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My previous phone was a HTC Sensation and I was really looking forward to the update from 2.3 to 4.0.3 but the reality was that it dramatically slowed down the phone and made it unresponsive.

 

Part of the problem is that HTC continually update Sense, meaning that an Android update is accompanied by a UI update. The only way around that would be to support multiple versions of Sense, which makes support considerably more complicated. That's especially true for HTC, as it has a habit of bringing out countless variations of devices (One X, One X+, One XL, One S, One SV, One SC, One S C2, One ST, One V, One VX, One XC).

 

That said, HTC should be providing Android updates, especially when security is involved. It also can't be that difficult when you're talking about smaller updates, like 4.2 -> 4.3 or 4.3 -> 4.4. Tardy updates and a lack of support attract a lot of bad will and that was one of the reasons I decided against the HTC One Max. Even when devices are supported the updates usually arrive incredibly late and poorly optimised.

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Yeah, same here with the Desire HD. Looked forward to getting the ICS upgrade which was then cancelled by them so ended up getting very little in terms of updates for the phone. If it wasn't for the community I would have been stuck on gingerbread until I picked up my Nexus 5.

 

This pretty much was the deciding factor on purchasing a google phone this time around since HTC cannot be bothered with upgrades for very long with their phones.

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Hello,

HTC = Dead Beat Dad, who has all these baby mommas, but only acknowledges the current baby momma and the current kid, and act like the rest don't exist...

That came out of nowhere...

 

I had a HTC Desire HD. I will never ever own a HTC device ever again. HTC deserves to die for how badly they handled its update.

Yup, that affected me too. One of the biggest anal bleeding ass######s (had to top Showan's comment) ever by a mobile company. My next phone I am sure will not be a HTC as they have abandonded the QWERTY market.

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I would say at least 2 years after release they should be doing updates.

 

Updates aren't a new request to come from users.  From an engineering perspective, why aren't they writing their software in a way that supports easy updates? Especially for a company like HTC that needs any way to compete with Samsung in a realistic manner. Solid and fast updates could help get them some customers back.

 

I understand there are lower level changes they make for each device, but I can't imagine they rewrite the Kernel code for every device on every version... Why waste all of that engineering money when you could streamline it?

 

I'd argue 12 months from the point it is removed from active sale (by the manufacturer) is a reasonable timeframe for updates.  Early adopters will get them for 2 years, late adopters for a minimum of 1 year.

 

I think this is disgusting on the part of HTC.  It's no wonder they are failing in the market.  It's also why I insist to everyone I know who gets wants an Android device, to get a Nexus.

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Just wondering - and I may as well ask it here to generate a bit of discussion - but how long have these devices been available? Being an avid supporter of Android I can appreciate that service providers drop updates quickly, but this is why we go for the custom ROMs. Heck, I had a bad upgrade and had to roll back, and my friend asked me why I would bother in the first place. My response was that if I didn't I would still be on Gingerbread.

The topic came up not so long ago - how long should a company support their hardware? I agreed that 2-5 years would be adequate, yet the industry (at least on the Android front) doesn't do it, the manufacturers and service providers drop the device support all too quickly.

If a company says one thing and does another then that is another topic, but unless I'm mistaken this particular case isn't unusual?

Honestly, at almost 2 years like the One X or the Galaxy Nexus, etc. If you care about updates, you're probably looking to upgrade your hardware by now. Hell, I don't even make it a year now because I like the latest and greatest. Software updates don't mean anything when your phone is ancient. So I'd say that typically coming up on that 18 months to 2 years mark, if you care, you're probably ready for a phone upgrade. If not, you probably don't care enough about the OS version.

 

How often do you guys that claim to be interested in the latest and greatest software upgrade your phones? Are you using 3 or 4 year old phones, just wanting software updates even though the hardware of the phone is so far out of date? It just seems to me like the group that cares about software updates would usually be similar to the group that cares about hardware updates and it would be more of a talking point and less of an actual issue.

