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#16 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 00:40

I think you should buy the Mini and upgrade the RAM yourself.  Maybe even put in a SSD.  It will just be much more convenient than having to mess with the kexts and all that crap.

 

Plus Apple stuff retains value well, so you'll be able to sell it down the line and get a reasonable amount of money back.  I have the 2009 Mini and can still sell it for $250-300, which is pretty crazy considering it's 5 years old.




#17 OP +Nik L

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 00:43

I think this thread has confirmed that I will get an Apple Mac Mini.  I've just watched some videos on installing OEM ram (and not paying Apple's ridiculous prices).  I'd probably swap out the HDD for an SDD too as I don't need storage space (NAS).

 

Thank you to all who contributed.  And for the record, my Dell Mini 10v is a hackintosh, which I DID enjoy tinkering with, I simply no longer have the time or inclination to do so.

 

Thanks



#18 Brian M.

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 00:49

I think this thread has confirmed that I will get an Apple Mac Mini.  I've just watched some videos on installing OEM ram (and not paying Apple's ridiculous prices).  I'd probably swap out the HDD for an SDD too as I don't need storage space (NAS).

 

Thank you to all who contributed.  And for the record, my Dell Mini 10v is a hackintosh, which I DID enjoy tinkering with, I simply no longer have the time or inclination to do so.

 

Thanks

 

Swapping out the ram on the new minis is a 2 minute job. Twist the bottom plate off and it comes right out.

The older ones were absolute you know whats (palette knives and broken clips in abundance!).



#19 Mandosis

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 00:52

That is a good choice. In my experience hackintosh computers are a pain.



#20 Andrew

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 00:52

As a hackintosh user for many years now, I would say it is very fun and easy to do, but not for everyone. When I started out making them it was very messy and a fun learning experience. I wouldn't think twice about making another because I consider myself a seasoned user now who could tackle most hurdles.

 

Saying that, if you rely on this computer for work or don't have time to deal with it as a hobby, stick to the real thing.



#21 Ironman273

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 00:55

I had a hackintosh. It was interesting and I learned some stuff but come update time you rolled the dice whether it would accept it or if it was time to start messing with kexts and drivers.  I have heard that there are hackintoshes now that basically mimic a Mac so there are no concerns with upgrades but I don't remember where I saw it and I can't find it right now.



#22 +Boo Berry

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 01:10

I boot Mac OS X alongside Windows and Ubuntu, and I can't say I've had many problems, mainly incompatible hardware. For example my sound card won't work in Mac so I purchased a USB DAC. Another example is the 780 Ti I have crashes when opening any program that requires OpenCL (Safari, Adobe programs, etc. There's a hack that disables OpenCL for cards, which isn't preferred.

 

Other than that, I do recommend hackintoshes if your hardware's compatible.



#23 #Michael

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 03:11

Just as a fyi and sidenote, the mini never got an upgrade in 2013 and is very much due for an update in 2014.  Rumor has it that it will see an update come March when the iMacs get their annual update.  If you can wait you might want to.



#24 +Medfordite

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 03:39

Having gone from PC to MAC to PC again then I tried a Hackintosh build. 

 

I can speculate that if you have ever owned a MAC and then go to PC then to Hackintosh, you will dump the Hackintosh like I did fast.  The reason for that is while the "Frankenmac" that I had worked well, it simply did not feel the same to me.  It wasn't as fluid, had some minor issues and just wasn't the same for me. 

 

With that said, probably with the right hardware setup, you could do it, but I know that once I get some spare $$ saved up, I'll be plunking it down for a Mini in the future since I have a nice IPS 23" monitor which is beautiful with any OS.  (I run Win 8.1 and Linux on it).  :)



#25 OP +Nik L

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 13:58

Now I just need to wait for the supposed hardware refresh :)



#26 Som

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 14:26

Currenty I have windows 7 64bit, 7 32bit, 8, ubuntu & hackintosh on my pc ... mainly for testing purposes, hardly us any of em except 7 64bit , but just curious... isn't hackintosh illegal? and if it is how is that guy selling them?...



