Jump to content



Photo
hot swap cold swap raid

  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

Poll: RAID array disk management

Would you swap a new disk from a RAID array...

You cannot see the results of the poll until you have voted. Please login and cast your vote to see the results of this poll.
Vote Guests cannot vote

#16 OP Praetor

Praetor

    ASCii / ANSi Designer

  • Tech Issues Solved: 7
  • Joined: 05-June 02
  • Location: Lisbon
  • OS: Windows Eight dot One dot One 1!one

Posted 07 May 2014 - 16:50

You have been given the best advice out there.. What more do you want?

 

lol i just wanted to know what you guys prefer and why; i already do know what i prefer and use, just wanted to know if more people go for the hot swap or prefer (and why) the cold swap of dead disks.




#17 Hurmoth

Hurmoth

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 09-March 03
  • Location: Virginia

Posted 07 May 2014 - 16:54

Delete the entire array and restore the backup to a new RAID 6 Array. Don't use RAID5 anymore. Don't use RAID6 anymore, err, in 2019.

 

http://www.zdnet.com...ing-in-2009/162

http://www.zdnet.com...ing-in-2019/805

Fixed.

 

:laugh:

 

Sorry, I had to add that. I have very little knowledge when it comes to this sort of stuff, so I looked up RAID6 to read up on it and that was the first article to appear.

 

Anyway, thanks for the link.



#18 REM2000

REM2000

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 20-July 04
  • Location: UK

Posted 07 May 2014 - 16:58

please don't take this a rude however with a RAID either 5/6/10 or million in a degraded state if this is in a mission critical/production environment i wouldn't have time to ask a forum i would be either performing a hot swap or a cold swap, if another drive goes pop you are looking at downtime whilst restoring it, obviously you can have a drive go pop during a RAID 5 rebuild which is why generally RAID 6 is a good idea, i tend to use RAID 5 where the storage is kind of disposable. 

 

for your question i would go for hot swap as the service/data will still be available to end users and a rebuild takes ages so there is no telling how long it would be to rebuild your server during a cold swap, leaving you without a server / service for a day. Obviously the bigger the drives the longer the rebuild (and your servers RAID controller and HDD speed/perf). 



#19 daorbed9

daorbed9

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 10-May 13
  • Location: NC

Posted 07 May 2014 - 17:09

If you can hotswap then hotswap. That is why we have such a feature.

 

This is correct.  If the feature is disabled or you can't then it doesn't matter.  If you can then you should.  It's not going to risk hurting anything.  You might want to warn the users the performance will be abysmal while its rebuilding.



#20 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

    Electrical & Computer Engineer

  • Tech Issues Solved: 29
  • Joined: 23-August 05
  • OS: Win/Lin/Bsd/Osx
  • Phone: dumb phone

Posted 07 May 2014 - 21:49

yes this is kind of response i'm looking for: simple, concise and direct to the point.

 

More?

I think sc302's answer is pretty much the best reason. The reason against doing it would be if there was some physical issue with putting the new drive in where you suspected it could get shock or static or something like that. Why that would be the case? I don't think it would in any real world scenario unless you were replacing the drive next to cats walking on your server and rubbing on you :rofl:



#21 +Bryan R.

Bryan R.

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 04-September 07
  • Location: Palm Beach, FL

Posted 07 May 2014 - 22:18

If specific factors such as the existence of a backplane and down time are outside the scope of the poll, then factors such as environmental differences and physical abnormalities in a chassis should also be equally uninteresting.

 

As for my professional opinion, hot swap is the default. No reason why not.



#22 OP Praetor

Praetor

    ASCii / ANSi Designer

  • Tech Issues Solved: 7
  • Joined: 05-June 02
  • Location: Lisbon
  • OS: Windows Eight dot One dot One 1!one

Posted 08 May 2014 - 01:25

please don't take this a rude however with a RAID either 5/6/10 or million in a degraded state if this is in a mission critical/production environment i wouldn't have time to ask a forum i would be either performing a hot swap or a cold swap, if another drive goes pop you are looking at downtime whilst restoring it, obviously you can have a drive go pop during a RAID 5 rebuild which is why generally RAID 6 is a good idea, i tend to use RAID 5 where the storage is kind of disposable.

 

fortunately neither would i; this is just a single, honest question i wanted to ask because I've talked with fellow ITs about this and while some prefer hot swap (and i have my own preference, i just didn't disclosure so i could not affect the poll result) others prefer cold swap but none of them gave me a logical, proved reason for that, just this "gut feeling" or "past experiences" non sense that lacks real evidence.

 

thanks for the inputs guys; myself i ALWAYS hot swap disks (if supported), it's a great feature and only once I've deal with a server reboot while i was swapping a drive; it turn out that the array controller was going to die soon.

 

So, from what i see, the majority prefers hot swap and gave me some logical explanations, but for the very few that chose cold swap: why?



#23 OP Praetor

Praetor

    ASCii / ANSi Designer

  • Tech Issues Solved: 7
  • Joined: 05-June 02
  • Location: Lisbon
  • OS: Windows Eight dot One dot One 1!one

Posted 08 May 2014 - 01:28

Is this for a server? Does it have a backplane? Does it support hotswap? If it does then why not replace it via hotswap?

 

don't over complicate, this is just an academic question: what YOU prefer and why?



#24 OP Praetor

Praetor

    ASCii / ANSi Designer

  • Tech Issues Solved: 7
  • Joined: 05-June 02
  • Location: Lisbon
  • OS: Windows Eight dot One dot One 1!one

Posted 08 May 2014 - 01:32

Why hot swap is simple, you don't effect users as much. They usually don't even notice it. I have never had a server completely go down because I hit swapped a drive in.

 

well, unless if it was RAID 0... :rofl:

or a RAID controller problem.



#25 Shiranui

Shiranui

    Iconoclast

  • Tech Issues Solved: 3
  • Joined: 24-December 03

Posted 08 May 2014 - 02:05

If it's OK to shutdown for a few minutes, then cold swap.
Otherwise, just hot swap it.

#26 sc302

sc302

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 36
  • Joined: 12-July 05
  • Location: NJ, USA

Posted 08 May 2014 - 04:00

well, unless if it was RAID 0... :rofl:

or a RAID controller problem.

To be fair if it were RAID 0, the server would be having major issues and users wouldn't be able to access their data anyway.  What difference would it make if it went down at that point.  A RAID controller issue probably the same thing, users wouldn't be able to access their data so again what difference would it make if it went down or not.  Can only really do a hot swap when a system is running, if it is down you can hot swap all you want, it will still be down.