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NASA Orion crew exploration vehicle (updates)


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#106 OP DocM

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 09:05

One would hope so, but history says that like other govt. cost-plus boondoggles it'll be put on Joe Sixpack's tab.

Working both Imperial and metric in one project isn't unusual for NASA and it's contractors, and conversion issues have cost missions before. In controlling the Mars Climate Orbiter orbital insertion maneuver NASA's ground based trajectory calcs used pound-seconds instead of the orbiters newton-seconds, which didn't end well.


#107 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 10:34

Working both Imperial and metric in one project isn't unusual for NASA and it's contractors, and conversion issues have cost missions before. In controlling the Mars Climate Orbiter orbital insertion maneuver NASA's ground based trajectory calcs used pound-seconds instead of the orbiters newton-seconds, which didn't end well.

 

Blithering idiots.

 

Use 1 or the other, NEVER mix them!



#108 flyingskippy

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 11:34

Subcontractor of a subcontractor... no wonder why it was messed up.

#109 McCordRm

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 14:19

Measure twice, cut once.

But use the same damn ruler both times.



#110 BetaguyGZT

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 19:36

And this was better as opposed to using manpower and cranes to fabricate this vehicle ... how?

 

They built two different Saturn variants using traditional methods and it took less than two years from concept to having something on the Launch Pad ready to test. Of course, we remember the flaws with using a pure Oxygen atmosphere, but that was an issue with the spacecraft -- the launcher itself was ready.

 

Argh. Yet another example of the wrong people being in charge of things. This whole program is fubar, by my reckoning.



#111 malenfant

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 21:29

How can there be a miscommunication or error? Aren't the units of measurement right there in front of them. Isn't that what there for?

And vertical fabrication? Doesnt that seem awkward. Why not horizontal.

#112 OP DocM

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 22:02

Vertical fab because that's how they did it for Saturn V, and they're all about doing what they've always done.

Just look at Orion: it's a scaled up Apollo with steep sides even though a shallower side angle would give more internal volume per unit of diameter and likely a lower mass, Soyuz, Shinzhou and Dragon being successful examples.

From NASA's Saturn V history,

The vertical assembly mode was selected, even though a new high-bay area was required, because horizontal assembly posed problems in maintaining accuracy of joints in the heavy, but thin-walled tanks. In vertical assembly, gravity held the huge parts together, although a 198-metric-ton crane was required to hoist the parts atop each other, and to lower the completed booster back to the horizontal for final finishing.



#113 malenfant

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 22:23

Fair enough. It's always interesting to know why they go about something. I suppose it's silly to quibble over means when the end is pointless.

#114 OP DocM

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 23:33

Exactly. It's going to cost $billions per launch when 1) a larger, cheaper commercial launcher is in the pipeline, and 2) even without 1) a combo of commercial heavy's, tugs and depots could do the SLS missions cheaper.

#115 BetaguyGZT

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 23:37

I was under the impression that this Fabricator/Welder unit was different in every conceivable way from the older models. I stand corrected.



#116 Draggendrop

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 05:57

From my experience, you can not mix imperial and metric and expect precision. Not everyone is proficient in conversions and ultimately, the longer the supervisory tree, the more likely a mistake. The one I have forged in my head is the "Gimli glider" incident, the 767 which ran out of fuel in the early 80"s. As a side note, the maintenance crew that drove from Winnipeg to carry out repairs, also ran out of fuel..... :pinch: