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Help me pick a Studio Monitor setup?

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#16 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 22:08

or, you know, not everybody knows that studio monitors are not, in fact, monitors in the common usage of that word. I'm surprised only one person made that mistake.

He listed the speakers he was currently using, so there really was no confusion.




#17 Andre S.

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 23:20

That's completely wrong. Studio monitors are inherently better than hi-fi speakers because they have an accurate frequency range - they are able to accurately reproduce all frequencies and don't have to exaggerate the bass, which is something consumer hi-fi speakers usually do to mask their shortcomings. .

Note that I didn't say which are better; they just serve different purposes. Studio monitors are also usually near-field which means they're not designed to fill a room, say, in a home theater setup; they're designed to be on your desk pointed at your ears.

 

Studio monitors make great recordings truly shine, but they also let bad recordings sound as bad as they are, so they're not necessarily ideal, especially for the price, for someone looking for a consistently pleasant listening experience using mediocre sources - i.e. youtube, video games, etc.

 

I personally own studio monitors and wouldn't use anything else - but that's personal preference, and I fully understand not everyone wants to pay several hundreds for something that'll make their bad mp3s sound as terrible as they truly are.



#18 primexx

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 00:04

He listed the speakers he was currently using, so there really was no confusion.

 

You expect someone who doesn't know what studio monitors are to recognize what a model number refers to? The only obvious sign is the mention of Logitech, that's hardly an unmistakable indicator for someone who's skimming (and especially since companies branch out into new markets all the time).



#19 +Boo Berry

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 00:09

I'm thinking what I said might be best in this case, if you can go to an electronics (or speciality) store like Best Buy and see if they have any displays setup where you can try different speakers and find a pair within your price range and liking.



#20 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 01:02

You expect someone who doesn't know what studio monitors are to recognize what a model number refers to? The only obvious sign is the mention of Logitech, that's hardly an unmistakable indicator for someone who's skimming (and especially since companies branch out into new markets all the time).

Logitech don't make display monitors and he clearly stated he was looking for a better audio interface to power them. If you choose not to read the post then you can't complain when you misinterpret things.

 

Note that I didn't say which are better; they just serve different purposes. Studio monitors are also usually near-field which means they're not designed to fill a room, say, in a home theater setup; they're designed to be on your desk pointed at your ears.

 

Studio monitors make great recordings truly shine, but they also let bad recordings sound as bad as they are, so they're not necessarily ideal, especially for the price, for someone looking for a consistently pleasant listening experience using mediocre sources - i.e. youtube, video games, etc.

Actually, that's exactly what you said:

Hi-fi speakers sound good. Studio monitors don't.

You're just saying the same thing, which is that home theatre setups sound better. All those sources you listed sound better on studio monitors. Home theatre setups and computer speakers hugely exaggerate the bass and produce muddy mids, which serves to cover up their weaker frequency reproduction but don't improve the sound quality. It's like saying that dirty windows are better as that way people outside can't see how messy your room is - that doesn't make your room any less messy, it just obscures it with another problem. The reason that studio monitors aren't so common is not that their sound quality is too good that they makes things sound bad but because the enclosures needed to produce decent sound quality aren't convenient for most homes and that they're more expensive.

 

I just don't agree with your statement, especially given what the OP asked for. They already have a home theatre setup and are looking for something that offers better sound quality - they specified studio monitors. Having a studio monitor setup myself, and having used numerous home theatre setups (I currently have a Panasonic SC-BT230 setup for the front room), I can say confidently that even for lower quality sound sources studio monitors sound better. Of course you can notice when the sound quality isn't as good because that's an inherent feature of having better sound quality.



#21 Andre S.

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:09

Actually, that's exactly what you said:
 

Hi-fi speakers sound good. Studio monitors don't.

You're just saying the same thing, which is that home theatre setups sound better. 

Yes, better as in more consistently "pleasant" regardless of the source, and better as in more fit to replace a Z-5500 for the purpose of filling a living room with sound. Not better as in more transparent or higher quality. You don't want near-field monitors at the other end of the room.

 

I read the OP's needs as:

 - Not much money to spend

 - Speakers should "outperform" the Z-5500, i.e. move at least as much air

 - Will be used for home theater purposes

 - Do not need to be audiophile grade

 - Should just be stereo speakers so there's less encumbrance

 - OP has no experience with studio monitors

 

From that I conclude that when the OP says "studio monitors" he's just referring to the form factor, i.e. bookshelf speakers. Hence I don't think studio monitors are what he's really looking for. In other words, something like this rather than something like this.



#22 OP Scraggles

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:21

I guess what I am looking for is some bookshelf speakers. I saw some nice Bose speakers but I'd need an amp. Not exactly something I'd want taking up space on my desk. Are there small amps?

#23 Andre S.

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:26

I guess what I am looking for is some bookshelf speakers. I saw some nice Bose speakers but I'd need an amp. Not exactly something I'd want taking up space on my desk. Are there small amps?

By the way, am I right when I say you're using this for home theater purposes, or I'm making myself look stupid?

 

If you're gonna put those speakers on your desk right in front of your face, then near-field monitors are actually worth looking into. Check out that video I originally posted for some good suggestions at various price ranges. They're all powered so no need for amps.

 

Whatever you do, DON'T GO BOSE. Often referred to in audiophile circles as Buy Other Sound Equipment... 'nuff said :p



#24 OP Scraggles

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:30

By the way, am I right when I say you're using this for home theater purposes, or I'm making myself look stupid?

If you're gonna put those speakers on your desk right in front of your face, then near-field monitors are actually worth looking into. Check out that video I originally posted for some good suggestions at various price ranges. They're all powered so no need for amps.

Whatever you do, DON'T GO BOSE. Often referred to in audiophile circles as Buy Other Sound Equipment... 'nuff said :p

you're correct. I plan on using them for my PC needs. Music, movies, and games.

#25 Andre S.

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:31

you're correct. I plan on using them for my PC needs. Music, movies, and games.

Ok so they're sitting on your desk right in front of you. So definitely check out powered near-field monitors.



#26 OP Scraggles

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:33

Ok so they're sitting on your desk right in front of you. So definitely check out powered near-field monitors.

do you have suggestions that could keep me around the 500$ price range?

#27 Andre S.

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:41

do you have suggestions that could keep me around the 500$ price range?

For exactly 500$ you could get a pair of Behringer Truth B3031A on amazon with a superbly flat frequency response and ribbon tweeters no less. Or Rokit 8s which I had the pleasure to work with, incredibly accurate speakers as well. Or Mackie MR8s. There are many other good options. In that price range definitely look for an 8" woofer as it'll give you that extra bass extension you'll be otherwise missing without a sub.

 

Keep in mind you'll likely need to spend a bit more for an external DAC and electrical isolation. 



#28 notuptome2004

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:55

just get a pair of these  

 

 

http://www.klipsch.c...mputer-speakers