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Was your router listening on port 32764?   141 votes

  1. 1. Was your router listening on port 32764?

    • Yes
      1
    • No I was stealth or closed
      140

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Posted

Click here to see if your router is listening on port

 

Click the link below then click the "Probe THIS port button"

http://GRC.com/portprobe=32764

 

http://www.neowin.net/news/some-routers-found-to-be-listening-on-undocumented-port

 

A few days ago, a known hacker named Eloi Vanderbeken posted up a note on GitHub. He wrote about his discovery that his Linksys WAG200G wireless DSL gateway was listening on the undocumented TCP port 32764. He later found that the port was open on a number of other routers from Linksys, Netgear, Cisco and others. While some of these products have the port open just on their local network, several of them are exposed when connected to the Internet.

 

So why do so many of these routers have this previously unknown port? It's not currently known, but the GHacks.net website offers up several ways to find out if a home or work router has this undocumented port active.

If the port is found, the site has a number of recommendations to close this vulnerability. They include adding a rule to the router's firewall to block the 32764 port or downloading an open source firmware for the hardware

. Of course, the easiest thing to do is simply replace the router with one that is not listening in on the port.

 

 

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Posted

Status: closed

 

I take it thats a "no"?

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Posted

Mine says status: stealth.  

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Posted

Stealth :shiftyninja:

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Posted

. Stealth

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Posted

Stealth. Cisco ASA 5510.
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Posted

This doesn't reliability tell you if you have a backdoor in general though. The design could be such that some routers report stealth unless a magic packet is sent to the specific port... that'd be certainly the way I'd implement it myself if I were hiding a backdoor.

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Posted

Stealth for me.

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Posted

Stealth? Forgive my ignorance, but is that a good thing?

The status of the router at my mum's place is closed. I'll check on my router tomorrow when I get back.

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Posted

Stealth? Forgive my ignorance, but is that a good thing?

The status of the router at my mum's place is closed. I'll check on my router tomorrow when I get back.

 

In this case, I'd say stealth (drops the packet without any response) is the best, closed is good as well (it gives back an response, though the port is still closed).

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Posted

Stealth for me too. 

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Posted

Stealth? Forgive my ignorance, but is that a good thing?

The status of the router at my mum's place is closed. I'll check on my router tomorrow when I get back.

 

Stealth

 

A "Stealth" port is one that completely ignores and simply "drops" any incoming packets without telling the sender whether the port is "Open" or "Closed" for business. When all of your system's ports are stealth (and assuming that your personal firewall security system doesn't make the mistake of "counter-probing" the prober), your system will be completely opaque and invisible to the random scans which continually sweep through the Internet.

 

Even if this machine had previously been scanned and logged by a would-be intruder, a methodical return to this IP address will lead any attacker to believe that your machine is turned off, disconnected, or no longer exists. You couldn't ask for anything better. Your personal firewall or NAT router protected system is acting like a black hole for TCP/IP packets. That's very cool.

 

If your system did NOT show up as Stealth, but you would like it to, you will need to use one of the many free or inexpensive personal firewalls that are now widely available. Of the many firewalls on that list, we recommend (in alphabetical order) firewalls from Agnitum, Kerio, Norton, Sygate, Tiny, and ZoneLabs. I describe the operation of personal firewalls on this page.

 

Closed

 

"Closed" is the best you can hope for without a stealth firewall or NAT router in place. At least the port is not "Open" for business and accepting connections from the probes which are continually sweeping the Internet searching for exploitable systems.

 

Anyone scanning past your IP address will detect your PC, but "closed" ports will quickly refuse connection attempts. Since it's much faster for a scanner to re-scan a machine that's known to exist, the presence of your machine might be logged for further scrutiny at a later time

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Posted

<Explanation>

 

<Detailed explanation>

Ahh right. Networking isn't my forte so I was confused for a moment. Cheers guys. (Y)

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Posted

now, i'm not up on all of this, but would this report about the setting of the firewall on my computer?  or the router itself?

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Posted

now, i'm not up on all of this, but would this report about the setting of the firewall on my computer?  or the router itself?

 

If you are behind a router, then router

If you are connected directly to the internet with an internet IP instead of a none routable on then it's testing your computers firewall.

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Posted

Mine is set to stealth as well.

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Posted

Stealth.  Linksys WRTP54G

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Posted

Hello,

This doesn't reliability tell you if you have a backdoor in general though. The design could be such that some routers report stealth unless a magic packet is sent to the specific port... that'd be certainly the way I'd implement it myself if I were hiding a backdoor.

There is no backdoor.

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Posted

Status: STEALTH

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Posted

Status: STEALTH

Yep then there is that bug where the text gets cut off.

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Posted

My router is a Belkin running Tomato USB. GRC reports the port as stealth.

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Posted

Hello,
There is no backdoor.

 

I'm not sure you what you are talking about. Was it discovered that there is legitimate reason for that particular port to be open? I was under the impression that there was a specific exploitable vulnerability.

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Posted

Stealth.

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Posted

Status: CLOSED (Netgear WNDR3700v4 with latest factory firmware)

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Posted

Stealth on a TP-Link TD-W8968

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Posted

Ahh right. Networking isn't my forte so I was confused for a moment. Cheers guys. (Y)


Ehh, Stealth isn't any more secure than Closed, it just gives the idea what the system is powered off (Because at this point it's not like you'll find an unused IPv4 address). I setup my firewall to close connections (So it reports as closed, funnily enough) because it's faster than dropping them (The other system will retry) and it's easier to deal with debugging in that case.

Responding to pings would give an attacker more information (Yet, is still just as harmless)

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