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I'd argue 12 months from the point it is removed from active sale (by the manufacturer) is a reasonable timeframe for updates.  Early adopters will get them for 2 years, late adopters for a minimum of 1 year.

 

I think this is disgusting on the part of HTC.  It's no wonder they are failing in the market.  It's also why I insist to everyone I know who gets wants an Android device, to get a Nexus.

 

I'd say that a phone should be supported for the length of the contract as a minimum.  If I have a two year contract then I expect that the phone will be supported throughout my contract, regardless of whether I bought the phone on the first day it was released or not.  In effect, that means that the manufacturer should be providing updates for two years after the last phone goes on sale (assuming contracts last for two years).

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Honestly, at almost 2 years like the One X or the Galaxy Nexus, etc. If you care about updates, you're probably looking to upgrade your hardware by now. Hell, I don't even make it a year now because I like the latest and greatest. Software updates don't mean anything when your phone is ancient. So I'd say that typically coming up on that 18 months to 2 years mark, if you care, you're probably ready for a phone upgrade. If not, you probably don't care enough about the OS version.

 

How often do you guys that claim to be interested in the latest and greatest software upgrade your phones? Are you using 3 or 4 year old phones, just wanting software updates even though the hardware of the phone is so far out of date? It just seems to me like the group that cares about software updates would usually be similar to the group that cares about hardware updates and it would be more of a talking point and less of an actual issue.

 

I keep my phones for between 1-2 years.  I am typically an early adopter, buying phones on the day of their release or within the first month.  I expect to receive regular updates in the time-frame I own the phone.

 

According to GSMArena (http://www.gsmarena.com/htc_one_x+-4976.php) the One X+ was released in November 2012 - making the phone about 1 year and 2 months old - simply unacceptable that it is no longer receiving updates.

I'd say that a phone should be supported for the length of the contract as a minimum.  If I have a two year contract then I expect that the phone will be supported throughout my contract, regardless of whether I bought the phone on the first day it was released or not.  In effect, that means that the manufacturer should be providing updates for two years after the last phone goes on sale (assuming contracts last for two years).

 

Fair point.

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Coming from a former HTC user, this doesn't surprise me at all.  It was a big reason for me going with the iPhone 5S when I upgraded.  Apple seems to support their products long after they've been on the shelf.  I had a iPhone 4 that I bought used 3 months before the 5S came out to compare the droid/apple eco systems and I was beyond impressed with Apple.  Being able to run iOS7 on a device that was over two years old... meanwhile my Evo4G was abandoned by HTC and left with Gingerbread being it's newest official rom. 

 

The other impressive point was being able to add my account to the new iPhone and all my apps/etc... loaded on it right away.  Seems like HTC never got that right.  Reloaded my phone, then had to reselect each app and setup all my mail accounts from scratch.  

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That's why HTC Desire was my first and last HTC device.

This time I am taking chances with LG with their G2.

If that doesn't get updates up to Android 4.5/5.0, I will switch to iPhone 6S or 7.

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I keep my phones for between 1-2 years.  I am typically an early adopter, buying phones on the day of their release or within the first month.  I expect to receive regular updates in the time-frame I own the phone.

 

According to GSMArena (http://www.gsmarena.com/htc_one_x+-4976.php) the One X+ was released in November 2012 - making the phone about 1 year and 2 months old - simply unacceptable that it is no longer receiving updates.

 

Fair point.

That's because the One X+ was just a spec bump on an existing phone. The One X was released in May 2012. But I know what you mean. Even the original One X wasn't a full year. I just think that most people who are still on the One X probably don't care that much.

 

On top of that, after we got to roughly JB or so, updates haven't been so necessary or groundbreaking. I could be perfectly happy on a phone with 4.2 or even 4.1 for a long time, vs older versions like Froyo or GB that needed an update ASAP. It's almost like a case of "If it ain't broke, don't fix it.". And if you NEED the latest and greatest, you need a newer phone.

 

I can agree I'd like to see 2 years be the standard support time considering it's contract time, but I wouldn't expect anything more past that.

