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Short-range wireless router advice

short-range wireless router

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#1 68k

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 13:26

I'm after a wireless router that will transmit up to about 10-20m/32-65ft (through two brick walls). Speed is not to much of an issue - 200KBps will be fine.

 

Would one the the devices below suffice? There is no mention on their range:

- TP-Link TL-WR702N: http://www.tp-link.c...model=TL-WR702N

- Edimax BR-6258nL: http://www.edimax.co..._id=3&pl2_id=18

 

For now I've just been using my phone as a WiFi hotspot - it does the job perfectly. However, I'd prefer having a device powered from USB that supports hiding of the SSID, connected to my Ethernet router.




#2 HawkMan

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 13:28

why do you want to hide the SSID. it's rather pointless if you're doing it from an assumed security standpoint. 



#3 OP 68k

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 13:29

why do you want to hide the SSID. it's rather pointless if you're doing it from an assumed security standpoint. 

That's right, for security. I don't want my neighbors attempting to access/hack my network.



#4 Anibal P

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 13:37

Easy to get even if "hidden", use real security of you're so concerned about the neighbors 

 

WPA2/AES and decently secure password are all you really need, if you insist on being paranoid you could use MAC address filtering, but that's trivial to bypass



#5 OP 68k

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 13:49

Okay, I'm happy with WPA2 a secure password. That's what I use through my phone at the moment.

 

My main concern is the transmission range of the devices. A sales assistant told me the Edimax was only good for up to about 6m, but I find that a bit hard to believe, as WiFi USB dongles seem to go much further.



#6 Ambroos

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 13:49

That's right, for security. I don't want my neighbors attempting to access/hack my network.

 

No point. Once you try to connect to a hidden network your PC constantly broadcasts "Hello, is Network X available? Is Network X available? Is Network X available? ...".

 

Good WPA2 with AES and a long enough passphrase (just use a sentence you know with at least four words, for example) is all you need. And disable all forms of WPS (with PIN or a button to push). Those are security nightmares.

 

And people who work in stores are, in general, idiots. They'll say what they say to sell what they want to sell. If they're not thick brick walls you'll get through two walls with decent speeds with any more or less recent access point.



#7 Ambroos

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 13:57

Although I would always go for TP-Link over Edimax. TP-Link has an excellent reputation and really has amazing value-for-money hardware.



#8 Aergan

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 13:59

Depends on what you're classing as brick walls to be honest. I have a "breeze block" (high metal particle content) wall for the rear extension and it pretty much blocks all forms of 2.4Ghz communication, regardless of proximity.

 

In the study (former garage) we have 40cm thick wall comprised of reinforced concrete blocks which allows 2.4Ghz to penetrate through but pretty much blocks all 5Ghz.



#9 OP 68k

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 14:02

No point. Once you try to connect to a hidden network your PC constantly broadcasts "Hello, is Network X available? Is Network X available? Is Network X available? ...".

 

Good WPA2 with AES and a long enough passphrase (just use a sentence you know with at least four words, for example) is all you need. And disable all forms of WPS (with PIN or a button to push). Those are security nightmares.

 

And people who work in stores are, in general, idiots. They'll say what they say to sell what they want to sell. If they're not thick brick walls you'll get through two walls with decent speeds with any more or less recent access point.

Thanks for the tips. Looking at the product manuals I thought WPS would be a good thing!

 

WiFi is one thing I have studied into much.


Depends on what you're classing as brick walls to be honest. I have a "breeze block" (high metal particle content) wall for the rear extension and it pretty much blocks all forms of 2.4Ghz communication, regardless of proximity.

 

In the study (former garage) we have 40cm thick wall comprised of reinforced concrete blocks which allows 2.4Ghz to penetrate through but pretty much blocks all 5Ghz.

Just concrete bricks. No metal.



#10 Aergan

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 14:04

Thanks for the tips. Looking at the product manuals I thought WPS would be a good thing!

 

WiFi is one thing I have studied into much.


Just concrete bricks. No metal.

 

WPS is never a good thing and if your router brand is Netgear, it's actually impossible to completely disable WPS on certain models (despite a multitude of support forum arguments, they apparently know better).



#11 xrobwx

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 14:38

That's right, for security. I don't want my neighbors attempting to access/hack my network.

http://www.nirsoft.n...rk_watcher.html

 

This is what I use at home and work. It's simple to use. Shows everything that is using your wireless (and wired) network. You can name each connection for familiarity and if you spot one you don't recognize, you can go into your router (when you get one) and ip/mac address block the suspicious user.

This is a good router for the specs in your op. http://store.buffalo...0300/quantity.1