Jump to content



Photo

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor defeated by Tea Party


  • Please log in to reply
39 replies to this topic

#1 DocM

DocM

    Neowinian Senior

  • 16,905 posts
  • Joined: 31-July 10
  • Location: Michigan

Posted 11 June 2014 - 00:40

His being perceived as soft on immigration has backfired in a huge way. Should be a signal to BOTH parties, especially with the headlines from Arizona and Texas about the Administration opening the floodgates.

http://m.washingtonp...411f_story.html

Eric Cantor succumbs to tea party challenger

In a stunning upset propelled by tea party activists, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) was defeated in Tuesday’s congressional primary, with insurgent David Brat delivering an unpredicted and devastating loss to the second most powerful Republican in the House who has widely been touted as a future speaker.

The race called shortly after 8 p.m. Eastern by the Associated Press.

Brat’s victory gives the GOP a volatile outlook for the rest of the campaign season, with the party establishment struggling late Tuesday to grapple with the news and tea party conservatives relishing a surprising win.

“This is an earthquake,” said former Minnesota congressman Vin Weber, a friend of Cantor’s. “No one thought he’d lose.” But Brat, tapping into conservative anger over Cantor’s role in supporting efforts to reform federal immigration laws, found a way to combat Cantor’s significant financial edge.
>




#2 bradsday

bradsday

    Neowinian

  • 368 posts
  • Joined: 26-November 05
  • Location: Bangkok, Thailand (American Abroad)
  • OS: Windows 8/7/Vista/XP - OSX 10.7 Lion
  • Phone: BlackBerry 9700

Posted 11 June 2014 - 09:01

It almost seems like we are headed to a three-party system.  I just hope that this fractioning of the GOP does not translate into division within the conservative voter base.  Even some moderates are beginning to take a conservative stance.  I suppose it is either that - or simply move out of the way.  There is no denying that a large segment of Americans want a turn back towards conservatism and responsible governance.



#3 OP DocM

DocM

    Neowinian Senior

  • 16,905 posts
  • Joined: 31-July 10
  • Location: Michigan

Posted 11 June 2014 - 09:55

This is shaping up as another Republican wave election like 1994 or 2010.

21 of the 36 Senate seats up are Democrats, and of those 7 are in states Romney easily won in 2012. Republicans need 6 to take over, and analysts are predicting a net Republican gain of 6-12.

The House is no contest - it'll stay Republican and they are expected to add 6-8 seats to their majority. The seat Cantor lost is a safe Republican one that'll just go more conservative.

#4 Fresh

Fresh

    It's always best Fresh!

  • 9,285 posts
  • Joined: 11-April 03
  • Location: United States

Posted 12 June 2014 - 13:50

I heard about 10,000 Dems helped the TP oust him....



#5 TPreston

TPreston

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,493 posts
  • Joined: 18-July 12
  • Location: Ireland
  • OS: Windows Embedded Standard 8 & Server 2012/08 Datacenter
  • Phone: Nokia Lumia 920

Posted 12 June 2014 - 19:35


 
Good going guys, That's whats needed some fresh new ideas :rolleyes:

#6 BlueScreenOfDeath

BlueScreenOfDeath

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,535 posts
  • Joined: 09-November 02
  • Location: Little Rock, AR
  • OS: Windows 8
  • Phone: Samsung Galaxy SIII

Posted 13 June 2014 - 17:27

It almost seems like we are headed to a three-party system.  I just hope that this fractioning of the GOP does not translate into division within the conservative voter base.  Even some moderates are beginning to take a conservative stance.  I suppose it is either that - or simply move out of the way.  There is no denying that a large segment of Americans want a turn back towards conservatism and responsible governance.

 

Yea it's fracturing alright... half bat-s*** crazy and full bat-sh*t crazy 



#7 COKid

COKid

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,909 posts
  • Joined: 07-April 10
  • Location: Loveland, CO

Posted 13 June 2014 - 17:44

Show me a party that is serious about balancing the budget and reducing the national debt (17 trillion plus) and they'll get my vote. I frankly don't see that in either the GOP or Dem party at this time. Even if the GOP gets control of both houses of Congress and the White House, will they have the guts to make the deep cuts? I don't know. I suppose the Dems will do what the GOP has done and block everything. It's not like the debt went down under Bush II.

 

I am fed up with both parties as you can see. This country needs a leader with some balls (sorry Hillary) for god's sakes! Yeah, I'll vote, but I see why a lot of people don't. It's a joke. These politicians all talk about how they are going to change Washington. But after they get there, it's more of the same bs.

 

Edit: Trillion, not billion.



