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Waterblock for a AMD R9 270X...


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#1 Synthetic

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 01:16

I've looked and looked and looked but I can't find a total cover water block for a AMD R9 270X (more for sound then over clocking)... I know it's not the worlds fast card so the water cooking gods don't look down to fondly of these midrange cards. Was wondering if any of you guys might have come across anything?


#2 +Boo Berry

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 02:03

What vendor is the card from? Just a reference card? If a full cover block exists, you can find out here: http://www.coolingconfigurator.com/



#3 OP Synthetic

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 05:39

What vendor is the card from? Just a reference card? If a full cover block exists, you can find out here: http://www.coolingconfigurator.com/

It's a Sapphire Vapor-X R9 270X.



#4 Circaflex

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 20:22

I can't seem to find anything either, most fullcover blocks are made for the highend cards. It seems your only water solution would be a universal block (GPU core only) paired with heatsinks for the ram/vrms.

 

Some research showed me that you might be able to use blocks from previous cards but youd want to verify that before purchasing. 

 

 

"Because the Radeon R9 280X is based on a Tahiti XT GPU (the very same GPU used on the Radeon HD 7970 and HD 7950 graphics cards) and no prescribed reference design the majority of graphics card manufactured have simply re-used it's existing circuit board design - either the most commonly used design is a AMD reference design (109-C38637) or a proprietary design such as ASUS DirectCU II and MATRIX.

 

As a result a lot of these graphics cards can be used with EK-FC7970 CSQ series water block or other water blocks from EK's portfolio such as EK-FC7970 DCII. In order to simplify the search for suitable and compatible water block EK has added more than 15 different Radeon R9 280X (as well as numerous Radeon R9 270X and -R7 260X series) graphics cards from various manufacturers to EK Cooling Configurator database and compatible graphics cards are being added to the list on daily basis."

 

http://www.ekwb.com/...Radeon-R9-280X/

 

In my opinion you are best off using a universal block, unless this is a show machine or you want e-stats. Everytime you replace your GPU you then need a new full cover block, which means selling the old card is hard too you either find someone who wants a watercooled card and thats an easy sale or you find someone who wants only the card or just wants your block. The universal will allow you to use it (99% of the time) on your next card. 

 

I understand you were doing this more for the sound, but you can use passive heatsinks on the ram/vrms or a silent fan

 

What vendor is the card from? Just a reference card? If a full cover block exists, you can find out here: http://www.coolingconfigurator.com/

although EK provides a nice tool, they obviously only cater to their blocks but there are many other companies out there that make much better blocks than ek 

 

 

Do you already have a water loop or were you looking into this specifically because of the new graphics card? You can try one of these all in one coolers that many users seem to love, the NZXT Kraken series

 

http://www.overclock...aka-the-red-mod

 

http://www.anandtech...ng-for-your-gpu

 

 

 

AMD: R9 290X, 290, 280X*, 280*, 270X, 270 HD7970*, 7950*, 7870, 7850, 6970, 6950, 6870, 6850, 6790, 6770, 5870, 5850, 5830

The compatibility list is based on AMD's Radeon and NVIDIA's GeForce reference board layouts, screw spacing, and die height only. Please check the height restriction before purchase.

 

The biggest question you would need to answer would be, is this a reference design or did sapphire change the layout? This is always a tricky situation especially with the newer series of graphics cards and even more so after a few months have gone by since launch, the OEMs/partners seem to design different cooling situations which in turn leads to PCB changes



#5 OP Synthetic

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 17:46

I can't seem to find anything either, most fullcover blocks are made for the highend cards. It seems your only water solution would be a universal block (GPU core only) paired with heatsinks for the ram/vrms.

 

Some research showed me that you might be able to use blocks from previous cards but youd want to verify that before purchasing. 

 

 

http://www.ekwb.com/...Radeon-R9-280X/

 

In my opinion you are best off using a universal block, unless this is a show machine or you want e-stats. Everytime you replace your GPU you then need a new full cover block, which means selling the old card is hard too you either find someone who wants a watercooled card and thats an easy sale or you find someone who wants only the card or just wants your block. The universal will allow you to use it (99% of the time) on your next card. 

 

I understand you were doing this more for the sound, but you can use passive heatsinks on the ram/vrms or a silent fan

 

although EK provides a nice tool, they obviously only cater to their blocks but there are many other companies out there that make much better blocks than ek 

 

 

Do you already have a water loop or were you looking into this specifically because of the new graphics card? You can try one of these all in one coolers that many users seem to love, the NZXT Kraken series

 

http://www.overclock...aka-the-red-mod

 

http://www.anandtech...ng-for-your-gpu

 

 

The biggest question you would need to answer would be, is this a reference design or did sapphire change the layout? This is always a tricky situation especially with the newer series of graphics cards and even more so after a few months have gone by since launch, the OEMs/partners seem to design different cooling situations which in turn leads to PCB changes

Wow thanks for all the advice man! :D