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#1 Hum

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:33

Dublin, Ireland –  A teenage girl died on the street after a pharmacy refused to hand over a life-saving adrenaline injection to the girl's mother because she didn't have a prescription.

Emma Sloan, 14, suffered an allergic reaction to peanuts after mistaking satay sauce for curry sauce at a Chinese restaurant in Dublin. She told her mother, Caroline, she was having difficulty breathing.

The family rushed round the corner to the Hamilton Long chemist shop but a male worker told Caroline they couldn’t give her an EpiPen shot - a special allergy injection - without a prescription. The worker advised Sloan to take her daughter to hospital but Emma collapsed on the street outside.

A passing doctor, as well as ambulance staff and firefighters, tried to resuscitate her but it was too late. The teenager died in front of her two sisters.

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#2 DocM

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:37

Oh PLEASE!! WTF?!?

#3 xendrome

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:42

Hopefully this person working in a pharmacy falls under some type of "Failure to render aid" / "Duty to Rescue" law and can be legally charges. Civilly I hope the family goes after this person for whatever they can.



#4 OP Hum

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:44

Fear of lawsuits ... ?

 

Sounds like the chemist shop will have one now.



#5 n_K

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:50

As much as I feel for the family and the girl, the pharmacy is in the right. You are not allowed (by law) to give out prescription-only medication without a prescription, if they did give out an epipen  and it made things worse, people would be howling at the pharmacy saying 'how dare they give out a prescription medication without a prescription!'



#6 xendrome

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:52

As much as I feel for the family and the girl, the pharmacy is in the right. You are not allowed (by law) to give out prescription-only medication without a prescription, if they did give out an epipen  and it made things worse, people would be howling at the pharmacy saying 'how dare they give out a prescription medication without a prescription!'

 

There is some protection under law that if you are rendering aid to someone in need you are protected, nothing malicious was intended, so the pharmacy, considering the circumstances would be cleared of any criminal charges.



#7 Rohdekill

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:57

I say the girl was an idiot for not carrying her prescription/medicine with her.  

 

Had this happened to a family member of mine, I would have just robbed the pharmacy.  They take no hit for the stolen prescription drugs, my family member lives, and I'd stand a very decent chance of getting off due to the circumstances.



#8 +techbeck

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:58

Sucks...but there are to many drug users/people sue happy in the world that ruin it for the people who really need it.

Kinda curious how long they argued with the clerk. Arguing instead of calling for help could of mattered between her living or dying. I would of just called 911, or the equivalent, right away.

With that said...I know many people who are allergic to things. They carry around an epipen with them and have one always at work. I had a friend who was allergic to mushrooms are ate a mushroom pizza. He didnt see the mushrooms. He started having a reaction, went to his car, and used his epipen.

#9 n_K

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:59

There is some protection under law that if you are rendering aid to someone in need you are protected, nothing malicious was intended, so the pharmacy, considering the circumstances would be cleared of any criminal charges.

Not from what I'm aware, when you see shows following emergencies in A&E, there are always doctors there checking everything all of the time because they know if they get it wrong, they're liable, even if it's an emergency.



#10 MorganX

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 23:59

There is some protection under law that if you are rendering aid to someone in need you are protected, nothing malicious was intended, so the pharmacy, considering the circumstances would be cleared of any criminal charges.

 

Tough situation. The pharmacy worker was doing what they were trained to do. Unless the girl was actually in front of him, there was probably no chance. If she was there, I would assume at the least he would have called for emergency help. Give it to one, and it'll be a non-stop, I'm dying give me meds. It's just a hard situation to be in. I probably would have erred on the side of caution and gave it to her if the girl was in front of the counter, would have called 911 as well.

 

The mother also should have immediately called 911 and probably headed to emergency if not. If she knew she had allergic reactions that serious, wth were they doing anywhere in a peanut sauce serving restaurant and how could she have eaten it without knowing? That's also somewhat irresponsible.



#11 Rohdekill

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:00

There is some protection under law that if you are rendering aid to someone in need you are protected, nothing malicious was intended, so the pharmacy, considering the circumstances would be cleared of any criminal charges.

That doesn't include drugs or prescriptions.  It only protects the person rendering aid from a lawsuit.  



#12 siah1214

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:03

I say the girl was an idiot for not carrying her prescription/medicine with her.  

 

Had this happened to a family member of mine, I would have just robbed the pharmacy.  They take no hit for the stolen prescription drugs, my family member lives, and I'd stand a very decent chance of getting off due to the circumstances.

2nd the "girl is an idiot" part, or at least her parents. 

 

I have a list of foods that if I eat them and I don't deal with it, they will kill me.  So I always carry epinephrine and/or Benadryl and am ready to use it at a moment's notice. It's a pain in the ass but it's better than dying.

 

It's not the pharmacy's fault that:

1. You didn't carry your life saving drug

2. You didn't check the ingredients (seriously WTF is wrong with you?)

3. Your parents didn't care enough to do either of the above, either.

 

It sucks that she died but that's the nature of the beast. I don't expect everyone around me to be aware of my allergies and bend over backwards for me: expecting that is asinine and a terrible idea.  You learn to look after yourself and deal with it. Unfortunately this girl never will.  The parents have no one to blame but themselves.



#13 DocM

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:04

Here, depending on state law, school offices stock EpiPens for emergency non-prescription dispensing, such as a kid experiencing a food allergy. AFAICT Illinois became the latest state to approve this last year.

I would also think that under Good Samaritan laws the pharmacist would have cover.

I know for a FACT that that in Michigan pharmacies will dispense emergency inhalers to an asthmatic in acute distress because it has happened to me.

#14 greenwizard88

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:08

Wow, how callous can people be to say that "the pharmacy did the right thing by not providing life saving medicine"?

 

It boggles the mind!



#15 Hardcore Til I Die

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 00:10

Not from what I'm aware, when you see shows following emergencies in A&E, there are always doctors there checking everything all of the time because they know if they get it wrong, they're liable, even if it's an emergency.

 

Omission/negligence is not a defence to many crimes, so doctors run the risk of being charged with all sorts of criminal offences every time they treat somebody; especially surgeons. If someone dies as a result of your negligence you can be guilty of manslaughter on the grounds of negligence. 

 

It comes with the territory of the job. It doesn't mean doctors should hesitate and ponder over everything they do, because people will die if they're not swift and efficient. 

 

If the pharmacist realised the severity of the situation, they should have tried to do something, consequences be damned.