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Poll: Was your router listening on port 32764?

Was your router listening on port 32764?

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#61 adrynalyne

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 03:42

Hello,
There is no backdoor.

Everyone has a backdoor.  In fact, everyone uses it, daily.




#62 adrynalyne

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 03:44

It's also why I use whitelisting (any unknown MAC ID gets voted off the network).

MAC filtering is pretty easy to bypass.

 

I was able to get onto a network using MAC filtering by merely spoofing my MAC address.



#63 hyde+

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 03:46

MAC filtering is pretty easy to bypass.

I was able to get onto a network using MAC filtering by merely spoofing my MAC address.


You mean you would first have to get one of the allowed mac addresses.

#64 froggyliver

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 03:48

Seems like a good way to really hide a backdoor would be having a rule that only IP range X thru X could even access the backdoor. Then it could not even be discovered by anyone else or at least really limited.



#65 Nashy

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:11

Stealth.  Netgear.... black one.



#66 The_Decryptor

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 05:35

You mean you would first have to get one of the allowed mac addresses.


Which is easy, if you can break the security you can sniff a packet.

#67 +ians18

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 05:38

:shiftyninja: >>Stealth<< :shiftyninja: 



#68 0nyX

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 07:01

Closed



#69 Dinggus

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 07:13

Closed. So far 103 are closed.



#70 adrynalyne

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 08:11

You mean you would first have to get one of the allowed mac addresses.

Attached to every data packet leaving that network, right?

 

I am not a security expert, but from what I have experienced, MAC filtering hasn't hindered nor helped security on a network other than to stop those who wouldn't have the know-how to crack the initial security anyway.  If there was a backdoor on routers, getting a whitelisted MAC I imagine is pretty straightforward.

 

I could be wrong and welcome someone more knowledgeable than me to set me straight in the matter.



#71 The_Decryptor

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 08:54

If the backdoor was publicly accessible, you could simply connect to the router and copy the a MAC address, or modify one to add your box to the allowed list.

MAC filtering is a leftover of the WEP days where somebody could break into your network in a couple of minutes (So every bit of "security" was helpful), now with WPA2-PSK with AES that isn't going to happen, it's easier to physically break in and plug into a switch (Which is the point really, it requires the attacker to have physical access to break in, which should be much harder to overcome)

If somebody can break your AES secured wifi network, then you can be sure as hell that a MAC filter won't hinder them in the slightest.

#72 JonnyLH

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 18:12

Ehh, I've never really felt it was a security measure at all, that's a job for the firewall (Even though it's designed to break end to end connectivity, it's actually fairly easy to punch a hole through a NAT, most software does it automatically these days, the Xbox One punches holes in it for P2P, etc. Even without stuff like UPnP)

Not really, everything is blind to anything internal when the gateway is behind a NAT for the simple reason. Every router will drop every packet incoming if it has no entry on the translation table. The only way to 'poke' a hole through NAT is by a client sending a message out on that port, after that any incoming traffic which comes in on that port will be sent to that client.

 

The 360 and X1 used to sometimes get round this by using a flavour of UPnP but it uses the same ideology that the client sends a packet, in which then the servers initiates the stream. UPnP is a standard for how clients establish an entry in the translation table and prompt the device to transmit, but it has to be initiated by the client.

 

So if you wanted to open a port to a client on a LAN behind a NAT for malicious purposes, you have to install some malware on the device you want and time it to be able to send packets at specific times. Keeping in mind that a router will usually drop a entry in the NAT table after only a couple of seconds of inactivity from that client.



#73 x-scratch

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 18:15

32764 transpixel.gif
Stealth Unknown Protocol for this port
Unknown Application for this port

#74 MillionVoltss

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 18:22

Stealth AC66U



#75 xrobwx

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 18:26

Buffalo AirStation™ Extreme AC 1750 Gigabit Dual Band Wireless Router

Stealth

 

I've been using Steve Gibson's site since the mid 1990's. Thanks for the post!!