14 posts in this topic

On Jan. 5, 2012, Paul Valin called the police to report he'd found a backpack containing what he believed to be meth-making equipment. That simple act of good citizenship landed his and wife Cindy's house on the National Clandestine Laboratory Register, the federal Drug Enforcement Agency's list of meth labs.

The NCLR "contains addresses of some locations where law enforcement agencies reported they found chemicals or other items that indicated the presence of either clandestine drug laboratories or dumpsites."

The fact that Valin found the backpack more than 15 miles from his house isn't the sort of thing the DEA or any other division of the Department of Justice would have checked on before publishing his address on the NCLR.

According to the NCLR website: "In most cases ... the Department has not verified the entry and does not guarantee its accuracy....The Department does not accept responsibility or liability for damages of any kind resulting from reliance on an entry".

Unlike the DOJ, Paul Valin is willing to accept responsibility. And that's how his trouble started.

 

Valin sent an email to the DEA explaining the facts of his case and asking that his address be removed from the NCLR. The reply he received three weeks later was not encouraging.

 

According to the email, the only way to be removed from the NCLR is to have the law enforcement agency that originally submitted the address request it be removed or have ?the local health agency? send an email to the DEA stating the property is free from any contamination associated with meth production.

more

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What moronic policies

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let that be a lesson boys and girls....find a bag of meth making material, best to throw it in someone else's yard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ I do that with dead bodies too. :s

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ I do that with dead bodies too. :s

Is that why they keep showing up here.  Damn it man. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ I do that with dead bodies too. :s

So that's where the body came from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they don't require any burden of proof to place a residence on this list, then I suppose someday a malicious person will start reporting random addresses...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they don't require any burden of proof to place a residence on this list, then I suppose someday a malicious person will start reporting random addresses...

 

No, they are on the list because an officer submitted a report saying they found (collected) evidence from the address, if no evidence was found then they would not be on the list.

 

The removal procedure seems straight forward anyway, pretty much a non story :s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bury it in a desert just outside of Albuquerque, NM... Maybe Heisenberg can use it to start over

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, they are on the list because an officer submitted a report saying they found (collected) evidence from the address, if no evidence was found then they would not be on the list.

 

The removal procedure seems straight forward anyway, pretty much a non story :s

 

But it wasn't found at the address... It was 15 miles away...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Valuable lesson: Never, ever voluntarily try to help or otherwise give information to the police.

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, so when it is reported that people just 'walk-on-by' when they see or hear things, does not make me think.

 

If I thought about this the thought Police would arrest me.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was a rookie cop mistake. Filed it incorrectly. Nothing more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Valuable lesson: Never, ever voluntarily try to help or otherwise give information to the police.

 

Sadly this is so true. If I found a bunch of drugs I think I'd just keep walking. Sergeant Schultz had it right all along: "I see nothing!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.