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Windows Transfer (SSD to SSD)


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#1 +bman

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 02:53

I have my server computer running on an SSD (the OS) and it turns out, it's a bit small (60GB) and so I want to purchase a larger SSD but need to know if I can transfer everything without issue.

I basically want to unplug old drive, plug in new drive, turn on like nothing happened? Possible, how?




#2 Mindovermaster

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 04:40

Clonezilla



#3 +LogicalApex

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 04:48

Why are you booting a server on an SSD? Or are they being used for an intense VM or DB load?

You need to image the drive to move it without a wipe. Depending on the kit you buy it may come included.

#4 Luc2k

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 04:54

I used Macrium Reflect Free last time without issues.



#5 OP +bman

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 04:56

I say server, because it's storing a bunch of files on many drives for Plex, but it's a bunch of pooled drives, running Windows 8.1. So not a server in a traditional sense.

 

So clone it within one of those, and that clone is put onto the new drive (I assume the softwares run outside of windows...) and its good to go?



#6 +Odom

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 16:05

You can use a tool like Acronis to copy your partition or entire hard drive. Basically clone it to the new one. Then you can simply swap out the drives.

I don't know any free tools that do the same as Acronis.

 

The SSD from Kingston that I purchased was an upgrade bundle. It only cost 5€ more than the version without it, but it came with a small external USB enclosure and an Acronis CD you could boot from. In 20mins I had everything cloned to the new SSD. I swapped out the drives and that was it.



#7 +BudMan

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 16:06

Why would that need a SSD?  It serves up files, so I would assume is on pretty much most of the day if not all of the day.  It is not running interactive applications I wouldn't think?  Seems like odd use of SSD to me, my not just run the OS off one of your pooled drives?  Or just put in a traditional drive and get plenty of space for less money.

 

Are you also using it as a desktop?



#8 farmeunit

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 16:16

I know I wish I would have gotten an SSD for my HTPC.  It also runs Sickbeard, Subsonic, Headphones, AirServer, and several other programs on startup.  I takes a good 5-10 minutes to get everything loaded and up and running.

 

As mentioned, Clonezilla or Macrium Reflect should do the trick.  Both are free.  Should be realitively painless since you're not changing chipsets or going from HDD to SSD. 



#9 +BudMan

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 17:20

"I takes a good 5-10 minutes to get everything loaded and up and running."

 

So?  Your using it as a server are you not - why would you turn it off other than patches..  And I doubt it your HDD that is taking 10 minutes for the box to boot?  Unless there is something wrong with it..



#10 OP +bman

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 18:33

For me it's not for turning on, it's that it is partly used as a desktop, at least how it's being used for a server.

 

I need Plex, Sabnzbd, drive maintenance software and a few others to run as fast as possible. Now I know SSDs improves startup performance mostly, but it makes me feel better.

 

And no one really answered my question, you use the software on the current OS? Where does the clone go to? Then you switch drives, and run the software from a USB stick? Then it goes onto the new drive?

 

I'd assume that would be the case, just want to make sure.



#11 Radium

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 18:59

If the SSD is formatted with GPT then you can format the new SSD the same way, making sure it's GPT. Create the hidden partitions manually and just have the new C drive larger. Once that's done, mount all hidden partitions and start copying the files.

It can all be done with a Windows machine with tools already present inside Windows.

Use DISKPART for partitioning and XCOPY for copying the files.

 

If it's not GPT but MBR, just format the new drive as GPT anyway and just recreate the boot environment for UEFI, if the motherboard supports UEFI.

Create a EFI boot partition at the beginning of the drive, at around 100-500 MB. 100 MB is default in Windows.

If the current drive is MBR then it will be a lot more trickier to get it to boot.

 

Do all this on a separate machine, not the server.

Also, make sure to read through XCOPY parameters before you use it. You would want to use certain parameters, such as O, X, B, K, H, E etc

It's important that you copy all ACL and attribute information, as well as empty directories.

Read through all of it and make sure that it works before you clear the "old" drive.

No need to actually install third party applications or having to pay for anything.

The trickiest thing is if you're using MBR at the moment. In that case, read up on how to create/copy the EFI boot files to the EFI partition. There are files in C:\Windows\Boot, look around while you figure out what files you need to make it boot through UEFI+GPT.

 

If your machine doesn't support GPT, just use MBR. Recreate the partitions the way you want them and once you're done and have copied all the files using XCOPY, use BOOTSECT.EXE.

 

Always read parameters.



#12 farmeunit

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 19:07

"I takes a good 5-10 minutes to get everything loaded and up and running."

 

So?  Your using it as a server are you not - why would you turn it off other than patches..  And I doubt it your HDD that is taking 10 minutes for the box to boot?  Unless there is something wrong with it..

There are instances where we lose power, or the computer locks up.  For a while, CouchPotato would stop running, and the only way I could get it to start was reboot.

 

Not necessarily 10 minutes to just boot, but to get all programs up and running with any noticeable lag running XBMC. 

 

It's my HTPC, torrent box, media server, etc..

 

Running a Core i3 with 8GB or RAM and 2x7200RPM hard drive here. 



#13 PGHammer

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 19:19

I have my server computer running on an SSD (the OS) and it turns out, it's a bit small (60GB) and so I want to purchase a larger SSD but need to know if I can transfer everything without issue.

I basically want to unplug old drive, plug in new drive, turn on like nothing happened? Possible, how?

The process is identical to HDD-to-HDD or efen HDD-to-SSD transfers - as long as the target is larger than the source, it won't be an issue.  In most cases, you can even use the same software to do the transfer (both Acronis TrueImage and Raxco PerfectTransfer (a subset of PerfectDisk) can do the job rather painlessly, and are often included with SSDs or available at zero cost from the drive OEM.)



#14 Luc2k

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 21:39

And no one really answered my question, you use the software on the current OS? Where does the clone go to? Then you switch drives, and run the software from a USB stick? Then it goes onto the new drive?

Macrium runs from within Windows and can clone a partition or whole drive onto another. All you have to do after it's done is restart and change the boot drive. Everything else is identical.



#15 +Medfordite

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 22:33

For me it's not for turning on, it's that it is partly used as a desktop, at least how it's being used for a server.

 

I need Plex, Sabnzbd, drive maintenance software and a few others to run as fast as possible. Now I know SSDs improves startup performance mostly, but it makes me feel better.

 

And no one really answered my question, you use the software on the current OS? Where does the clone go to? Then you switch drives, and run the software from a USB stick? Then it goes onto the new drive?

 

I'd assume that would be the case, just want to make sure.

 

I use CloneZilla myself.  I have Windows 8.1 Pro running on my Laptop.  Here is what I did:

 

Secured external USB drive, or you can use one of your internal ones if you have enough space to do so).

Went into my UEFI settings and disabled the secure boot and put it into legacy mode so it would boot off of the CD-ROM with CloneZilla.

I loaded CloneZilla and told it to clone my drive to my external drive with verify.

 

After it was done, I shut everything down and reverted back to normal. 

 

In your case, you would want to then swap your old drive with the new one, reboot into CloneZilla and do the restore.

 

I have done this several times with my system and it has worked quite well.  Windows has never complained or hiccuped and has run like nothing happened.

 

OR...

 

If you buy a Samsung SSD, they give you drive cloning software from within Windows which is supposed to do basically the same thing but with a prettier GUI.  :)