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Pretty poor show to be honest. I have to say that people rail against Apple (and often quite deservedly so) but at least the firmware support for their older devices is pretty impressive - and puts companies like HTC to abandon their old devices sometimes barely even after a year after releasing them, to shame. 

 

I learned my lesson about HTC with the Desire. I'll never buy another HTC device. 

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So my wife has an HTC One on Verizon, and is only about 6 months into her contract.  :/ 
Anyone have any resources that can point me in the direction of installing a custom ROM on a Verizon phone that will not void the contract or anything along those lines? I honestly do not know much about it at all which is why I ask, and I am even thinking it may not be something that is doable.

 

TIA,

DL

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So my wife has an HTC One on Verizon, and is only about 6 months into her contract.  :/ 

Anyone have any resources that can point me in the direction of installing a custom ROM on a Verizon phone that will not void the contract or anything along those lines? I honestly do not know much about it at all which is why I ask, and I am even thinking it may not be something that is doable.

 

TIA,

DL

To be honest, it's the kind of thing you need to do your own research on and not ask about. I only say this because there is a CHANCE of damaging something, and it's better to actually know what you're doing than just being told "press this, press this, download this" and then it's broken and you have no idea why.

 

Here's a link to an info thread in the Verizon HTC One section of XDA. This will give you links to info about how to root or unlock it, as well as how to change it back if necessary. Phones now days are VERY difficult to brick in my experience, and you can almost get a recovery file to flash it back to stock. http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2417177

 

Read around the Verizon HTC One section and you should see that it's not too terribly hard. For the most part it involves unlocking it, installing a custom recovery (TWRP or CWM), then using recovery to flash a new ROM. It's quite simple, but it's something you should read up on before attempting. If I may make a suggestion, I flashed my One to the Google Play edition and was very happy with it like that. Nearly AOSP with full device support, can't go wrong!

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So my wife has an HTC One on Verizon, and is only about 6 months into her contract. :/

Anyone have any resources that can point me in the direction of installing a custom ROM on a Verizon phone that will not void the contract or anything along those lines? I honestly do not know much about it at all which is why I ask, and I am even thinking it may not be something that is doable.

TIA,

DL

HTC One != HTC One X/X+

The One is still schedules for updates.

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Honestly, at almost 2 years like the One X or the Galaxy Nexus, etc. If you care about updates, you're probably looking to upgrade your hardware by now. Hell, I don't even make it a year now because I like the latest and greatest. Software updates don't mean anything when your phone is ancient. So I'd say that typically coming up on that 18 months to 2 years mark, if you care, you're probably ready for a phone upgrade. If not, you probably don't care enough about the OS version.

 

How often do you guys that claim to be interested in the latest and greatest software upgrade your phones? Are you using 3 or 4 year old phones, just wanting software updates even though the hardware of the phone is so far out of date? It just seems to me like the group that cares about software updates would usually be similar to the group that cares about hardware updates and it would be more of a talking point and less of an actual issue.

So far out of date?

 

Honestly, there isn't a whole lot of movement in phone hardware. Especially now that is has, for all intents and purposes, plateaued. Sure, there are the users who want the latest and greatest phone just because its manufactured date is newer than their old phone, but the majority don't want to upgrade until the additions are useful or their device is performing very poorly. I'd argue that the biggest limits to the majority of users phone lifespan is the wear on the battery and the wear on the NAND. Especially since Android didn't get TRIM support until 4.3.

 

I'll ask you a counter of your question... What features have been added to Android phones in the last year that are must haves?

 

And I ask this as a frequent early adopter... My older handsets usually end up in my wife's hands so I do care about updates lasting more than a year...

 

I'd argue 12 months from the point it is removed from active sale (by the manufacturer) is a reasonable timeframe for updates.  Early adopters will get them for 2 years, late adopters for a minimum of 1 year.

 

I think this is disgusting on the part of HTC.  It's no wonder they are failing in the market.  It's also why I insist to everyone I know who gets wants an Android device, to get a Nexus.