#27 OP +Nik L

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 14:32

isn't hackintosh illegal?

 

Been answered to death.  No it is not illegal.



#28 Brian M.

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 17:09

Currenty I have windows 7 64bit, 7 32bit, 8, ubuntu & hackintosh on my pc ... mainly for testing purposes, hardly us any of em except 7 64bit , but just curious... isn't hackintosh illegal? and if it is how is that guy selling them?...


It's not illegal from a criminal sense. It goes against the EULA, but that's a civil matter, not criminal.

It only becomes illegal if you don't legally purchase OS X, which, given there is no real way to purchase it any more, is a bit of a moot point.

#29 PGHammer

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 19:01

I will say get a hackintosh. You can beat the price almost half by using hardware which are compatible with Mac. Mainly get intel based PC. I have installed Maverick on almost 6 year old desktop on quadcore intel processor and it works flawlessly. I had to get TP-link wireless card though for compatibility. I even upgraded it to SSD and everything working flawlessly. There are many online forum where you can get all the required program to make your own hackintosh. It is very simple and straightforward. I have HP m8120n desktop and everything works without any hitch.

 

The best thing will be you will have much flexibility for future hardware updates with custom built PC rather than getting mini where everything is propriety.

The "Hack" side is not as expensive as you would think.  My current setup does a triple (OS Number Three is Mavericks, in fact), and my upgrade will do the same.  For wired networking, both Realtek and even Intel-based Ethernet are supported (those are the two most common wired LAN solutions on the motherboard side), and most GPU solutions work out of the box (nVidia's case is the strongest, as everything from GTX5xx up is pretty much plug-and-play - I have a GTX550Ti).

 

Hardware specs:

 

Motherboard - current: ASUS P5G41-M LX2/GB  Target: ASUS Z-87A (choice #1) or ASRock Z87 Extreme6 (choice #2)

CPU - current: Intel Core2Quad Q6600 (Kentsfield) Target: Intel i5-4670K (Haswell)

RAM -  current: 4 GB DDR2-800 Target: 8 GB DDR3-1333 (already purchased)

GPU -  current: nVidia GTX550Ti  Target: ASUS GTX760 DirectCU II (choice #1) or EVGA GTX760 Superclocked (choice #2) or PNY GTX760 (choice #3)

 

And there are problems (specifically, issues with drive corruption) that occur with surprising frequency on real Macs that Hack users can fix far easier than real Mac users.  (I mentioned elsewhere that fixing drive corruption - which even OS X is not immune to - requires dropping all the way to the command line.  There is no GUI-based fix for this issue - which all versions of OS X are vulnerable to.  Worse, it's not the only problem that OS X has that requires CLI experience to fix.  If you have any experience at all with a command-line (such as Linux or Windows, or especially BSD), there's surprisingly little different in the OS X CLI/terminal environment compared to BSD; however, despite that, it's something that Apple discourages.)



#30 PGHammer

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 19:09

I boot Mac OS X alongside Windows and Ubuntu, and I can't say I've had many problems, mainly incompatible hardware. For example my sound card won't work in Mac so I purchased a USB DAC. Another example is the 780 Ti I have crashes when opening any program that requires OpenCL (Safari, Adobe programs, etc. There's a hack that disables OpenCL for cards, which isn't preferred.

 

Other than that, I do recommend hackintoshes if your hardware's compatible.

Sound is, in fact, the biggest bugbear on the "Hack" side - and it's also where Apple is the most closed.  The easiest non-Apple workaround for audio (VoodooHDA) supports a wide variety of both onboard audio on motherboard and HDMI on GPUs; however, it does have issues with third-party audio cards (Creative SoundCore - from the current Sound Blaster Z back to the first-generation PCI-E cards, such as Recon3D and X-Fi Titanium) despite the USB headphones with the same DSP working just fine.