#8 shockz

shockz

    Neowinian Senior

  • 19,603 posts
  • Joined: 09-November 01
  • Location: USA
  • OS: Windows 8
  • Phone: iPhone 5

Posted 13 June 2014 - 17:44

It almost seems like we are headed to a three-party system.  I just hope that this fractioning of the GOP does not translate into division within the conservative voter base.  Even some moderates are beginning to take a conservative stance.  I suppose it is either that - or simply move out of the way.  There is no denying that a large segment of Americans want a turn back towards conservatism and responsible governance.

 

Yes, we are, but even as a moderate I would be hard pressed to suddenly go from the middle to the far tea party right. The republican party is doing nobody a favor by voting these extreme right candidates in with primaries, because they will not appeal to the wider voting base. If the republican platform would moderate to the middle on social and science issues, I'd be happy voting for one, as I agree more with their fiscal and somewhat global stances. I disagree with most liberals on fiscal polices, but until the Republican party comes into this century on some things, I don't think they are going to appeal to many voters my age. A three party system would probably only benefit one side of the table, as chances are two of the parties are pretty much the same give or take a few things, that'll just split the vote on one side.



#9 Jason Stillion

Jason Stillion

    Neowinian

  • 1,331 posts
  • Joined: 04-April 12
  • Location: United States

Posted 13 June 2014 - 17:55

His being perceived as soft on immigration has backfired in a huge way. Should be a signal to BOTH parties, especially with the headlines from Arizona and Texas about the Administration opening the floodgates.

http://m.washingtonp...411f_story.html
 

 

Disagree, it could be a sign the people of Virginia disagree with current immigration policy. 

Other States will vary on their opinion. 

 

Extra Credits, usually weekly video cast on game / game industry had a really good point.

Having trouble finding the youtube link.

 

Gerrymandering is hurting moderates. With gerrymandering, it's consolidating your user base, however when they go more conservative your out.

The gerrymandering is used to win elections in your state, yet can distorts the view of the state, it's not necessarily the majority view of the state (sometimes it is) or give them an edge if it's a splitting the state. 



#10 theyarecomingforyou

theyarecomingforyou

    Tiger Trainer

  • 16,028 posts
  • Joined: 07-August 03
  • Location: Terra Prime Profession: Jaded Sceptic
  • OS: Windows 8.1
  • Phone: Galaxy Note 3 with Galaxy Gear

Posted 13 June 2014 - 17:58

Show me a party who is serious about balancing the budget and reducing the national debt (17 billion plus) and they'll get my vote. I frankly don't see that in either the GOP or Dem party at this time. Even if the GOP gets control of both houses of Congress and the White House, will they have the guts to make the deep cuts? I don't know. I suppose the Dems will do what the GOP has done and block everything. It's not like the debt went down under Bush II.

 

I am fed up with both parties as you can see. This country needs a leader with some balls (sorry Hillary) for god's sakes! Yeah, I'll vote, but I see why a lot of people don't. It's a joke. They all talk about how they are going to change Washington. But after they get there, it's more of the same bs.

Exactly. Obama talked about 'change' but all he delivered was Bush 2.0, while the GOP has made a dramatic shift to the right with candidates talking about stoning gay people to death. The 2016 election will likely be between Hillary Clinton, who is even more right-wing than Obama, or whichever lunatic or charlatan the GOP puts up. The only sensible potential candidate for a progressive America is Elizabeth Warren but without the Democratic nomination, which seems unlikely, she would only split the progressive vote.



#11 +Vykranth

Vykranth

    Chantez, compagnons, dans la nuit la Liberté nous écoute

  • 3,231 posts
  • Joined: 02-September 04
  • Location: Nancy, France
  • OS: Windows 7 x64

Posted 13 June 2014 - 20:34

Here is something about David Brat who defeated Eric Cantor.

 

http://blogs.wsj.com...l-happen-again/

 


Capitalism is here to stay, and we need a church model that corresponds to that reality. Read Nietzsche. Nietzsche’s diagnosis of the weak modern Christian democratic man was spot on. Jesus was a great man. Jesus said he was the Son of God. Jesus made things happen. Jesus had faith. Jesus actually made people better. Then came the Christians. What happened? What went wrong? We appear to be a bit passive. Hitler came along, and he did not meet with unified resistance. I have the sinking feeling that it could all happen again, quite easily. The church should rise up higher than Nietzsche could see and prove him wrong. We should love our neighbor so much that we actually believe in right and wrong, and do something about it. If we all did the right thing and had the guts to spread the word, we would not need the government to backstop every action we take.

 

So, Eric Cantor, super obstructionist and anti-Obama-everything has been replaced by someone even more extreme because Cantor commited the heresy of speaking about immigration reform.

