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Recommend me a decent London based data recovery company (pls)


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#1 ElliottLan

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 20:45

A friends hard drive has failed, no backups etc - it doesn't even power up when i take it out of it's caddy and plug it straight into my motherboard.

So I've tried all the usual stuff and now the only thing left is paying for data recovery... can anyone recommend somewhere in the UK - preferably London - who have a good reputation?

 

 




#2 #Michael

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 21:23

A friends hard drive has failed, no backups etc - it doesn't even power up when i take it out of it's caddy and plug it straight into my motherboard.

So I've tried all the usual stuff and now the only thing left is paying for data recovery... can anyone recommend somewhere in the UK - preferably London - who have a good reputation?

 

One thing that you can try before you do this.  I have done it before and have gotten a dead HD to work long enough to get the important data off of it.  Put the HD in a static free bag (very important to prevent condensation build up) and put it in the freezer for at least an hour.  After that connect it to a different computer and see if that computer will see it as a removable drive.  It may spin up long enough to retrieve a few files.  You may have to repeat this process multiple times.



#3 n_K

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 21:32

Have a google :p.

When I sent a hard drive off about 10 years ago, the quote was £1,000 [student price] (excluding a replacement hard drive to put the data back on), but I wasn't charged as they weren't able to actually fix the drive at all, so you'll be looking at probably more than that these days!



#4 Eric

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 22:25

If it doesn't power up at all it's possible the controller board died. You may be able to buy a used drive of the same model and swap the boards out.

#5 1ON

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 22:42

I know a company based in Tonbridge, Kent who might be able to help. Optimum ITS, speak to Rabah. 01732 368423 :)



#6 +BudMan

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 21:58

I have done it before and have gotten a dead HD to work long enough to get the important data off of it.  Put the HD in a static free bag (very important to prevent condensation build up) and put it in the freezer for at least an hour.



Dispelling the Myth: Freezer Based Hard Drive Data Recovery

#7 He's Dead Jim

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 22:30



Dispelling the Myth: Freezer Based Hard Drive Data Recovery

He didnt bag the drive before he froze it, ;)



#8 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 22:33

<snip>

Dispelling the Myth: Freezer Based Hard Drive Data Recovery

:laugh: Well, that one is completely stupid because he didn't even use anything to try to protect against condensation forming (I think on purpose?). If you wanted to try this properly you'd use an anti-static bag (probably many), remove as much air as possible, and seal it off. It's not perfect because you'd have some water in the air even in the bag and condensation will still form as it is cooling down since there is water in the air when you remove it from the bag, but perhaps not enough to damage the platter? Too bad he didn't show results with something like that. I have no idea whether those precautions would really be enough to not damage it (I'm not a physicist), but he should try to at least show an analogous situation people would actually do.



#9 He's Dead Jim

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 22:38

Put the drive in the airing cupboard so its warm, then seal wrap it in cling film, then freezer, then back in airing cupboard till warm again, then unseal cling film, then spin.... works...


but if you can get another controller board for the drive, I do agree that would be better to try.



#10 +Martog

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 22:51

:laugh: Well, that one is completely stupid because he didn't even use anything to try to protect against condensation forming (I think on purpose?). If you wanted to try this properly you'd use an anti-static bag (probably many), remove as much air as possible, and seal it off. It's not perfect because you'd have some water in the air even in the bag and condensation will still form as it is cooling down since there is water in the air when you remove it from the bag, but perhaps not enough to damage the platter? Too bad he didn't show results with something like that. I have no idea whether those precautions would really be enough to not damage it (I'm not a physicist), but he should try to at least show an analogous situation people would actually do.

 

Honestly if you want to freeze it properly you do it in an environment with no humidity, then would be no risk of condensation.  It's a big risk without a zero humidity environment as anything on those platters could potentially cause irreversible damage.



#11 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 23:41

Honestly if you want to freeze it properly you do it in an environment with no humidity, then would be no risk of condensation.  It's a big risk without a zero humidity environment as anything on those platters could potentially cause irreversible damage.

Most people don't have zero-humidity environment in which to seal a HDD, so I'm not sure how the common person would achieve that. I won't say either way whether it is a substantial risk or not to actually attempt this -- I've no basis to make such a claim since I have no basis to know the likely hood of condensation forming on the platter in such a scenario. That's really the crux of the situation, unless we have evidence or someone who can comment on the likely hood, no-one can really say either way. I suppose you could say there is a large risk in doing something you aren't sure of and that's why I wouldn't try myself. It should be simple enough to show evidence, just repeating the procedure in the video above using a sealed HDD. 

 

EDIT: Also, I'm still not even sure "how" this helps recover data. Does this help the drive spin up again or something? (In googling, I see claims of this supposedly stopping the head from grinding against the platter in broken HDDs, grain of salt though).



#12 xendrome

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 23:43

The freezing trick has worked for me more times then it has not.. 1: it only gives you a few minutes to get data usually before it stops and 2: this won't work for OP since it's not powering up at all...



#13 #Michael

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 23:48

The freezing trick has worked for me more times then it has not.. 1: it only gives you a few minutes to get data usually before it stops and 2: this won't work for OP since it's not powering up at all...

 

It has worked for me many times.  



#14 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 23:55

The freezing trick has worked for me more times then it has not.. 1: it only gives you a few minutes to get data usually before it stops and 2: this won't work for OP since it's not powering up at all...

You know what I'm wondering, what if you ran it while it was in the freezing environment, would that keep it continuously working? Also, any idea as to what the mechanism is that makes this work? I see a-lot of anecdotal evidence for this, but I can't find anything definitive. In your case, are the heads crashing, is the controller malfunctioning, is it bad sectors, etc.?



#15 +BudMan

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 01:17

Be it the guy didn't put the drive in a bag is besides the point... Freezing a drive to recover data is pure and utter FUD plain and simple.. As to those that say it has worked for them.. Pics or it didn't happen!! How long did you freeze it.. You read the tips like this and you have to leave it in there for 12 hours...

How old were these drives?? And as already mentioned clearly not going to work for the OP, since he doesn't even turn on.. If you were having issue reading data - cooling the drive from a HIGH temp in theory could allow for reading of data.

Suggesting anyone put their HDD in a freezer is BAD Advice no matter how you look it.



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