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Poll: Age Restrictions for games

What level of responsibility to retailers have?

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#46 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 19:38

I can understand how involuntary adult situations such as divorce, boundary issues, or playing the role of a caregiver may lead to psychological problems, but what about voluntarily playing a video game? There's a huge difference between voluntary and involuntary...

How does whether an adult situation is entered voluntarily reflect on whether someone is equipt to handle the situation? Choice has nothing to do with preparation or ones emotional maturity. Choice is really misnomer here anyway, because it is not as of a child is going to know the adult situations that the game entails going in, the same as as how a child does not know the situations that life entails going in. 




#47 OP compl3x

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 06:06

I was 15, I went into a Woolworths to buy Thief (2000) which was a 12. They asked me my age, obviously said 15. The staff member wasn't sure and asked someone else to come over and they started staring at me.

 

Uncomfortable.

 

Do you have any ID, they asked (why the hell would I have ID at the age of 15?!)

 

They refused to sell it to me.

 

They didn't even have a legal obligation to not sell it to me at that time, ages on games were just a guideline.

 

Never bought anything from there since and was really thrilled when they went into liquidation in 2009. :)

 

 

Whoa, Talk about holding a grudge.  :laugh:



#48 Colicab

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 07:25

I was 15, I went into a Woolworths to buy Thief (2000) which was a 12. They asked me my age, obviously said 15. The staff member wasn't sure and asked someone else to come over and they started staring at me.
 
Uncomfortable.
 
Do you have any ID, they asked (why the hell would I have ID at the age of 15?!)
 
They refused to sell it to me.
 
They didn't even have a legal obligation to not sell it to me at that time, ages on games were just a guideline.
 
Never bought anything from there since and was really thrilled when they went into liquidation in 2009. :)


Id rather you held your grudge than, I the person behind the counter lost my job. Better to be on the side of caution than to risk being on the dole for selling to minors?

Also I imagine you no doubt went down the street to a different shop and bought the game there.

#49 +jamesyfx

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 20:28

If I had suspicions I would not sell an age restricted product unless that person provided me with ID. Theres no way I'm going to pay a huge fine. I'd rather annoy one person than lose my job and get fined.

 

Where I work we sell a lot of age restricted stuff. Knives, solvents, lasers, games.. etc. So I always think.. No ID, No sale. :p



#50 srbeen

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 20:37

I used to rent VHS and DVD's. At that time I couldn't rent a R or 18+ movie, I had to get mom/dad/brother to do it for me. I feel the same should be applied with games. If its not, why is there even a review board? Retail is one thing, but digital downloads really skew the situation.



#51 Mark

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 19:45

Id rather you held your grudge than, I the person behind the counter lost my job. Better to be on the side of caution than to risk being on the dole for selling to minors?

Also I imagine you no doubt went down the street to a different shop and bought the game there.

 

I live in a tiny crappy town where it was the only place to buy PC games.

 

Also, they wouldn't have got in any trouble as it wasn't even illegal!



#52 HawkMan

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 19:49

I live in a tiny crappy town where it was the only place to buy PC games.

 

Also, they wouldn't have got in any trouble as it wasn't even illegal!

 

Doesn't mean it wasn't against store policy. 



#53 Mark

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 21:51

Doesn't mean it wasn't against store policy. 

 

I believe it was more the case that the shop assistant believed that ratings on games at the time were like those on movies, enforcable by the law, which was not the case.

 

Still, it was about 14 years ago now so I think I have finally let go of the Thief debacle.



#54 Colicab

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Posted 16 January 2014 - 11:12

I believe it was more the case that the shop assistant believed that ratings on games at the time were like those on movies, enforcable by the law, which was not the case.
 
Still, it was about 14 years ago now so I think I have finally let go of the Thief debacle.


As a business owner its his choice if he sells it to you or not. And whilst you may think "oh hes being a ratings Nazi", maybe he just wanted to do his job well and uphold a standard for his shop. Either way he had every right to do so, as a minor trying to buy something you know is not meant for you. Id say him being the adult in the situation, did you a favor. Or at least allowed him to go home at night happy he wasnt selling to minors, moral compass` and what not.

Also this :
 

Mon, Jul 30, 2012 | 10:04 BST
PEGI becomes UK law today

PEGI age classification for games becomes law in the UK today, making it illegal for retailers to sell games to anyone under age.

Although it feels as though it’s been around for ages, PEGI is now officially UK law from today, enforcing the standard on retailers everywhere.

The PEGI age classification system completely replaces the classic BBFC ratings, which will no longer be used.

PEGI also comes with harsh penalties for anyone found to be selling games to anyone under age, such as a £5,000 fine and up to six years in prison.

Culture minister Ed Vaizey chipped in with his own thoughts on the PEGI standard: “The UK has one of the most dynamic and innovative video games industries in the world, and the games they produce not only entertain millions, but can also educate and foster creativity.

“Today’s simplification of the ratings system benefits both industry and consumers and will help ensure that the millions of games sold in the UK each year are being played by the audiences they were intended for.”



#55 WelshBluebird

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 11:47

I believe it was more the case that the shop assistant believed that ratings on games at the time were like those on movies, enforcable by the law, which was not the case.

 

Still, it was about 14 years ago now so I think I have finally let go of the Thief debacle.

 

Not quite the case. Ratings on games were a bit complicated because there were two different ratings used. The BBFC (who also rate movies) and PEGI (who just rate games). The BBFC ratings were legally enforceable, the PEGI ones were not. That changed in 2012 when all game ratings moved to being PEGI, and PEGI ratings became legally enforceable.



#56 Mark

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 18:24

As a business owner its his choice if he sells it to you or not. And whilst you may think "oh hes being a ratings Nazi", maybe he just wanted to do his job well and uphold a standard for his shop. Either way he had every right to do so, as a minor trying to buy something you know is not meant for you. Id say him being the adult in the situation, did you a favor. Or at least allowed him to go home at night happy he wasnt selling to minors, moral compass` and what not.

Also this :
 

 

 

She. Who's a nazi now?!!!!  :woot:

 

Also, in regards to your quote, I was referencing an event in the year 2000...