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win8.1

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#1 xWhiplash

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 12:15

Am I assuming that the Windows 8.1 Full Version is the same thing we were used to with Windows 7 for example?

 

I am referring to this:  http://www.newegg.co...N82E16832416711

 

So there is no more personal use license?  

 

If this is the case, then it is about time.  Microsoft made it so confusing what version to get.  




#2 firey

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 12:16

I think the difference might be full vs. upgrade.   Upgrade requires that you have windows already installed. Full means you could do it from a clean slate.



#3 Gotenks98

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 12:18

There was nothing confusing about it in the past, it just means you are paying more for something that you shouldn't. The upgrade version works just fine. If your computer didn't come with an initial windows license then buying a generic oem version was the better approach to that from a legal standpoint but again like I said before the upgrade version works just fine.


I think the difference might be full vs. upgrade.   Upgrade requires that you have windows already installed. Full means you could do it from a clean slate.

You can do a clean install with an upgrade, you either have to do a double install or the registry trick, both of which are supported by Microsoft.



#4 firey

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 12:21

You can do a clean install with an upgrade, you either have to do a double install or the registry trick, both of which are supported by Microsoft.

 

I know there are the tricks for doing it.. but usually it's classified as separate (upgrade vs full)



#5 Polarman

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 12:55

In my case, I prefer using a "retail" version. I can change my whole PC without fear of having activation issues. I can even get a replacement disk if my copy gets damaged. 



#6 OP xWhiplash

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 15:19

In my case, I prefer using a "retail" version. I can change my whole PC without fear of having activation issues. I can even get a replacement disk if my copy gets damaged. 

 

Agreed, that is what was so confusing about the Windows 8 licensing.  What if I wanted to upgrade parts of my computer with the Windows 8 Personal License?

 

So this Windows 8.1 Full Version is just like what we remember with Windows 7?

 

And in terms of a legal standpoint, isn't the OEM license ONLY supposed to be used for computers that you create for other people.  Dell for example?  This is what was so confusing about Windows 8 OEM / Personal Use license.  If I get the personal use license, can I use it for business related tasks?  



#7 Gotenks98

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 15:36

In my case, I prefer using a "retail" version. I can change my whole PC without fear of having activation issues. I can even get a replacement disk if my copy gets damaged. 

I don't see the issues. How hard is it to make a 3 to 5 minute phone call to get reactivated? I have never seen where the phone activation failed for that. You are just paying more for something when you don't have to. You would easily have to reactivate with an upgrade as you would for full/retail product key.


Agreed, that is what was so confusing about the Windows 8 licensing.  What if I wanted to upgrade parts of my computer with the Windows 8 Personal License?

 

So this Windows 8.1 Full Version is just like what we remember with Windows 7?

 

And in terms of a legal standpoint, isn't the OEM license ONLY supposed to be used for computers that you create for other people.  Dell for example?  This is what was so confusing about Windows 8 OEM / Personal Use license.  If I get the personal use license, can I use it for business related tasks?  

You can change parts as needed. The only thing that I have seen that matters is if you change the motherboard and even then you can still call them and they will still reactivate you. Seriously people don't spend more money than you have to on this. Its not as hard as you are making this out to be.



#8 shozilla

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 15:36

There was nothing confusing about it in the past, it just means you are paying more for something that you shouldn't. The upgrade version works just fine. If your computer didn't come with an initial windows license then buying a generic oem version was the better approach to that from a legal standpoint but again like I said before the upgrade version works just fine.


You can do a clean install with an upgrade, you either have to do a double install or the registry trick, both of which are supported by Microsoft.

 

You can do the clean install from the upgrade DVD but you can insert previous version of Windows DVD in and the system will take system files from DVD and place in HDD/SSD and then you can finish the Windows installation ... you don't have to install old Windows and then install new one in which takes too much time.  

 

I have done many installations in my time for friends/family for many years.



#9 OP xWhiplash

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 15:47

I don't see the issues. How hard is it to make a 3 to 5 minute phone call to get reactivated? I have never seen where the phone activation failed for that. You are just paying more for something when you don't have to. You would easily have to reactivate with an upgrade as you would for full/retail product key.


You can change parts as needed. The only thing that I have seen that matters is if you change the motherboard and even then you can still call them and they will still reactivate you. Seriously people don't spend more money than you have to on this. Its not as hard as you are making this out to be.

 

It is still not correct regarding the EULA.  The upgrade edition is just that an upgrade.  Can it be done?  Yes.  I am "by the books" kind of guy.  I get the correct version.  If I get a Apple laptop, I should NOT get an upgrade edition because that has never had a Windows license on there.  And what was confusing about the OEM / Personal License is, was it okay to use for business use?  What if my laptop died and I had to get it replaced?  Sure I can call, but still the EULA states one thing.



#10 Gotenks98

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 15:49

You can do the clean install from the upgrade DVD but you can insert previous version of Windows DVD in and the system will take system files from DVD and place in HDD/SSD and then you can finish the Windows installation ... you don't have to install old Windows and then install new one in which takes too much time.  

 

I have done many installations in my time for friends/family for many years.

Thats incorrect, this hasn't been true since Windows XP, starting with vista this has changed. In order for the install to count as an upgrade a windows installation has to be on the hard drive. Thats if your booting from the disc. The installer does not check for previous OS media.


It is still not correct regarding the EULA.  The upgrade edition is just that an upgrade.  Can it be done?  Yes.  I am "by the books" kind of guy.  I get the correct version.  If I get a Apple laptop, I should NOT get an upgrade edition because that has never had a Windows license on there.  And what was confusing about the OEM / Personal License is, was it okay to use for business use?  What if my laptop died and I had to get it replaced?  Sure I can call, but still the EULA states one thing.

If your laptop dies then you either buy a new license or use the recovery media from the manufacturer. Those are your real options. Technically speaking if it died with windows 7 and you wanted to go to Windows 8.1 you could do it as an upgrade.



#11 Gotenks98

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 15:54

Let me make this more clear, in order to comply with the EULA when using upgrade, some version of windows has to already be there meaning you have a license for it. You could do Win 7 home premium and upgrade to Win 7 Pro/Ultimate/Win8.0 Core/Win 8.0 Pro/8.1 Core/Pro versions.



#12 OP xWhiplash

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 15:58

But the question on my first post was:  Is this new Windows 8.1 Full Version the same as a Windows 7 Retail version that we are used to?  The link to the product is in the first post.

 

As in:  Will that Windows 8.1 Full Version allow me (in terms of following the EULA to the letter) to get an Apple Laptop and use Windows 8.1 for business use?



#13 shozilla

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 16:01

Thats incorrect, this hasn't been true since Windows XP, starting with vista this has changed. In order for the install to count as an upgrade a windows installation has to be on the hard drive. Thats if your booting from the disc. The installer does not check for previous OS media.

 

 

Hahaha... No!  It is correct! Trust me.   I have done this for many years.. 

 

It works fine since the day one I installed this way and even friends and family have no problems since I fixed for them.



#14 Gotenks98

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 16:02

Yes what you want to do is fine. I have even seen some Eulas where Microsoft considers an upgrade with going from Mac OSX. I remember seeing this on Dreamspark at one time.



#15 LaP

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 16:05

I think the difference might be full vs. upgrade.   Upgrade requires that you have windows already installed. Full means you could do it from a clean slate.

 

You can do a clean install with an upgrade copy. I think you just need to have a previous version of Windows activated on the same machine to be able to activate the upgrade without calling MS.

 

Anyway i always did clean install with my upgrade copy and never had problem activating them.





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