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Keeping dust out of my console?


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#16 Aheer.R.S.

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 14:21

My pc, I open the side panel and vaccuum, my ps3, I vaccuumed the vents once the whole time I had it, now my son has it, haven't cleaned my ps4 yet.
But I trust it should be sufficient, unless you're comfortable in opening your console to clean it


#17 Andrew

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Posted 11 February 2014 - 14:22

It gets dust out of consoles. Believe me.  :laugh: It gets dust out of everything, honestly. It is almost to good. The thing is a beast. I have to pretty much bring everything outside when I do it.

 

That is crazy it is so much overseas though. Really is. Hell I can probably buy it for you guys and ship it much cheaper.

 

That's pretty impressive then (Y) Compressed air cans definitely aren't able to do that. Want one even more now lol.

 

I've heard it's prone to fault though. How long have you had yours? Any issues with it?



#18 vetDirtyLarry

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 00:03

That's pretty impressive then (Y) Compressed air cans definitely aren't able to do that. Want one even more now lol.

 

I've heard it's prone to fault though. How long have you had yours? Any issues with it?

Have had it over a year now. January 4th of 2013 to be exact (love Amazon order history).
The one and only issue I have had with it is it fell off of a 7 foot shelf, which was 110% my fault, and the plastic handled cracked, but only cracked, did not even break. I just duct taped it back together and it is good as new. So not sure what issues others may be having with it, but mine is rock solid.



#19 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 01:41

Have had it over a year now. January 4th of 2013 to be exact (love Amazon order history).
The one and only issue I have had with it is it fell off of a 7 foot shelf, which was 110% my fault, and the plastic handled cracked, but only cracked, did not even break. I just duct taped it back together and it is good as new. So not sure what issues others may be having with it, but mine is rock solid.

I hope that you've done the appropriate method of amazon reviewing and knocked a star off on the rating for the crack  :D



#20 AR556

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 02:01

I just gave this advice in another thread, but vacuums generate a lot of static electricity.

 

Also, you also want to be careful to not cause any fan in the system to spin because you can cause it to generate electricity via electromagnetic induction.

Don't vacuum any fan unless you can stop the blades turning. You'll **** the bearings as well as the point Snaphat mentioned.

 

Compressed air is only really useful if you can open it up. Otherwise you'll just be blowing dust around inside the top case. Both the 360 and X1 have enclosed chassis so compressed air simply won't do anything.

 

Best thing you can do is just clean the immediate area more frequently than the rest of your home. Or make sure there is at least more air flow in that area so dust can't settle easy.

 

 

I'm sorry, but i don't believe for a second that vacuuming through the vents of a console will mess up the fans or the console in any way. Bearings are round. They don't care what direction they spin. Even when cleaning out PC's I spin the hell out of the fans with a compressor and no problems there, ever. Considering I've been using a vacuum on my PS2, Xbox and my 360 and have never experienced a fan failure is proof enough for me. Keep in mind, I don't open the console up, just hold the hose up to the vents. If they didn't make it so difficult to do, I'd simply open them up and use an air compressor with a dryer attached (for moisture) or use a can of air.



#21 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 03:34

I'm sorry, but i don't believe for a second that vacuuming through the vents of a console will mess up the fans or the console in any way. Bearings are round. They don't care what direction they spin. Even when cleaning out PC's I spin the hell out of the fans with a compressor and no problems there, ever. Considering I've been using a vacuum on my PS2, Xbox and my 360 and have never experienced a fan failure is proof enough for me. Keep in mind, I don't open the console up, just hold the hose up to the vents. If they didn't make it so difficult to do, I'd simply open them up and use an air compressor with a dryer attached (for moisture) or use a can of air.

Personally, I'm not qualified to make an assessment on the mechanical stress aspect of it.

 

I was just giving an electrical analysis on the system: in general a motor is a generator when operated in reverse. In this case, the motor is a brushless permanent magnet and coiled wire (solenoid). If operated in reverse it would generate AC current into the solenoid. For example, PC fans can be modified to be used as turbines: http://www.scraptopo.../upcycle-pc-fan ; http://dossant.com/p...fan-generator/. So it stands to reason that if you cause high spinning in the fan in your PC, you could backfeed electricity into the system by inducing a current in the solenoid. Of course this isn't a generator that could be used for anything useful in unmodified form: it would would just feedback the AC current into the control circuits of the fan and possibly elsewhere (this is why modification has to be done to bypass the circuitry and possibly to add a rectifier to convert to DC current in the examples). 

I doubt in the case of the gaming systems that you are actually causing any form of rapid movement in the fan enough to generate significant current. That being said, it seems to me you could easily do this with an exposed fan and a powerful vacuum with a large hose. I haven't tried it myself though because I'm not keen on testing my systems just to see if I can damage them through applied EM :laugh: You can take what I'm saying with a grain of salt if you want, but it is backed up by sound electromagnetic theory.



#22 Andrew

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 11:47

I'm sorry, but i don't believe for a second that vacuuming through the vents of a console will mess up the fans or the console in any way. Bearings are round. They don't care what direction they spin. Even when cleaning out PC's I spin the hell out of the fans with a compressor and no problems there, ever. Considering I've been using a vacuum on my PS2, Xbox and my 360 and have never experienced a fan failure is proof enough for me. Keep in mind, I don't open the console up, just hold the hose up to the vents. If they didn't make it so difficult to do, I'd simply open them up and use an air compressor with a dryer attached (for moisture) or use a can of air.

