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New Internet speed record blows past Google Fiber

usa internet bell labs copper landlines xg-fast

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#16 +_Alexander

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 14:40

Fibre has lower latency than Copper, but the underlying connection isn't the biggest problem, that's down to routers.

Before I switched to OpenWRT (with codel), the firmware on my router could add something like 1s of latency when congested. And you don't have any control over the routers between you and your destination.

As a gamer who complains all the time about dirty foreigners running the experience with high latency, I would rather invest in fiber nonetheless.


#17 jesseinsf

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 14:56

Bell Labs researchers just broke the broadband Internet speed record.

It is eight times faster than the previous record -- and it was done over copper landlines.

With speeds of 10 gigabits per second, Bell Labs' technology proved to be 1,000 times faster than traditional broadband speeds. It is even 10 times faster than Google (GOOGL, Tech30) Fiber, which offers the fastest broadband available to consumers.

Alcatel-Lucent (ALU), Bell Labs' parent company, dubbed the new technology "XG-FAST." The company called it a "major breakthrough," giving broadband companies the ability to provide fiber-optic-like speeds over the existing copper landline infrastructure that blankets most of America.

Verizon (VZ, Tech30) FiOS, Google Fiber and others have sought to bring ultra-fast fiber connections directly to people's homes. But the process is extremely expensive, and often involves digging up homeowners' yards. Providing fiber to the majority of American households could cost hundreds of billions -- or even trillions -- of dollars, depending on various estimates.

 XG-FAST could potentially make it unnecessary to bring expensive fiber for ultra-high-speed Internet.

Bell Labs says that XG-FAST can provide up to 10 gigabits per second over a distance of up to 30 meters. So if there is a fiber connection on the street, it would be sufficient to deliver lightning-fast Internet over a home's existing landline wires. For big buildings, fiber could be brought into the basement without needing to route it to individual apartments or offices.

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97.5 Feet is not that long. the lot I live on has 2 houses and the back house is over 100 Feet back. So no 10GB for the back house if they want the service.



#18 dragon2611

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 16:58

Fibre has lower latency than Copper, but the underlying connection isn't the biggest problem, that's down to routers.

Before I switched to OpenWRT (with codel), the firmware on my router could add something like 1s of latency when congested. And you don't have any control over the routers between you and your destination.

 

Bit of a difference between a SoHo router that's routing in Software on a Generic CPU (That said some of the newer ones do it in hardware) and a Carrier grade router that will be routing using ASICS built speifically to route packets at high speed.

 

That and most carriers would upgrade their equipment /links long before that became a problem, generally it's not good for bussness to let your network become so congested that customers start seeing a massive degridation in latency/performance.



#19 The_Decryptor

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 23:57

Yeah, the stuff us end users get is basically bottom of the barrel in quality, but even the high end stuff still imposes a slight amount of latency (Regenerating IPv4 checksums, matching a route, copying from one NIC to another, etc.)

There isn't one single cause of latency (ignoring the physical limits), it's a bunch of small issues that add a slight amount, which adds up.

#20 Auditor

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 00:10

And the other news the data cap is 100 GB, at least if this ever get offered in Canada and then just pay $0.50 per MB for over use.