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Can't ping but cross-over cable is fine


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Posted

Hey guys,

 

 

New printer (Xerox 560 printer). Printed fine since last week's install. 

Then this morning, Nada.

 

I saw that the green light on the nic was off. So I tried changing the NIC from Auto to full duplex and the light came back on, but no one could print. Nada.

 

We still have the old printer. So I disconnected the new printer, and used the network cable for the old printer which promptly resumed printing at our requests.

 

Our new printer has its own web server (CentreWare) and so I connected to the printer using the cross-over cable and sure enough I could print and connect to its webpage etc. 

 

...

 

 

I reconnected it to the network.

 

Then I tried to ping the printer from different machines. Nada.

(All on the same subnet, printer has the same IP as ever, and there's no security in the printer to prevent ping).

 

I tried turning off all security in the router. Nada.

 

Tried changing the i.p. address to a different one. Nada.

 

 

I need a Ninja. :shiftyninja:

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Posted

No, you need a bud...man that is! Get in touch with budman. He is the best!

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Posted

If it's connected to a router, switch, hub, or other networking device and not directly to another printer or computer, then it should be using a straight-through cable.  Most NICs auto-detect nowadays, but crossover cables are generally intended for directly connecting to like devices.  I.E. Switch to switch, router to router, computer to computer, etc (Think XBox link cable for the original XBox).  If there's anything between those devices, such as your computer and printer connecting to a switch or router, then you should just be using standard straight-through cables.

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Posted

So what lights are you getting, I would not hard code unless you can hard code on the switch as well for speed and duplex.

 

So is the printer hard coded IP or dhcp?  So your hard coded, and you have lights?  And can not ping unless you directly connect with crossover cable?

 

If you have lights, from your machine try to ping the IP.. If doesn't work, check the arp table real quick.  Do you get mac of the printer interface?  I would suggest switch back to auto.. And what exact printer and switch/router are we talking about where the printer ethernet cable is connected too - are you using straight or crossover?

 

post-14624-0-31080600-1398745525.png

 

Does your printer have way to print out network status?  What does it say?

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Posted

So what lights are you getting, I would not hard code unless you can hard code on the switch as well for speed and duplex.

Green light on the nic instead of none once I switched from 'Auto' to 'Full Duplex 100'.

 

So is the printer hard coded IP or dhcp? 

Static IP from the beginning. 

 

So your hard coded, and you have lights? 

I changed the speec of the nic  using the UI of the printer from 'Auto' to 'Full Duplex 100"

 

And can not ping unless you directly connect with crossover cable?

With cross over cable everything works, print driver, ping of course, etc.

 

If you have lights, from your machine try to ping the IP.. If doesn't work, check the arp table real quick.  Do you get mac of the printer interface?  I would suggest switch back to auto.. And what exact printer and switch/router are we talking about where the printer ethernet cable is connected too - are you using straight or crossover?

 

attachicon.gifarp.png

 

Does your printer have way to print out network status?  What does it say?

 

I will let you know you once I go back to the office. Thank you so much for your help. :)

If it's connected to a router, switch, hub, or other networking device and not directly to another printer or computer, then it should be using a straight-through cable.  Most NICs auto-detect nowadays, but crossover cables are generally intended for directly connecting to like devices.  I.E. Switch to switch, router to router, computer to computer, etc (Think XBox link cable for the original XBox).  If there's anything between those devices, such as your computer and printer connecting to a switch or router, then you should just be using standard straight-through cables.

 

Thank you for the information. Yes, we're using normal cables, but to connect directly to the printer, I had a cross over lying next to me so I took it.

No, you need a bud...man that is! Get in touch with budman. He is the best!

I wonder who would have the upper hand between a Jedi and Superwoman.

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Posted

Network cable was dead it turns out! Thank you all for your kind suggestions :)

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