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Poll: WP Update 8.1: Features/Apps/Fixes You Want The Most! (WP 8.1 MegaThread)

Do You Want Start Screen Backgrounds?

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#16 George P

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 23:07

It boils down to costs... The more platforms you have to target the more developers you have to hire and developers cost a fair bit of money.

 

Most apps are done by one or a few people at best, we're not talking something huge here like a big name AAA video game for example.  Sure mobile games probably have more people but lots of times we're talking simple, yet official, apps.    Add to the fact MS makes it easy and cheap to code for WP, and also target Windows in the process.   I really question what the costs could be.




#17 +LogicalApex

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 23:11

Most apps are done by one or a few people at best, we're not talking something huge here like a big name AAA video game for example.  Sure mobile games probably have more people but lots of times we're talking simple, yet official, apps.    Add to the fact MS makes it easy and cheap to code for WP, and also target Windows in the process.   I really question what the costs could be.

Well... The average mobile developer (at least here) makes around $120K/y... You still need to factor in auxiliary benefits (healthcare, vacation time, etc.) and lets say you're easily looking at $150K/y per developer... A "simple" "2 developer" application and you're looking at ~$300K/y in expenses... That doesn't count hiring designers to give it a clean UI or marketing people to ensure it is branded well...



#18 George P

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 23:23

Well... The average mobile developer (at least here) makes around $120K/y... You still need to factor in auxiliary benefits (healthcare, vacation time, etc.) and lets say you're easily looking at $150K/y per developer... A "simple" "2 developer" application and you're looking at ~$300K/y in expenses... That doesn't count hiring designers to give it a clean UI or marketing people to ensure it is branded well...

 

That's if you need to hire new people,  at the least you can use the same UI like they tend to do between the iOS and Android versions already.   I think in most cases the same people who made those versions can port it over to WP.



#19 +LogicalApex

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 23:38

That's if you need to hire new people,  at the least you can use the same UI like they tend to do between the iOS and Android versions already.   I think in most cases the same people who made those versions can port it over to WP.

Possibly, but keep in mind that iOS developers are using Objective-C on MacOS and Android developers may also be using MacOS as their development environment with Java as the language of choice. To target Windows Phone these users will need to use C# and Windows...

 

It is much easier to get a WP developer to support iOS and Android by using one of the many C# to iOS,Android development options.

 

Android developers could target WP a lot easier as they could, in theory, be using Windows as their environment. C# and Java are almost more similar than they aren't. But the hate Java developers have for C# wouldn't help at all...

 

The company I work for now decided to migrate a bunch of their development work from Java to C# and as a result they lost more than half their programmers (and we're not a small company... We have over 15K employees and a very large developer staff).



#20 elenarie

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 00:10

The company I work for now decided to migrate a bunch of their development work from Java to C# and as a result they lost more than half their programmers (and we're not a small company... We have over 15K employees and a very large developer staff).

 

That is bad. :( Wouldn't it have been possible to give those devs a bit time to adjust to C# and be equally, if not more productive? Or did they left because they didn't want to work with C#?



#21 +LogicalApex

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 00:20

That is bad. :( Wouldn't it have been possible to give those devs a bit time to adjust to C# and be equally, if not more productive? Or did they left because they didn't want to work with C#?

The company didn't fire the developers. The developers left because they didn't want to work with C#. Java developers seem to really hate C#...



#22 MorganX

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 12:11

The company didn't fire the developers. The developers left because they didn't want to work with C#. Java developers seem to really hate C#...

 

Right now good devs are in such demand they don't have to stay in a place they don't want to be.



#23 George P

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 16:54

Though I'm no expert I think C# shares much of it's syntax with Java, I don't know why Java developers would hate it, unless those are just the ones you know of.   Regardless, growing WP market and a maturing OS will bring in the developers, specially when MS makes it as painless as they can.



#24 +LogicalApex

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 17:11

Though I'm no expert I think C# shares much of it's syntax with Java, I don't know why Java developers would hate it, unless those are just the ones you know of.   Regardless, growing WP market and a maturing OS will bring in the developers, specially when MS makes it as painless as they can.

