31 posts in this topic

Depending on the setup.. See all the websites you've been too, how long, how much bandwidth you used.. pretty much can see anything network application run such has Remote Desktop to uTorrent. Some places have VNC installed, they could just pop in any second and see your screen and you would never know they are even in it.. If they have a Mobile Device Management, they can see your call log, text, current location, how fast you are driving.. Just depending on how much they have put in place.. 

 

Not on a personal device connected to Wifi I assume ? When I have a HTTPS connection to a website, I expect that all anyone can see is a bunch of encrypted packets going to and from the website.

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They can also see the page you are on...can't do much about the content of the page. If they didn't push a policy to you phone based on their network access control, if they did you may not know what they pushed out and what it can do.

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I think you should be safe on https:// pages - even if they did capture and analyze packets, it would just appear as scrambled data on their end.

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You think that that is all they can do? Don't work in IT do you? I can tell you I have put in systems that do way more than packet capture unbeknownst to the end user, if I wanted to I could pull up you bank account id and password if you used on of our computers to access you bank account, I could even give you screen shots of your bank totals as you view those pages.I could also give video capture of everything you did 10 minutes before, during, and after lunch.

You don't want it to be known, don't use corporate computers.

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Here's the bottom line, they aren't going to bother spying on you because that ends up costing money...they would just get rid of you if they thought something was up (unless it came to corporate security). Those policies are in place for the BYOD generation and there's not really a sure fire way around it without risking leaks.

 

My technicians know that if they leave my company their devices will be remotely wiped if they do so without warning and agree to it in the employee handbook before they even begin work. We have SSN, Credit Card Information, Contacts, etc that are accessible at any time. If they leave with a two week notice then they are allowed to backup their personal data and then wipe the device in front of someone authorized to verify it - it's not that we want that policy, it's because we HAVE to have that in place for liability sake. Can you imagine the CEO of a Multi-Billion dollar business contacting you when a term'ed employee uses a SSN/CC to go shopping?

 

 

You CAN set permissions on your work calendar. You can make it to where if you set your appointments details to private that others around you can't see the details (only that you aren't there). You're lucky to be able to access both calendars on site like that because most corporations wouldn't allow it (it's too easy to just start migrating data over, that's the risk).

 

In the end, everything is visible when it flows through the backbone. If you access it from home, your details will become visible because more than likely you'll be proxying into the server to access said accounts (especially with Exchange 2013). If you're really THAT cautious, ask your employer for another device that purely carries your work data and nothing else, that prevents a BYOD scenario.

 

EDIT: EndPoint Management means that we can see your screens without you knowing. HTTPS means zero if you're linked in to the network.

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Here's the bottom line, they aren't going to bother spying on you because that ends up costing money...they would just get rid of you if they thought something was up (unless it came to corporate security). Those policies are in place for the BYOD generation and there's not really a sure fire way around it without risking leaks.

 

My technicians know that if they leave my company their devices will be remotely wiped if they do so without warning and agree to it in the employee handbook before they even begin work. We have SSN, Credit Card Information, Contacts, etc that are accessible at any time. If they leave with a two week notice then they are allowed to backup their personal data and then wipe the device in front of someone authorized to verify it - it's not that we want that policy, it's because we HAVE to have that in place for liability sake. Can you imagine the CEO of a Multi-Billion dollar business contacting you when a term'ed employee uses a SSN/CC to go shopping?

 

 

You CAN set permissions on your work calendar. You can make it to where if you set your appointments details to private that others around you can't see the details (only that you aren't there). You're lucky to be able to access both calendars on site like that because most corporations wouldn't allow it (it's too easy to just start migrating data over, that's the risk).

 

In the end, everything is visible when it flows through the backbone. If you access it from home, your details will become visible because more than likely you'll be proxying into the server to access said accounts (especially with Exchange 2013). If you're really THAT cautious, ask your employer for another device that purely carries your work data and nothing else, that prevents a BYOD scenario.

 

EDIT: EndPoint Management means that we can see your screens without you knowing. HTTPS means zero if you're linked in to the network.

 

That is exactly what we do here at my company.  Sure we can do all of that and more but that costs us time and money.  We truly don't care what is on your BYOD device...we care about maintaining the integrity of the corporate data.  The same goes for what is on the computer.  That is why each and every employee agrees to the acceptable use policy/cisp when they are hired.  That is also why the BYOD program isn't all that popular...most are very happy with a corporate provided phone.  Those that do use the BYOD program are told very clearly that we DO not do a full device wipe but rather an enterprise wipe...thus leaving their personal data intact.  The AUP/cisp clearly states that all usage on the corporate network is subject to monitoring...including personal email accounts.

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