Jump to content



Photo

Network Setup, Everything is be routed through a T1

Answered Go to the full post

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 fusi0n

fusi0n

    The Crazy One

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 08-July 04
  • OS: OSX 10.9
  • Phone: iPhone 5S 64GB

Posted 04 February 2014 - 13:34

I have bit of a situation here, and I don't know the best way to tackle it..

I have a DSL Line that is 1.5Meg, in the remote office, and it goes through to T1 back to the main office. The DC is also at the main office. I plan to get a secondary domain here.. The issue is, the internet is horribly slow and needs to be fixed. I can upgrade our DSL line to 10 or 25meg, however I don't think we see a difference because we would be bottlenecked by the T1. The T1 also handles our backups and some of the fileshares..  Ideally, we would just break away from that office network wise all together and do all of the backups and drive shares locally. That is my plan for the future, however right now, that isn't an option.. 

So, is there a way for the internet not to be routed back through their T1 but leave it be for the local resources? I think it is a Cisco 2600 router. I will try to get as much details as possible if needed.. 



Best Answer +BudMan , 04 February 2014 - 13:56

Sure its quite possible to route internet out your own local connection vs back to home office over the T1.  Just need to created the more specific routes of the networks at the home office or that are available through that connection.  And then point your default route at your remote location down your new faster internet pipe.

 

As to DNS queries and dhcp.. Well I would assume he is serving local dhcp - but that has nothing to do with internet access.  As to dns queries - his AD queries are not related to internet queries.. But sure on his local dns, I would point it to internet dns so it uses his new local internet vs forwarding to say his home AD to have it forward or query roots, etc.

 

So reread you have no onsite DC?  Where do you query dns?  I have to assume your AD dns if your local devices are members of your AD.  That you don't want to mess up..  You could run local DNS, that has NS records for your AD dns to solve that problem.. So all AD related goes to AD, while other public dns would go out your local internet connection to a public/ISP dns server, etc.

Go to the full post



#2 Praetor

Praetor

    ASCii / ANSi Designer

  • Tech Issues Solved: 3
  • Joined: 05-June 02
  • Location: Lisbon
  • OS: Windows Eight dot One dot One 1!one

Posted 04 February 2014 - 13:52

why don't you implement a branch DC on the remote site, so you can offload some of the tasks from the main office into the remote office? If that's not viable right now then all of you DNS and DHCP requests are done in the main office, which slows things down.



#3 +BudMan

BudMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 86
  • Joined: 04-July 02
  • Location: Schaumburg, IL
  • OS: Win7, Vista, 2k3, 2k8, XP, Linux, FreeBSD, OSX, etc. etc.

Posted 04 February 2014 - 13:56   Best Answer

Sure its quite possible to route internet out your own local connection vs back to home office over the T1.  Just need to created the more specific routes of the networks at the home office or that are available through that connection.  And then point your default route at your remote location down your new faster internet pipe.

 

As to DNS queries and dhcp.. Well I would assume he is serving local dhcp - but that has nothing to do with internet access.  As to dns queries - his AD queries are not related to internet queries.. But sure on his local dns, I would point it to internet dns so it uses his new local internet vs forwarding to say his home AD to have it forward or query roots, etc.

 

So reread you have no onsite DC?  Where do you query dns?  I have to assume your AD dns if your local devices are members of your AD.  That you don't want to mess up..  You could run local DNS, that has NS records for your AD dns to solve that problem.. So all AD related goes to AD, while other public dns would go out your local internet connection to a public/ISP dns server, etc.



#4 JonnyLH

JonnyLH

    I say things.

  • Joined: 15-February 13
  • Location: UK
  • OS: W8, W7, WP8, iOS, Ubuntu
  • Phone: Nokia Lumia 920

Posted 04 February 2014 - 14:03

So you're own personal line is a 1.5Mbps DSL line and the inter-connect between offices is a T1?

 

Considering your connecting to the remote office, can't you VPN to the main office? If not, the bottleneck is always going to lie within in the T1. Considering you're running backups over it and drive shares, wouldn't it be a better investment to upgrade that line? It's heavy usage for such a small small channel.



#5 majortom1981

majortom1981

    The crazy one

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 30-November 01

Posted 04 February 2014 - 14:17

Are the t-1 and dsl line through the same company ? If they are why don't you drop the t-1 and use that money to make the dsl line even faster. then just vpn the two offices together. Considering you are in the south you can probably get a business cable connection also and use that to replace your t-1. this way you have two connections. one could be used to vpn the two offices together and one as the actual internet connection.



#6 OP fusi0n

fusi0n

    The Crazy One

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 08-July 04
  • OS: OSX 10.9
  • Phone: iPhone 5S 64GB

Posted 04 February 2014 - 15:17

I think I have this figured out now. Thanks Budman!! It's a new company and trying to get all of this straighten out.. 



#7 +BudMan

BudMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 86
  • Joined: 04-July 02
  • Location: Schaumburg, IL
  • OS: Win7, Vista, 2k3, 2k8, XP, Linux, FreeBSD, OSX, etc. etc.

Posted 05 February 2014 - 14:13

As to your backups over your t1 - I would think your daily file changes should not be an issue, but more when you do a full..  Depending on what sort of new file sizes your creating every day that could get to be a issue with only t1.

 

As to vpn to home office over the new higher speed internet connection.  Yeah can always work too for a speed bump, depending on what the upload of the internet connection is and what the home office has for internet and how much of that pipe they are using, etc.

 

You will find many companies using vpn over cheaper internet connection to interconnect their offices vs leased or even mpls connections.  It is very budget friendly way to connect.  But can bring its own pain as well.