 

 

I can agree with this. I honestly don't understand why OEMs can't offer a standard upgrade time frame like this. Outside of everyone's desire to make you upgrade sooner...

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This is why I go Nexus. My GS4 had a short life span before being replaced by a Nexus 5.

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This is why I go Nexus. My GS4 had a short life span before being replaced by a Nexus 5.

 

I loved my Nexus 4 when I had it, sadly nexus phones always seem to be plauged by the same issues each time. Now that I've gotten the Note 3 I really wouldn't want to get a smaller phone.

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So far out of date?

 

Honestly, there isn't a whole lot of movement in phone hardware. Especially now that is has, for all intents and purposes, plateaued. Sure, there are the users who want the latest and greatest phone just because its manufactured date is newer than their old phone, but the majority don't want to upgrade until the additions are useful or their device is performing very poorly. I'd argue that the biggest limits to the majority of users phone lifespan is the wear on the battery and the wear on the NAND. Especially since Android didn't get TRIM support until 4.3.

 

I'll ask you a counter of your question... What features have been added to Android phones in the last year that are must haves?

 

And I ask this as a frequent early adopter... My older handsets usually end up in my wife's hands so I do care about updates lasting more than a year...

 

 

 

I can agree with this. I honestly don't understand why OEMs can't offer a standard upgrade time frame like this. Outside of everyone's desire to make you upgrade sooner...

Well, I just mean, if you are the kind of person who NEEDS every update, and ASAP, you probably are the kind of person who wants the newest phone as well, no? I honestly don't think that phone hardware has hit that plateau that desktop systems have yet. We're still adding features and massive speed, which is allowing us to use more and more complex apps on our phones. Each year's new CPUs are greatly faster than the previous. I think there's a lot left before we really reach the hardware plateau.

 

That said, we've definitely started to get there. For those who aren't phone nerds, most phones are plenty adequate today. Look at the Moto X. It's a step back on specs, but it's my go to suggestion for family and friends because it still runs great even if it's not cutting edge. We may not quite be at the plateau yet, but we're certainly getting closer.

 

For me, a lot of the drive to update is in displays. A bigger and better display has kept me upgrading. Now we have 1080p as basically a standard on phones. CPUs have gotten ridiculously faster, compare the Snapdragon S4 to the Snapdragon 800. Increased memory has been useful for taking advantage of newer OS features or bigger apps, and overall phone design (I jumped on the N5 because I'd been waiting and complaining for years for someone to make a phone with only onscreen buttons, next I'll be looking for an edge to edge screen). Cameras obviously improve, if that matters to you. If you're asking how the hardware has changed, if you care enough or want/need the features, a LOT has changed in the last year or so. If you just need a simple phone to make calls and texts on and play a few games or apps now and then, then probably the One X would still be fine, but you'd probably also be fine with 4.2 as well.

 

To counter your counter, what software updates have been added to Android in the last year that are must haves? The last few versions of Android, while certainly adding some new features, have been a lot more about polish. The last must have feature for me was Google Now, I believe. Of course, when you're a phone nerd like me, every feature is a must have feature, but I could use 4.2 or probably even 4.1 and have no complaints for the most part. Hell, I was just fixing my friend's Optimus G Pro. That's still on 4.1.2. Certainly new features have been added, but I'd say hardware has evolved far more than software in the last year or two for Android, which is why I say that if you need the latest software so badly, you probably are the kind of person who wants a new phone as well. I understand the cost factor of a new phone though, whereas software is free (to you, obviously not to the company putting man hours in or it wouldn't even be a discussion). To those people I say take a trip to XDA.

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So my wife has an HTC One on Verizon, and is only about 6 months into her contract.  :/

 

This is why you never buy on contract and buy a S3 for $288 (probably cheaper now, that's what I gave somewhere around May) off eBay and install KitKat 4.4 ... benifits

 

1) Great Phone

2) Out of contract

3) Latest Android.

4) Removal Battery

 

I haven't been on a 2 year contract with Verizon since 2007

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