted to me.
  • I will accept the lifelong obligation to improve my professional knowledge and competence.
  • I will hold myself and my colleagues to the highest principles of our profession

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Posted

Omission/negligence is not a defence to many crimes, so doctors run the risk of being charged with all sorts of criminal offences every time they treat somebody; especially surgeons. If someone dies as a result of your negligence you can be guilty of manslaughter on the grounds of negligence. 

 

It comes with the territory of the job. It doesn't mean doctors should hesitate and ponder over everything they do, because people will die if they're not swift and efficient. 

 

If the pharmacist realised the severity of the situation, they should have tried to do something, consequences be damned. 

So you're saying you'd happily give someone something which might not even help them with the consequences being you are struck off from ever working in the medical field again (and it'll follow you around to every job you apply for too), and potentially being imprisoned for giving unprescribed drugs to people/manslaughter and the person possibly dying anyway? (Bearing in mind if you do not have a valid prescription for a drug and have it on you, depending upon what it is, it can be classed the same as recreational drugs in classes A-C)

Well, good luck in life if you take that attitude.

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Posted

Not from what I'm aware, when you see shows following emergencies in A&E, there are always doctors there checking everything all of the time because they know if they get it wrong, they're liable, even if it's an emergency.

 

Doctors fall under specific rules and have to carry specific insurance, a normal person rendering aid doesn't have an obligation like a Doctor does.

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Posted

Regardless of whether the girl and family weren't prepared when they should have been, it is still a tragedy. It's kind of ridiculous that there are people who are just like "I would have done better." Because, as we know everyone here is perfectly responsible in ever situation and carries around exactly what they need in all circumstances. I know I have never forgotten my inhaler at any point my life :no:.

 

The reality of course is that people aren't always prepared or responsible when they should be and those who are acting like they are are basically misjudging their diligence and on a high horse.

 

I agree with you in a general sense. The whole situation is unfortunate. But I would hope most parents would absolutely be prepared before going out to eat with their child with this severe of a problem, and would even taste any sauce in a Chinese restaurant to make sure it wasn't peanut.

 

I don't "blame" the parents and without knowing exactly what the employee saw in the pharmacy, I'm not "blaming" them either. I personally would have given it to here if she was there gasping. I would not have given it to the mother if the  person was not right there. I think the discussion is only taking this tone because if we're looking for someone to blame, people are pointing out there's plenty of options.

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Doctors fall under specific rules and have to carry specific insurance, a normal person rendering aid doesn't have an obligation like a Doctor does.

You do know what a pharmacist is, right?

A pharmacist can dispense what is on a presciption which is signed and validated by a doctor for prescription-only medications (adrenaline is such a medication) but can also (at their own discretion) allow some pharmacist-only medications to be dispensed (such as stronger cough medications etc.)

A pharmacist does NOT have the power to write a prescription or dispense prescription only medication without a valid prescription, that is highly illegal under any circumstances.

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Posted

Why was it necessary to point out that the pharmacist was male?

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