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Strange static electricity issue


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#16 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

    Electrical & Computer Engineer

  • Tech Issues Solved: 29
  • Joined: 23-August 05
  • OS: Win/Lin/Bsd/Osx
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Posted 05 March 2014 - 23:19

Yeah same here. Many times I can even see sparks and it is painful. I have managed to make a habit of grounding myself 98% of the time.

I would try touching on something with a larger portion of your body (don't do like an electrostatic co-worker of mine does and touch with only your finger tip). I'm not sure how well it will work since it probably is kind of hard to get a large surface area connected at the same time, but I'd be interested to know if helps reducing the sparks in practice.




#17 wrack

wrack

    Wireless Robotic Android Calibrated for Killing

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  • Location: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 06 March 2014 - 00:15

I would try touching on something with a larger portion of your body (don't do like an electrostatic co-worker of mine does and touch with only your finger tip). I'm not sure how well it will work since it probably is kind of hard to get a large surface area connected at the same time, but I'd be interested to know if helps reducing the sparks in practice.

Thanks. I am doing exactly that. Rather than touching a door handle with finger pointing towards, I am making a habit of entire palm making the surface contact.

 

Worst is when I am getting out of the car as the window tint has some form of metal in it and as soon as I step out and touch the door, bamn. Now I keep touching the door frame/window frame/window until I am out of the vehicle and ground myself.

 

Takes time but I am used to them now. Still get odd big sparks once in a month though when I am absent minded!



#18 westom

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 03:01

 I'm thoroughly confused as to why a static shock on my laptop will effect my desktop. I don't notice anything odd on either machine, they're both working without problem.

Any ideas?

 

  Understand what this current is.  You have created charges on both sides of your shoes.  The discharge is a current path that leaves the finger, passes through items (ie laptop) to connect to charges beneath your feet.  Things you consider not conductive (ie floor) actually are conductive.  Just not conductive enough that we call it non-conductive to AC electricity.  But conductive enough for static electricity.

 

  So, how did that current get from your finger tip to beneath your shoes?  One possible path is into the laptop, out via the safety ground wire, over to the other electric socket, into the desktop's chassis, into the floor, and connecting to those charges.

 

  Well, that would not explain the noise.  However some minor variation in that path might.

 

  One known fact is that an electrical connection is made from your finger to charges beneath your shoes.  How it gets there and how it might affect computers is a mystery that only you have sufficient information to answer.

 

  BTW, static electric discharges are a superb diagnostic tool.  As may become obvious with further discussion.



#19 westom

westom

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  • Joined: 02-August 09

Posted 06 March 2014 - 03:16

I have the same problem with my car in winters. I've been shocked so many times now and everytime I say I'll remember next time to discharge before touching the body but I just can't seem to.

  Some tires no longer contain carbon black.  Therefore are much less electrically conductive.  Charges build up between the car's body and earth.  Your body connects those charges causing a static discharge.

 

  Vehicles such as ambulances sometimes have chains hanging from the undercarriage.  When stopped, those chains immediately discharge the vehicle.  Others sometimes used a conductive black strap.  Toll collectors had what looked like an antenna in the toll lane.  These made necessary because some tires are less electrically conductive.

 

  Everything is electrically conductive.  Eventually even tires without carbon black will discharge a car.  Or you touch something much less conductive when exiting.  You are still discharging that car, albeit much slower.  So you do not notice the discharge.





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