It has a lot to do with the history of C#... C# was created as a rip off of Java in response to Sun suing MS for including its own non-standard Java VM in Windows. There is also the hate for Visual Studio and other issues...

 

C# has now matured into something on its own, but the historical tension between Java and C# still plays strongly.

 

The problem for Microsoft really is that they have lost developers in a deep way. There are legions of C# developers supporting enterprise applications who seem to be completely uninterested in working with MS technologies in mobile. I remember when I did Windows Phone development in the WP7.x days and even going to c# focused events netted me questions of why when I mentioned developing for the platform. Of course, the new developers focused primarily on mobile don't even consider C#/.NET when they start.

 

In my case, MS lost me completely with the WP7-WP8 split. I know, no one cares so I won't delve into that.

 

I think the core problem MS has is they have to convince the developer community that MS matters. This problem is deeper than their raw user numbers... It is also very complicated as you won't get satisfied users without the developers supporting the platform.



#25 SierraSonic

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 17:23

- Remove the hard limit on downloads that forces you to use wifi.

- Remove the hard limit on background apps that limits the amount of apps. Enable user limits with a battery drain message (such as the volume warning message which still lets you "destroy your ears")

- Remove the hard limit on background apps that limits how often background apps can update data and "live" tiles. Enable user limits with a battery drain message (such as the volume warning message which still lets you "destroy your ears")

- Remove the hard limits.... period, make everything an option. Enable user limits with a warning message (such as the volume warning message which still lets you "destroy your ears")

- Bing search ala Windows 8.1.

- Enable the ability to set more default apps, such as one for music, video players, photo apps, and navigation apps, more like you can choose what the default camera is.* Allow flashlight to be set as camera button with 5 second hold as an option.

- Option to not sync for set amount of minutes after turning the screen off, tired of getting a new notification after I manage to finally put my phone down.

 

 

Pretty much I'm asking to remove artifical limits, and allow more options, make the experience truly live if I want it, or make it as battery conservative as possible. These limits made sense during the windows phone 7 saga, they are just in the way now.

 

What is the point of having datasense if you wont let me use my data the way I have it setup anyway "Unlimited should mean unlimited, not limited to wifi."



#26 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 02 April 2014 - 13:31

It boils down to costs... The more platforms you have to target the more developers you have to hire and developers cost a fair bit of money.

Exactly. That's why iOS tends to get priority, as there are far fewer handsets and a large number of users. Android usually follows because of the huge number of handsets out there and the wide variety of OS versions. More people use Android but it's harder to support. WP is simply a low priority because of its market share.

 

I remember when I first bought an Android phone it had relatively poor software support, as the iPhone dominated the market - now it's incredibly strong. Unfortunately WP's market share isn't growing at anywhere close to the rate that Android did, so the situation remains decidedly more mixed. It's not seen as an up and coming platform, it's seen as a niche player.



#27 vbeekjan

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 09:20

Let's be honest, the design setup of WP is good and clear. BUT ... it is also clear that it is never finished. So many bugs still there and never solved. The Calendar is a mess and messes up all your appointments when you change to another timezone. It even spreads your events to two days ! And the option "list todo items in calender" does not work at all. The music player once started cannot be stopped, only paused, and will show up everytime you unlock the phone. PDF attachments and docs cannot be save to your phone only to Skydrive, and there is no way to copy them to your phone. The phone cannot be switched off during charging giving NSA and Microsoft ample time to investigate where you are and have done, and how they got a green label for this behaviour is a mystery for me. I shall not go on too long this way. But the worst thing is there is no support available to report these things which could easily be fixed with updates, like on my computer. So these annoying bugs will be forever on WP's and never solved. So I wonder if these kind of bugs which prevent professional usage will be solved in W8.1 and if Microsoft will treat their customers more serious by providing a kind of support. Now I am fed up with this device with all kind of nice gadgets but with a rusty not-finished OS which is more a downgrade from my reliable Symbian phone than an upgrade in many subjects. OK a long introduction to say: my Lumia920 is for sale.



#28 TPreston

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 14:02

  1. SSTP VPN
  2. SSTP VPN
  3. SSTP VPN
  4. SSTP VPN!
  5. Go back in time and add SSTP VPN support to WP7.5 because it should have been there from the start!