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#1 compl3x

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 01:19

Turning clocks forward an hour for daylight saving time in the United States is followed by a spike in heart attacks on the Monday afterward, according to a study.
 
But when clocks fall back and people gain an hour of sleep, there is a drop in heart attacks on the Tuesday, said the research, presented at the American College of Cardiology conference.
 
The findings showed no change in the total number of heart attacks during the entire week following any clock change, indicating the spike seen on Monday is levelled out in the days that follow.
 
But knowing that a surge in patients can be expected in the emergency room could help doctors better prepare, said lead author Amneet Sandhu, cardiology fellow at the University of Colorado in Denver.
 
 
 
"It may be that we, as people, are very sensitive to the loss of even one hour's sleep," Dr Sandhu told reporters.
 
"It may mean that people who are already vulnerable to heart disease may be at greater risk right after sudden time changes."
 
The study was based on a database of hospitals in Michigan.
 
There was a 25 per cent jump in the number of heart attacks occurring the Monday after the spring time change - or a total of eight additional heart attacks - and a 21 per cent drop the Tuesday after the fall return to standard time.
 
 
Monday is traditionally the day when most heart attacks occur, previous research has found.
 
But by looking at hospital data over four consecutive years, researchers saw a consistent 34 per cent increase in heart attacks from one week to the next at the spring time change.
 
There were an average of 93 heart attacks the Monday before compared to 125 the week after the start of daylight saving time across those four years.
 
Daylight saving time in the US - implemented to save energy during World War I - is controversial and some believe it is not needed anymore.
 
Dr Sandhu said future research should compare the Michigan findings to heart attack trends in Hawaii and Arizona, which do not have daylight saving time.
 
 
 



#2 nvllsvm

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 01:26

Even time is not free from government intervention...



#3 DocM

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 01:33

Don't mess with biological clocks. They evolved without DST and don't like its imposition.

#4 +DConnell

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 01:56

And the point behind the stupid clock trick is?



#5 Torolol

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 02:03

DST creates more trouble that offset the benefit that whatever 'saving' it suppose to do.



#6 +_Alexander

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 02:03

And the point behind the stupid clock trick is?

Killing people from heart attacks and lack of sleep apparently.

#7 ensiform

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 02:21

Daylights waste of time, should just be always on or always off.  It serves no real purpose other than lighter out later in the time that it is on, thus more people shop later.  The energy savings is not really a valid argument in this day and age.



#8 LaP

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 02:24

Why do old people have more sex the day following the start of daylight saving time?



#9 AsherGZ

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 03:22

Murrica!

 

If I had to guess, I'd say it was because they spent the previous day gorging on pancakes, bacon and other high calorie foods and then flipping channels from the couch all day long.



#10 DocM

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 03:55

Murrica!

If I had to guess, I'd say it was because they spent the previous day gorging on pancakes, bacon and other high calorie foods and then flipping channels from the couch all day long.


FYI - DST is not just a US practice, and its purpose varies, so your "Murica!" comment begs for some some education,

Wiki article: https://en.m.wikiped...ght_saving_time

Blue: DST used
Orange: DST no longer used
Red: DST never used

DaylightSaving-World-Subdivisions.png

#11 AsherGZ

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 07:54

FYI - DST is not just a US practice, and its purpose varies, so your "Murica!" comment begs for some some education,

Wiki article: https://en.m.wikiped...ght_saving_time

Blue: DST used
Orange: DST no longer used
Red: DST never used
 

Oh I know DST is not US specific, we observe it here too, but high obesity rate among children and heart attacks on Monday after losing an hour of sleep just might be. ;)



#12 Colicab

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 08:13

Daylights waste of time, should just be always on or always off.  It serves no real purpose other than lighter out later in the time that it is on, thus more people shop later.  The energy savings is not really a valid argument in this day and age.

How is saving energy no longer important?

Aren`t we all moving towards greener lives?

Maybe I dreamt all that stuff about the environment and ozone layer, not as if the polar ice caps are melting or that....



#13 Redmak

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 08:30

Are we really that fragile? One hour sleep (more or less) can be a matter of life and death? I never sleep the same amount of hours.

Move the clock an hour forward when you wake up, if your body is not capable of handling one hour less sleep.



#14 DocM

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 09:03

Are we really that fragile? One hour sleep (more or less) can be a matter of life and death?....

Yes, our internal rythms can be that "fragile." Ever travel and get desynchronosis (jet lag)? It's a similar stressor that over time can cause an increased risk of cancer, infertility, and heart disease. So says the NIH. Now add any cardiac risk facorrs you may have and....

The bottom line is that regular sleep patterns can be very important. Ignore at your own risk.

#15 blerk

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 09:38

It's probably the stress of having to ask everyone whether the clocks go forwards or backwards. 

 

 

(Relevant link :D)