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A mere 5,000 African black rhinos are now estimated to live in the wild, but that isn't stopping a Texas-based group from killing one of the endangered animals. In a closed auction held this weekend, the Dallas Safari Club auctioned off a permit to hunt a rhino in Namibia for a whopping $350,000.

 

The winner of the auction, which was first announced late last year, hasn't been identified. But their bid breaks the previous record for a Namibia black rhino hunting permit ? five of which are doled out by the country each year ? by more than $100,000. Those who purchase the permits are only allowed to hunt from a preselected group of rhinos, largely comprised of older male animals no longer capable of breeding.

 

Despite that caveat, and assurances from the hunting group that proceeds from the auction will go to conservation efforts, the event hasn't exactly been met with plaudits from animal advocacy groups like the Humane Society and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW). "This auction is telling the world that an American will pay anything to kill their species," Jeffrey Flocken of the IFAW told the Associated Press of the event. "This is, in fact, making a spectacle of killing an endangered species."

 

Members of the Dallas Safari Club have defended the auction, largely on the grounds that significant financial resources are required to help save endangered black rhinos. They've also noted that the older males being hunted under the permits tend to become aggressive and territorial, and are often culled by wildlife officials in an effort to protect younger rhinos. "The removal of limited numbers of males has been shown to stimulate population growth in some areas," reads a statement from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, which advised the club on permits required for the auction's winner to import any trophy derived from the hunt. "Removing specific individuals from a population can result in reduced male fighting, shorter calving intervals and reduced juvenile mortality."

 

This particular hunt might be a tightly controlled one, but poachers remain the primary threat to black rhino populations throughout Africa. Rhino horns, often used in medicine, can sell for $30,000 a pound in some regions, and poaching has slashed black rhino populations from around 70,000 in the 1970's. The US government last year launched a $10 million anti-poaching effort to help address the crisis.

 

http://www.theverge.com/2014/1/13/5303860/dallas-safari-club-black-rhino-auction-350000

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Yeah, read about that yesterday... It's disgusting.

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Yeah, read about that yesterday... It's disgusting.

 

Agreed. Whether or not the rhino is to old to breed, still shoudlnt be allowed.  I wonder how many other rhinos are "accidentally" shot instead.

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The permits are issued by Namibia and as the article states are only used to cull from a group of aged males who no longer breed. Don't have a problem with this. The conservation funds raised from the permits are more than any of you contribute to the cause so put up or shut up.

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^ +1

 

It would be so much better to let it die for free.

/s

 

I don't have an issue with this as long as there is independent oversight watching where the funds end up.

 

The better idea would be auctioning off permits to shoot poachers.

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If there's any truth to their claims that these old rhinos are hostile and pose a threat to the younger ones, then I'm perfectly okay with them letting people hunt them.  Between that and the amount of money they bring in from the permits, it sounds to me like a great program.  That's assuming that the plan is followed exactly how it's stated.

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Even if the old bulls did breed their sperm are likely to be of poor quality, which could result in weak offspring. Better to remove them and let the younger bulls compete.

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Culling is fine. Making it a blood sport is not.

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Given its in Africa and the renowned reputed Political back pocketing that goes on when large sums of money are mentioned I have my doubts much of the proceeds will go towards the welfare of the rest of the poor animals.As to the money doing the breed some good ,whats up with actually donating the money simply for their welfare and not for the apparent kudos it may bring the hunters.

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As to the money doing the breed some good ,whats up with actually donating the money simply for their welfare and not for the apparent kudos it may bring the hunters.

 

Because guns, f**k yeah!

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Culling is fine. Making it a blood sport is not.

 

I cannot understand the enjoyment that some people apparently get from taking the lives of large beasts.

Hopefully the $350,000 will be put to good use.

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I cannot understand the enjoyment that some people apparently get from taking the lives of large beasts.

Hopefully the $350,000 will be put to good use.

It's usually a power thing, and in this case it's also an opportunity that's quite rare, making the hunt and the hunter "special". Personally I find the whole thing quite sad. The only redeeming quality in all this is that the money is going to help the rest of the species, but I don't feel that justifies the hunting.

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I cannot understand the enjoyment that some people apparently get from taking the lives of large beasts.

Theodore 'Teddy' Roosevelt apparently enjoy such thing, yeah in bloodsport manners.

theodorehant.jpg Theodore-Roosevelt.jpg.w300h203.jpg

Thats an American President for ya.

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It's usually a power thing,

>

In the vast majority of large animal hunting it's actually a food thing. In N. America moose, elk, whitetail and mule deer, hogs (some >1000 lbs), even bear and 'gators are quite tasty and are very welcome freezer additions. Michigan alone fields over 1 million large game hunters every year.

Our ancestors hunted mastodons & wolly mammoths for meat, and elephants are used by locals in a similar manner. After a "trophy hunt," including for rhino, it's not unusual for the meat to be used by locals for food, rhino legs being roasted for several hours.

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I would guess the revenue generated from that Rhino is at least 3,500,000.

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Nature is more violent than a shot from an .700 nitro express.

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In the vast majority of large animal hunting it's actually a food thing. In N. America moose, elk, whitetail and mule deer, hogs (some >1000 lbs), even bear and 'gators are quite tasty and are very welcome freezer additions. Michigan alone fields over 1 million large game hunters every year.

Our ancestors hunted mastodons & wolly mammoths for meat, and elephants are used by locals in a similar manner. After a "trophy hunt," including for rhino, it's not unusual for the meat to be used by locals for food, rhino legs being roasted for several hours.

You are right. I was narrowly thinking of people like the person who paid $350,000 for the permit; I have a feeling those people don't travel around the world hunting exotic animals because they are hungry.

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The only redeeming quality in all this is that the money is going to help the rest of the species, but I don't feel that justifies the hunting.

 

Don't count on it.  African nations are notoriously corrupt.  Huge amounts of the money the west sends for aid never reaches the people it's meant to help, so what makes you think this money will?

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I hope the winner of the auction is going to accidentally shoot him self as he crosses a fence and nicks his trigger on the wire rail... oh wishful thinking....

 

It's 21st century, why are we "hunting"....  oh yes, killing is the main goal...

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I hope the winner of the auction is going to accidentally shoot him self as he crosses a fence and nicks his trigger on the wire rail... oh wishful thinking....

 

It's 21st century, why are we "hunting"....  oh yes, killing is the main goal...

 

Yes, hopefully he shoots himself. /s

 

Childish remark, isn't it?

 

If you've never been hunting, then you really don't have an opinion.

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If you've never been hunting, then you really don't have an opinion.

 

One of the dumbest things I've read today.  Well done.

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If you've never been hunting, then you really don't have an opinion.

 

Prior experience is not a requirement to judge or form opinions.

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Prior experience is not a requirement to judge or form opinions.

But experience certainly helps put things into a proper context. Otherwise the 'opinion' is all often just poorly informed drivel.

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But experience certainly helps put things into a proper context. Otherwise the 'opinion' is all often just poorly informed drivel.

Just like paedophilia.

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Yes, hopefully he shoots himself. /s

 

Childish remark, isn't it?

 

If you've never been hunting, then you really don't have an opinion.

 

I think you're remark is the more childish tbh.

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