Jump to content



Photo

fixing/creating MBR/grub loader?

Answered Go to the full post

  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Original Poster

Original Poster

    Systems Developer

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 15-July 08
  • Location: my room
  • OS: windows 7/8, Kali, ubuntu, OSx 10.9
  • Phone: Android

Posted 01 July 2014 - 20:38

I just installed a debian linux onto a box (i currently have no internet for it as i type this), then something went wrong on the install with the grub and it failed to install the loader... i have a live ubuntu USB I was wondering if anyone could tell me how to fix the MBR?



Best Answer Haggis , 01 July 2014 - 20:47

here you go

 

http://howtoubuntu.o...-ubuntu-live-cd

 

Mount the partition your Ubuntu Installation is on. If you are not sure which it is, launch GParted (included in the Live CD) and find out. It is usually a EXT4 Partition. Replace the XY with the drive letter, and partition number, for example: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt.

sudo mount /dev/sdXY /mnt

Now bind the directories that grub needs access to to detect other operating systems, like so.

sudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev &&
sudo mount --bind /dev/pts /mnt/dev/pts &&
sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc &&
sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys

Now we jump into that using chroot.

sudo chroot /mnt

Now install, check, and update grub.

This time you only need to add the drive letter (usually a) to replace X, for example: grub-install /dev/sda, grub-install –recheck /dev/sda.

grub-install /dev/sdX 

grub-install --recheck /dev/sdX 

update-grub

Now grub is back, all that is left is to exit the chrooted system and unmount everything.

exit &&
sudo umount /mnt/sys &&
sudo umount /mnt/proc &&
sudo umount /mnt/dev/pts &&
sudo umount /mnt/dev &&
sudo umount /mnt

Shut down and turn your computer back on, and you will be met with the default Grub2 screen.

Go to the full post



#2 Haggis

Haggis

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 12
  • Joined: 13-June 07
  • Location: Near Stirling, Scotland
  • OS: Debian 7
  • Phone: Samsung Galaxy S3 LTE (i9305)

Posted 01 July 2014 - 20:47   Best Answer

here you go

 

http://howtoubuntu.o...-ubuntu-live-cd

 

Mount the partition your Ubuntu Installation is on. If you are not sure which it is, launch GParted (included in the Live CD) and find out. It is usually a EXT4 Partition. Replace the XY with the drive letter, and partition number, for example: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt.

sudo mount /dev/sdXY /mnt

Now bind the directories that grub needs access to to detect other operating systems, like so.

sudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev &&
sudo mount --bind /dev/pts /mnt/dev/pts &&
sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc &&
sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys

Now we jump into that using chroot.

sudo chroot /mnt

Now install, check, and update grub.

This time you only need to add the drive letter (usually a) to replace X, for example: grub-install /dev/sda, grub-install –recheck /dev/sda.

grub-install /dev/sdX 

grub-install --recheck /dev/sdX 

update-grub

Now grub is back, all that is left is to exit the chrooted system and unmount everything.

exit &&
sudo umount /mnt/sys &&
sudo umount /mnt/proc &&
sudo umount /mnt/dev/pts &&
sudo umount /mnt/dev &&
sudo umount /mnt

Shut down and turn your computer back on, and you will be met with the default Grub2 screen.



#3 OP Original Poster

Original Poster

    Systems Developer

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 15-July 08
  • Location: my room
  • OS: windows 7/8, Kali, ubuntu, OSx 10.9
  • Phone: Android

Posted 01 July 2014 - 21:22

here you go

 

http://howtoubuntu.o...-ubuntu-live-cd

 

Mount the partition your Ubuntu Installation is on. If you are not sure which it is, launch GParted (included in the Live CD) and find out. It is usually a EXT4 Partition. Replace the XY with the drive letter, and partition number, for example: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt.

sudo mount /dev/sdXY /mnt

Now bind the directories that grub needs access to to detect other operating systems, like so.

sudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev &&
sudo mount --bind /dev/pts /mnt/dev/pts &&
sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc &&
sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys

Now we jump into that using chroot.

sudo chroot /mnt

Now install, check, and update grub.

This time you only need to add the drive letter (usually a) to replace X, for example: grub-install /dev/sda, grub-install –recheck /dev/sda.

grub-install /dev/sdX 

grub-install --recheck /dev/sdX 

update-grub

Now grub is back, all that is left is to exit the chrooted system and unmount everything.

exit &&
sudo umount /mnt/sys &&
sudo umount /mnt/proc &&
sudo umount /mnt/dev/pts &&
sudo umount /mnt/dev &&
sudo umount /mnt

Shut down and turn your computer back on, and you will be met with the default Grub2 screen.

life saver, thank you. worked great