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WZOR Talks About Windows (Codename) 9, Is a DP Imminent?

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#511 +Quillz

Quillz

    A Talking Pokemon

  • Joined: 19-July 05
  • Location: Los Angeles, CA
  • OS: Win8
  • Phone: Nexus 5

Posted 13 September 2014 - 17:20

The main thing that bothers me is how many options Win8 took away. You can't alter the font, the title bar color, etc. (At least, not easily... Some things are still possible via Registry edits). And I can't figure out for the life of me why these decisions were made. You've been able to change the font of, say, icons and title bars since... Windows 1.0? Likewise, in Win8, using black window chrome is almost impossible because the title bar text is hardcoded to be black, making it unreadable. Why these things can't be altered, I have no idea.

 

Win9 should introduce customization as a "new" feature.




#512 Gabe84

Gabe84

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 21-May 14

Posted 13 September 2014 - 17:34

By insisting on relegating it to touch devices, you are ignoring the usefulness of ModernUI - even without touch support - for the everyday PC user.

 

While ModernUI has better support for touch than the "standard" desktop UI, IS there a "standard" desktop UI?

 

From what I have seen (merely going from XP to Windows 7), there isn't.

 

There are more desktop-application UIs than there are application companies - how many different UIs are there just within Microsoft Office?

 

Throw in other companies and their desktop applications, and you have a horrible hodgepodge.

 

ModernUI basically hits the reset button on application UIs - there is a single set of core UI elements that are mandatory.  Even better, ModernUI doesn't discriminate - you don't need touch support for a ModernUI application. (You don't need mouse support, either - much to my own shock.)

 

However, if you are used to having to rely on having a pointing device - whether it is your preference or not - NOT having to rely on it is a shake-up factor.

 

ModernUI is elegant, simple, and practically utilitarian.  It isn't like we haven't seen such elegance before - however, nowadays, it's uncommon - especially in terms of desktop software for Windows.  (It IS common enough on OS X - especially in terms of third-party software.  However, even on OS X, the trend is toward "busier" UIs.)

 

The complaints about "aesthetics" - which started with the Developer Preview of Windows 8 - are more about that sea-change that ModernUI itself represents.  ModernUI bucks the complication trend by being simple.  It's not that simple doesn't work; however, simple is more common in a MOBILE setting (smartphones, tablets, etc.) - hence the semi-deliberate dismissal of ModernUI as being a tablet/touch-centric UI.

 

Here is my response - why does an application UI have to be complicated?

It's just a matter of personal tastes, personally I don't like flat design in general, be it Windows 9 or Yosemite, I find it too simple, childish, something I think it's more appropriate in a children's book.

 

Luckily we're talking about Windows, so I'm sure there will be plenty of options regarding UI customization.



#513 PGHammer

PGHammer

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 31-August 03
  • Location: Accokeek, MD
  • OS: Windows 8 Pro with Media Center x64

Posted 14 September 2014 - 00:42

Most mainstream OS's have followed suit with the "flat ,dull, boring look" as you call it.  And they ALL look better for doing so IMO.

Most DO, in fact, look better -- in the case of Yosemite, it is decidedly flatter and more elegant than Mavericks.  There is also a performance advantage for a flat UI compared to a fancy or "busy" UI - it was first noticed with Android KitKat (compared to ICS) and Windows 8 was flatter compared to 7 (which was something complained about) - however, there were some performance gains with the flatter UI compared to 7 as well.  The performance improvements are more noticeable with non-desktop hardware (mostly in the form of improved battery life) - however, desktops also benefit.

 

However, too many desktop users could care less about lower energy costs.



#514 Defcon

Defcon

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 20-November 02

Posted 16 September 2014 - 05:37

The main thing that bothers me is how many options Win8 took away. You can't alter the font, the title bar color, etc. (At least, not easily... Some things are still possible via Registry edits). And I can't figure out for the life of me why these decisions were made. You've been able to change the font of, say, icons and title bars since... Windows 1.0? Likewise, in Win8, using black window chrome is almost impossible because the title bar text is hardcoded to be black, making it unreadable. Why these things can't be altered, I have no idea.

 

Win9 should introduce customization as a "new" feature.

The answer is simple - blame Sinofsky.



#515 PGHammer

PGHammer

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 31-August 03
  • Location: Accokeek, MD
  • OS: Windows 8 Pro with Media Center x64

Posted 18 September 2014 - 20:03

The answer is simple - blame Sinofsky.

I don't blame Sinofsky - but then, unlike a lot of the enterprise users, I also liked Windows 8 as it was.

 

In fact, I just added another Dead Hardware Express PC that is now running Windows 8.1 ProWMC - the difference is that this one is portable.  It is also the oldest PC - of any sort - that I have installed Windows 8 x64 (or 7 x64 for that matter) on.

 

The portable in question is the HP Pavilion 9700 Altec Lansing Edition.  (This is the portable that the Envy with Beats Audio replaced in HP's portable lineup.)

 

This particular model has an AMD Turion x64 CPU, a decidedly atypical nForce Mobile chipset (even then, nForce Mobile chipsets were uncommon in Turion-driven portables), and a trainload of portable-media options - which you would need, as the typical HDD in this media-driven notebook is all of 150 GB (including restore partition).

 

Despite the age (it's older than the tower PC I just replaced the motherboard in), I had no problems at all getting it up and running with 8.1.  (None whatever - I actually started with the notebook in wireless - not wired - mode; I couldn't have done so installing Windows Vista, for example - and that was the original default OS.)

 

The super-small HDD doesn't bother me - I'll be using this portable as an e-mail and workbook portable - the porkiest application going on it is Microsoft Office.  Besides, if I ever feel cramped, I CAN always throw a 512 GB Crucial SSD (either MX100 or m4) in it; either one is no worse than $200 retail.  (To put the size in perspective, that is three times the size of the HDD it came with.)