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Sony won't offer option to disable DualShock 4 light bar

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#31 firey

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 02:43

If you turn the controller off manually Netflix pauses, letting it run for 10 minutes just now to check what happens when it automatically goes off (power saving settings).

 

Nothing happens, it just shuts off the controller.  You have to power it back on to use it.  Or at least that's what happened when I used it.  Mine is set to 10 mins auto-shut off.




#32 Shadrack

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 03:14



I dont like bright lights on anything wish there was an off instead of electrical tape fix

 

I agree.  So many LEDs and indicators are covered with electric tape in my house.  I don't see why the hell the television needs a bright light indicating it is on.  If the screen is on, its on... I get indicators for troubleshooting, but thats just poor design.

 

 

When it was later implied such a feature would help extend the controller's battery life, Yoshida added, "The LEDs do not use much battery".

The light bar's primary function is to serve as a trackable beacon for the PlayStation Camera, which provides motion controls similarly to the glowing orb of the PlayStation Move controller for PS3.

 

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#33 HawkMan

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:34

Whoever did these measurements obviously doesn't have a good understanding of circuit design.  That or Sony is atrocious at simple circuit design, but I find that hard to believe.

 

Here's why:

 

The claim is that the LED(s) draw a constant 40-50 mA more when on than off.  That's cool and all, but no intelligent designer will design it that way.  There's a little concept called "persistence of vision" that plays a big part here.  At a certain point, the human eye can't distinguish between when a light is blinking or constant.  Because of this, any smart designer will integrate a timer that will pulse the LEDs with short "blips" such that it looks constant to the human eye.  If you looked at the LED with a high speed camera, I guarantee it blinks. Without doing the math, I'm guessing the summation of the current draw, over the life of the battery, is 75-90% less than the constant 40-50mA that is being claimed here.

 

Ask yourself this:  Why are there so many LED flashlights and toys on the market that use tiny batteries, but yet last for days, months, or even years?  Hmmm... maybe because they use timers to exponentially increase the battery life.

 

ummm all leds blink. always have always will, I'm not even sure a LED can be on constantly, if you look at the rear lights of a car in front of you that's LED, when you look left and right instead of leaving a streak, it will leave dots in your vision. so I'm pretty sure the draw was calculated with the refresh rate of the LED in mind. 



#34 compl3x

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:47

I agree.  So many LEDs and indicators are covered with electric tape in my house.  I don't see why the hell the television needs a bright light indicating it is on.  If the screen is on, its on... I get indicators for troubleshooting, but thats just poor design.

 

 

 

I think my TV has an option to turn off the standby light. I thought that option was pretty common.



#35 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 15:27

ummm all leds blink. always have always will, I'm not even sure a LED can be on constantly, if you look at the rear lights of a car in front of you that's LED, when you look left and right instead of leaving a streak, it will leave dots in your vision. so I'm pretty sure the draw was calculated with the refresh rate of the LED in mind. 

 Uh... no it wasn't calculated with that in mind.  His calculation clearly uses a constant current draw value, which is highly inaccurate since the duty cycle of the PWM signal isn't accounted for.

 

The flicker you see on LED vehicle lights are the same concept.  They control the PWM signal going to the LEDs to minimize the current draw from the battery.  That's the major advantage of using LEDs...

 

So as I said before, any smart designer is going to manipulate the power signal for the LEDs to minimize the cumulative current draw.



#36 neoadorable

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 09:17

got used to the lights on the controller, kinda like them now except of course the trade off is the battery life. the lights don't get in the way or overly reflect on the TV or something, and its not bright enough to hurt when you look at it. An option to turn it off for sure would be nice, but not a must.





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