The Tea Party is actually a GOP inquisition: they want only the purest form of conservative and anyone who dare speak the word 'compromise' is to be executed politcally

 

As BlueScreenOfDeath said, to batshit craziness and beyond !!!!!



#12 OP DocM

DocM

    Neowinian Senior

  • 16,905 posts
  • Joined: 31-July 10
  • Location: Michigan

Posted 13 June 2014 - 21:31

If only you knew how many rank & file Tea Party members are registered Democrats :)

#13 Stokkolm

Stokkolm

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,943 posts
  • Joined: 09-February 03
  • Location: Alaska
  • OS: Windows 8.1
  • Phone: Lumia 1520

Posted 13 June 2014 - 21:37

Yes, we are, but even as a moderate I would be hard pressed to suddenly go from the middle to the far tea party right. The republican party is doing nobody a favor by voting these extreme right candidates in with primaries, because they will not appeal to the wider voting base. If the republican platform would moderate to the middle on social and science issues, I'd be happy voting for one, as I agree more with their fiscal and somewhat global stances. I disagree with most liberals on fiscal polices, but until the Republican party comes into this century on some things, I don't think they are going to appeal to many voters my age. A three party system would probably only benefit one side of the table, as chances are two of the parties are pretty much the same give or take a few things, that'll just split the vote on one side.

The Republican party didn't vote these far right tea party candidates in, the people of their district, county, state, whatever, did that.



#14 OP DocM

DocM

    Neowinian Senior

  • 16,905 posts
  • Joined: 31-July 10
  • Location: Michigan

Posted 14 June 2014 - 03:15

That's a key point a lot of people miss, here in the US and overseas. The Tea Party and similar folks are there because large numbers of Americans voted them in and they're representing their constituents.

Unlike the common misperception the Tea Party movement is not monolithic. It's a loose affiliation of national, state and local groups without a central leadership, and in many states is a mix of Republicans, Democrats and Independents.

In our area there are quite a few Democrat Tea Party members.

And let's not forget what started the Tea Party's ascention: the Democrats bulldozing every Congressional rule, and common sense, in a rush to pass Obamacare. This ill considered move we now KNOW was poorly executed and continues to drive divisions in this country. It is VERY likely to cost Democrats a lot this November.

If the Democrats dislike the Tea Party I submit they have no one but the guy in the mirror to blame for its creation and rise.

#15 +Vykranth

Vykranth

    Chantez, compagnons, dans la nuit la Liberté nous écoute

  • 3,231 posts
  • Joined: 02-September 04
  • Location: Nancy, France
  • OS: Windows 7 x64

Posted 14 June 2014 - 07:42

That's a key point a lot of people miss, here in the US and overseas. The Tea Party and similar folks are there because large numbers of Americans voted them in and they're representing their constituents.

Unlike the common misperception the Tea Party movement is not monolithic. It's a loose affiliation of national, state and local groups without a central leadership, and in many states is a mix of Republicans, Democrats and Independents.

In our area there are quite a few Democrat Tea Party members.

And let's not forget what started the Tea Party's ascention: the Democrats bulldozing every Congressional rule, and common sense, in a rush to pass Obamacare. This ill considered move we now KNOW was poorly executed and continues to drive divisions in this country. It is VERY likely to cost Democrats a lot this November.

If the Democrats dislike the Tea Party I submit they have no one but the guy in the mirror to blame for its creation and rise.

 

Yeah, sure, the Tea Party is a grassroot movement not at all, started by Fox News/Rush Limbaugh at al. whose first manifestation did not start in February 2009 against the TARP and tax, not the ACA

 

http://en.wikipedia....party"_protests

 

Yeah, it is Wikipedia, just because I do not want to link all the references in that article.

 

You try to pass the Tea Party as a libertarian, less government freedom loving party. That might have been true at the beginning in 2009. In 2014, the Tea Party is a an extremist fringe of white supremacists, anti-union, vagina-obsessed, impeachment-hungry, birthers, racists, radical insurrectionists and pseudo anarchist theocrats like negro expert Cliven Bundy or his so-called friends who killed three people in Las Vegas two weeks ago.

 

Do I need to remind everyone of the government shutdown last October that lead to nothing ?

 

I may need to remind everyone of Karl Rove uber smear meister too

 

During the 2004 election, Karl Rove set the GOP strategy of activating conservative anger points like healthcare or immigration or same-sex marriage. Everything that stirred up the pot of hate and polarization?

 

You can read that in that book http://www.amazon.co...ing red America

But the evangelization of the Tea Party creation, that is just plain non-GMO, 100% pure bullcrap





Click here to login or here to register to remove this ad, it's free!