 

Vacuums cause the fans to spin faster than they would when controlled by the PC and/or console. The fact you've gotten away with it is just sheer luck, not proof. Even if you can stop them spinning then there is still risk of static build up.



#23 D. S.

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:07

I've wanted to get a Datavac for ages but it's just too expensive. I could buy a small air compressor for what it costs on Amazon UK.



#24 AR556

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 14:11

Vacuums cause the fans to spin faster than they would when controlled by the PC and/or console. The fact you've gotten away with it is just sheer luck, not proof. Even if you can stop them spinning then there is still risk of static build up.

Have you witnessed a fan failure that is the direct result of using a vacuum? Have you fried a console from static electricity originating from vacuuming the console vents from the outside? If you have, then I stand corrected.



#25 Andrew

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 15:17

Have you witnessed a fan failure that is the direct result of using a vacuum? Have you fried a console from static electricity originating from vacuuming the console vents from the outside? If you have, then I stand corrected.

 

Have I witnessed it? Yes. Have I done it personally? No.

 

Why would I offer advice I'd don't even follow for myself? I also don't do things half assed. When I clean something I take it apart to do so. You're not going to suck out all the dust from a 360/X1 through the chasis never mind the gaps in the fan blades. If you'd actually opened one before (especially an old model that's never been cleaned), you'd understand. Same goes for the PS3. The fat models have more layers than Dell laptops (N). If you think you're cleaning it efficiently or suitably through the fans then you really haven't a clue. The old 360 models have a plastic shield that funnels the air straight to the HSF. You're not even collecting dust from the rest of the innards :no:



#26 AR556

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 15:46

Have I witnessed it? Yes. Have I done it personally? No.

 

Why would I offer advice I'd don't even follow for myself? I also don't do things half assed. When I clean something I take it apart to do so. You're not going to suck out all the dust from a 360/X1 through the chasis never mind the gaps in the fan blades. If you'd actually opened one before (especially an old model that's never been cleaned), you'd understand. Same goes for the PS3. The fat models have more layers than Dell laptops (N). If you think you're cleaning it efficiently or suitably through the fans then you really haven't a clue. The old 360 models have a plastic shield that funnels the air straight to the HSF. You're not even collecting dust from the rest of the innards :no:

Neither of us can prove otherwise, but I seriously doubt you've witnessed a fan failure due to vacuuming, or a an ESD induced failure from the same. I'm not advocating doing anything "half-assed", but if you vacuum through the vents on a console once a month, you're not going to see major build-up inside the console.

 

My preference is to take things apart also, but as mentioned, console makers tend to make that a PITA because of what they think you might do if average Joe opens up his box. My PC's as well as those I repair for others are opened up and cleaned with compressed air as they should be. No, I don't immobilize the fan blades and no, I've never caused or witnessed damage because of it. Maybe if you continuously spun the blades it might be a problem, but not for the duration required to blow the dust off them. If you smoke, then its a different situation, because the dust is made sticky by the cigarette smoke. Damn near impossible to clean off then.



#27 +Audioboxer

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 19:43

I usually vacuum for a year, then once the warranty is out the window open up the console myself every 3-6 months for a clean. The dust and dirt that sticks to the fans is NOT coming out with a vacuum.

 

Only thing you can really do is keep your environment clean, and that will help.



#28 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 19:52

Have you witnessed a fan failure that is the direct result of using a vacuum? Have you fried a console from static electricity originating from vacuuming the console vents from the outside? If you have, then I stand corrected.

There are anecdotal reports of these things online: how about opening the console and vacuuming the circuit board and fans directly and report back to us so we can confirm  :innocent:  :p Personally, I think you are rather unlikely to get damage if are vacuuming from the outside because most things are shielded and such.

 

My preference is to take things apart also, but as mentioned, console makers tend to make that a PITA because of what they think you might do if average Joe opens up his box. My PC's as well as those I repair for others are opened up and cleaned with compressed air as they should be. No, I don't immobilize the fan blades and no, I've never caused or witnessed damage because of it. Maybe if you continuously spun the blades it might be a problem, but not for the duration required to blow the dust off them. If you smoke, then its a different situation, because the dust is made sticky by the cigarette smoke. Damn near impossible to clean off then.

 

compressed air is not going to spin them rapidly. You would really need a vacuum to do that. Just as if you spun them by hand, you wouldn't generate a significant current.



#29 AR556

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 20:00

There are anecdotal reports of these things online: how about opening the console and vacuuming the circuit board and fans directly and report back to us so we can confirm  :innocent:  :p

 

 

compressed air is not going to spin them rapidly. You would really need a vacuum to do that. Just as if you spun them by hand, you wouldn't generate a significant current.

I wouldn't use a vacuum directly on a circuit board. I use an an actual air compressor with a moisture filter attached most of the time. Canned air is expensive in the quantities that I'd use it.



#30 +techbeck

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 20:04

Best thing you can do is make sure it is not sitting on carpet.  Other than that, not much other than blowing it out occasionally.  I lived in AZ for 15 years and never had a problem with dust really.  The original 360 I had had to be repaired after 6yrs. RROD.  Guy who did it said I had the cleanest XBOX hes seen for the age and hardly any dust inside.  I never blew it out and it was sitting in the open about 3ft off the ground.