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Disable the Windows Store in Windows 8 and Windows 8.1

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#1 Ian W

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 19:31

I have been using Windows 8 for a good while now and found that I have very little use for the Windows Store. While I am a big fan of the new toast notifications for Windows Store applications and even some applications in particular (ABC News for example), it is hard to justify their usage as I do not have a touchscreen - something that would make the experience much more enjoyable.

For these reasons and others, I have decided to disable the Windows Store services and put the resources to better use. You may also wish to do the same, so I have created this little tutorial. Note that while there are already tutorials to do this on the Internet, most of them are not as thorough as this one intends to be. See the Bleeping Computer tutorial or the How-To Geek tutorial for examples of this.

Important! Export the Windows Registry keys that you decide to modify before making changes to the Windows Registry, and create a System Restore point before continuing.

Disable access to the Windows Store via Group Policy or Windows Registry Editor
For all users:
Open the Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) and navigate to Computer Configuration - > Administrative Templates - > Windows Components. Open the Store entry in the right-hand pane, and enable the Turn off the Store application setting.

Alternatively, open Registry Editor (regedit.exe) and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\WindowsStore (if the WindowsStore key does not exist, create it). Create a new DWORD value in the WindowsStore key called RemoveWindowsStore. Set its value to 1.

For current user only:
Open the Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) and navigate to User Configuration - > Administrative Templates - > Windows Components. Open the Store entry in the right-hand pane, and enable the Turn off the Store application setting.

Alternatively, open Registry Editor and navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\WindowsStore. Create a new DWORD value called RemoveWindowsStore. Set its value to 1.

Disable the Windows Store service
Open Registry Editor and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Services\WSService. Select the Start value in the right-hand pane and set its value to 4.

Disable the services associated with the Windows Store and Windows Store applications
This next step is important because, as other users have mentioned, these services are known to consume valuable system resources - a situation made worse if you are no longer able to open the Windows Store (after performing the steps above).

Disable Time Broker
In Registry Editor, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Services\TimeBroker. Select the Start value in the right-hand pane and set its value to 4.

Disable System Events Broker
The task scheduler has a dependency on the system events broker, disabling it is asking for problems - Joe User.

In Registry Editor, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ControlSet001\Services\SystemEventsBroker. Select the Start value in the right-hand pane and set its value to 4.

Unpin the Windows Store tile from the Windows Start screen
If the Windows Store tile is pinned to the Start screen, right click the tile and select the Unpin from Start option that appears in the application bar.


#2 georgevella

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 19:40

This is good if you (and everyone else who ...) believe you need the extra resources.  Personally, I don't see the benefits considering today's hardware.



#3 Joe User

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 19:42

Is it wise to disable the Time Broker and System Events Broker? While you might want to disable the store, I can't see why you would disable applications that register with the brokers.

 

I don't think "saving resources" is a valid reason, they are not resource hogs.

 

Edit: The task scheduler has a dependency on the system events broker, disabling it is asking for problems.


Edited by Joe User, 16 March 2014 - 19:50.


#4 chrisj1968

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 19:59

I think this isn't so much important about resources but the ability to shut something down one doesn't want.



#5 The_Observer

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 19:59

Resources would be very low to nothing imho. BUT for work this would be great. Thanks



#6 Joe User

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 20:05

I think this isn't so much important about resources but the ability to shut something down one doesn't want.

 

I can't think of a situation where anyone would want to disrupt the task scheduler.



#7 OP Ian W

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 20:42

This is good if you (and everyone else who ...) believe you need the extra resources.  Personally, I don't see the benefits considering today's hardware.

Is it wise to disable the Time Broker and System Events Broker? While you might want to disable the store, I can't see why you would disable applications that register with the brokers.

 

I don't think "saving resources" is a valid reason, they are not resource hogs.

 

Edit: The task scheduler has a dependency on the system events broker, disabling it is asking for problems.

The whole idea of this tutorial is that if a user does not use the Windows Store or Windows Store applications, they can be completely disabled. If a user still wishes to use Windows Store applications, he or she should not disable the Windows Store, Time Broker or System Events Broker services (something that I thought would be obvious due to the description of these services in Windows 8).

I mentioned resource usage only because several users have reported that Time Broker and System Events Broker spike the CPU or use large amounts of memory. Granted, this only happens if one uses the Windows Store or its applications, but if a user does not use the new Windows 8 application infrastructure, why leave these services running at all?

With that said, thank you very much for alerting me (and the readers of this topic) to the potential dangers of disabling System Events Broker. Would a moderator include this information in the original post, and give credit to Joe User for this?



#8 zhangm

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 22:28

With that said, thank you very much for alerting me (and the readers of this topic) to the potential dangers of disabling System Events Broker. Would a moderator include this information in the original post, and give credit to Joe User for this?

 

Modified as requested.



#9 Joe User

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Posted 16 March 2014 - 23:51

After testing, I would like to let you know that disabling the System Events Broker will disable the Task Scheduler completely.

 

DO NOT DO THIS!

 

There are hundreds of applications that rely on the Task Scheduler in Windows 8.

 

If you want to remove the dependency, you can hack the registry to do it, but seriously, this is reckless advice. The average user who thinks they are optimizing their system is going to wind up with a broken Windows update, a broken Windows Media center, optimization and cleanup tasks not being run, and in the long term an unstable system.



#10 +timster

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 00:02

I prefer the much simpler method of just not opening the Store application. It's not as if it takes a large amount of space on the hard drive or bogs down any resources



#11 Anibal P

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 00:33

Seems like a huge waste of time for something easily ignored, hell you can even REMOVE THE ICON for the store and never see it



#12 Raa

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 00:40

Or if you're like me and don't use the Store, you simply don't use it - or Windows 8.x



#13 +Brandon Live

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 00:46

Ugh, do not do any of this unless you really want to hork up your system.

 

I have been using Windows 8 for a good while now and found that I have very little use for the Windows Store. While I am a big fan of the new toast notifications for Windows Store applications and even some applications in particular (ABC News for example), it is hard to justify their usage as I do not have a touchscreen - something that would make the experience much more enjoyable.

 

What does having a touchscreen have to do with the Store?



#14 +LogicalApex

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 01:13

Ugh, do not do any of this unless you really want to hork up your system.


What does having a touchscreen have to do with the Store?


Using group policy to disable the store will hurt the system? If so, why is this option included in the OS?

#15 Joe User

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 01:15

Using group policy to disable the store will hurt the system? If so, why is this option included in the OS?

 

I think he was referring to the second part.