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#1 +ultimate99

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 14:06

When you guys develop using for example, Visual Studio or MS SQL server, do you do it directly on your system or use a vm specifically for that?




#2 Eric

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 14:21

I install it directly. If you're targeting a different version of Windows that supports only older libraries you can just set up the project to target them instead.

#3 Max Norris

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 14:25

Depends on how much you need/use it really.  Personally I have a couple Windows Servers here, one has MSSQL on it already so no need here, plus I use VS2013 pretty much daily for work (among other tools), so that's a "real" install for me obviously.  The IDE lets you target different versions of the platforms as needed too so it's not like you have to for backwards compatibility.. of course if you're using Windows 7 and you need to target Windows 8.x, then a Windows 8 VM will be required.  But if it's just something for curiosity's sake or a once-and-done thing or just not sure if you want to use it, a VM wouldn't be out of the question sure.  Both are rather large, shoot my documentation library alone is pushing 7GB.. if you decide later you don't want/need it cleanup is that much easier.



#4 +Majesticmerc

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 22:26

For me, it depends.

The actual environment I use for writing code I'll install directly. So Visual Studio, Eclipse, and such all get installed locally.

I do tend to virtualize my testing environments though. I don't enjoy the idea of having a full WAMP stack running when I'm writing my web code, nor do I want the ton of dependencies that come with it. For that, I'd rather just set up a sandbox emulating a production environment. That way, when the test environment needs changing, I can isolate my changes to inside the VM, and when I'm finished entirely with a test environment, delete the entire virtual machine. I also have much more fine grained control over the test VM, such as designating the amount of RAM or number of CPU's it can use.

#5 Brian M.

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 22:42

I usually virtualise stuff, so that I can experiment with crap without messing up my local install. Each VM has dev and staging config, with (most of my work is in python) different virtualenvs for each.

#6 vhane

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 01:47

For server based apps, I prefer to virtualise the environments. It's better to run a development configuration that is similar to production. Plus virtualisation has a bunch of advantages. VMs are portable/shareable, you don't need to pollute your workstation OS with stuff that you need for one project but not for another, you get snapshots and rollbacks, you can reinstall your workstation OS / move computers without losing your development configuration etc. etc.

 

For client apps, it's usually just a matter of installing an IDE, cloning the repo and I'm good to go. No need to virtualise the development environment there.



#7 firey

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 02:50

depends.. 99% of it is native on windows.  Though I do some mono-develop/c++ on a virtual debian install.



#8 OP +ultimate99

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 14:06

Let's say I'm still in the learning process and working on a single project; mainly XML and SQL, recommended that I create a vm for that?



#9 +riahc3

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 14:16

Hello,

When you guys develop using for example, Visual Studio or MS SQL server, do you do it directly on your system or use a vm specifically for that?

You develop things using VS. MSSQL (GUI) is used for queries and not much else.

I do it locally.

#10 firey

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 14:18

Let's say I'm still in the learning process and working on a single project; mainly XML and SQL, recommended that I create a vm for that?

 

do it locally.. better than trying to deal with vm's.  



#11 vhane

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 15:26

Let's say I'm still in the learning process and working on a single project; mainly XML and SQL, recommended that I create a vm for that?

 

Locally will do.



#12 Skiver

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 15:31

To my knowledge, most of the developers I work with develop on their laptops and test virtually.



#13 sbauer

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 14:32

I prefer to develop in a VM, even if the VM OS is the same as my native OS. Makes life a lot easier.



#14 +Majesticmerc

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 14:37

I prefer to develop in a VM, even if the VM OS is the same as my native OS. Makes life a lot easier.

 

How so? (Not judging, just curious).



#15 sbauer

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 14:51

How so? (Not judging, just curious).

I like clean, separate environments. Once I setup an environment for VS2013, I'll take an image of it. That will then be my base environment. If I have to do work on a different project/client, and I think a clean environment would benefit, I'll just create a VM from my base image. 

 

Sometimes I'll have projects that have strange dependencies on garbage products. Instead of polluting my machine with them, I'd rather just create a VM for it. I don't have to worry about conflicts or issues caused because that was installed on my machine and it wasn't installed on a test machine. 





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