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Syringe Invention Seals Gunshot Wounds In Seconds

seals gunshot wounds us military medical revmedx bleeding

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#1 EZRecovery

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 21:38

The U.S. military had asked medical technology company RevMedx, to find a solution for helping stop gunshot and shrapnel wounds from excessive bleeding. This idea of using a foreign substance to plug a hole is not a new one.  The idea is a medical version of Fix-a-Flat; the foam that is squirted into punctured tyre to plug up the hole.

 

Andrew Barofsky, RevMedx’s CEO, said Instead of foam, it was a sponge that fixed the issue.  “One of the co-founders of the company, Dr. Ken Gregory, was shopping at a Williams-Sonoma and discovered this kitchen sponge that was dried and compressed. You’d bring it home, splash water under it, and it would pop up into a normal-sized kitchen sponge…That was kind of a light-bulb moment.”

 

The concept was eventually turned into XStat: a dose of tiny sponge-like discs that are injected into an open wound with a syringe. The sponges have been treated with an anti-hemorrhagic substance and can expand to 10x their original size in matter of seconds.  The effect is that it will plug the wound and also providing the needed compression to stop the bleeding.

 

wgno.com_.jpg

 

John Steinbaugh, a former Special Forces medic and the company’s director of strategic development, said it could be a revolutionary battlefield tool. He says “In battle, life is measured in blood, and the standard method of plugging wounds, packing them with gauze or tampons and then applying direct pressure for several minutes, can take several minutes too long.   Bleeding out is a major cause of fatalities…Three to five minutes can mean the difference between life and death…Medics were looking for something that “you fire and forget”…You put it in and the bleeding instantly stops.” “Every drop of blood on the battlefield is precious…The faster you can stop the bleeding, the higher the probability you can save a guy’s life.”

 

XStat has recently received FDA approval only 2 months ago and RevMedx is now ready to ship to medics, says Barofsky. The firm’s CEO is expecting to provide a limited quantity of XStats to the U.S. military this year.  With the hopes of expanding the market to different clients, like paramedics and law enforcement officers in the coming years.

 

[Image via wgno]

 

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#2 McKay

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 22:01

Is this just an improvement to existing stuff? I don't know about what the US Military use now, but the British Military already has a foam that can be squirted into a hole in the body, that expands and fills the cavity. It was brought in as an alternative to QuickClot powder, which had a habit of being blown into the wind in the Chopper and temporarily blinding the medics. A form of Quickclot still exists, but its bonded into bandages and dressings, and only affects the area the dressing is applied to. The old stuff was just a sachet of powder.

 

I remember in the training video back when we still used it, they slit a Pigs throat with a knife, and then poured it onto the area, the Pig survived. 



#3 PsYcHoKiLLa

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 22:27

The firm’s CEO is expecting to provide a limited quantity of XStats to the U.S. military this year.  With the hopes of expanding the market to different clients, like paramedics and law enforcement officers in the coming years

 

So, the implications of that are that military personnel are guinea pigs or that they're more important than civilians?



#4 notchinese

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 22:40

Or that the military is funding it and want first dibs?



#5 McKay

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 22:40

So, the implications of that are that military personnel are guinea pigs or that they're more important than civilians?

 

New medical inventions are usually invented for Military needs because regular civilian equipment often isn't up to the job. Remember most of the work on the patient is done in the back of a Chinook zipping accross the countryside. So new solutions are presented for uniquely military problems. These new breakthroughs often trickle down to Civilian Ambulances etc. 



#6 +LogicalApex

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 22:42

So, the implications of that are that military personnel are guinea pigs or that they're more important than civilians?

Likely, the military is willing to pay more and in turn can fund the expansion into other markets.



#7 Gerowen

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 22:54

So, the implications of that are that military personnel are guinea pigs or that they're more important than civilians?

The military has historically been on the fore-front of new technologies.  It's not that they are more important than civilians, but because they have a need for things, and they have the money, they are usually in a position to ask companies to develop these technologies.  A lot of times, these technologies are not created, and then released only to the military.  Like in this situation, development of the technology was started because the military was asking for a better way to stop bleeding.



#8 Hum

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 23:01

Sounds good.



#9 DocM

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 01:55

The US military version of this is more advanced than earlier efforts, and it's a major deal for trauma medicine. One version still being worked on is a foam that's injected into the abdominal cavity to stop internal bleeding. Keeps them from bleeding out on the way to a trauma center.

Other ongoing DARPA** efforts include robotic limbs, brain-machine interfaces for same, limb and spinal cord regeneration, portable telerobotic surgery units, and self-driving vehicles.

** Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Thread likely belongs in the Science forum.