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BSOD problem. Please help


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#1 rati2

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 17:15

Hi, i keep getting blue screen but only when i try to play games that are more demanding like Darksiders 2 or WItcher. The pc is new and i really don't know what the problem is. I used the whocrashed program and it gave me an analysis on the blue screen but i don't know what it means cause i'm not really experienced in computers. I'm going to post it here and if anyone knows what the problem is please answer if you can i'm pretty desperate and i honestly don't know what to do. So here it is:

 

On Thu 7/24/2014 5:00:06 PM GMT your computer crashed
crash dump file: C:\Windows\memory.dmp
This was probably caused by the following module: hal.dll (hal!HalBugCheckSystem+0x1E3)
Bugcheck code: 0x124 (0x0, 0xFFFFFA80080B3028, 0xB6000000, 0x100153)
Error: WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR
file path: C:\Windows\system32\hal.dll
product: Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
company: Microsoft Corporation
description: Hardware Abstraction Layer DLL
Bug check description: This bug check indicates that a fatal hardware error has occurred. This bug check uses the error data that is provided by the Windows Hardware Error Architecture (WHEA).
This is likely to be caused by a hardware problem problem. This problem might be caused by a thermal issue.
The crash took place in a standard Microsoft module. Your system configuration may be incorrect. Possibly this problem is caused by another driver on your system that cannot be identified at this time.
 




#2 LaP

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 17:27

You should start by listing the components in your PC.

 

Did you check if your PC was overheating? Usually good motherboard will close the PC when it happens but it might not be the case with your mb.



#3 +warwagon

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 17:37

The only components i'm curious about is power supply graphics card and CPU ... could care less about the rest. Only because we have to make sure your power supply is good enough to power the card. If you have more than 1 hard drive you can list those other wise skip it.

 

Because its dying in game I would make sure your PC is dust free and that your headsink or graphics card isn't clogged with dust. Thus overheating when you play your game.

 

Because he plays graphic intensive games we can assume he has a dedicated graphics card. Knowing which one won't help with the bluescreen. I would just say make sure your drivers are up to date. If you recently updated the drivers before this started happening roll them back. I would also recommend downloading hdtune pro http://www.hdtunepro.com and click on the error scan tab and do a scan (not a quickscan) this will scan your hard drive for bad sectors.

 

You may also want to download memtest and test your ram for a bad stick of ram.



#4 OP rati2

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 17:57

K so here are the components: 

Processor: AMD FX-6350, six-core, 3.9 GHz

Motherboard: Asus M5A97 LE R2.0 Socket AM3+

Memory ram: Kingston HyperX Genesis, DDR 3, 8Gb

GBU:Asus AMD Radeon R9 270

PSU: ATX Corsair 650W

 

Also i downloaded hdtunepro and its scanning right now.So far nothing but it;s only at about 20% so i'll post later with the result.

   

#5 LaP

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 18:57

The only components i'm curious about is power supply graphics card and CPU ...

 

Dunno i think the mb might be useful too.

 

Try running CoreTemp to see how high the cpu temp goes when playing games.

 

You computer looks fine. Should not have any compatibility problem with Corsair, Asus and Kingston. PSU is good enough. Is anything overclocked ?



#6 Tews

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 19:07

Stop 0x124 - what it means and what to try
Synopsis:

A "stop 0x124" is fundamentally different to many other types of bluescreens because it stems from a hardware complaint. Stop 0x124 minidumps contain very little practical information, and it is therefore necessary to approach the problem as a case of hardware in an unknown state of distress.


Generic "Stop 0x124" Troubleshooting Strategy:
1) Ensure that none of the hardware components are overclocked. Hardware that is driven beyond its design specifications - by overclocking - can malfunction in unpredictable ways.

2) Ensure that the machine is adequately cooled. If there is any doubt, open up the side of the PC case (be mindful of any relevant warranty conditions!) and point a mains fan squarely at the motherboard. That will rule out most (lack of) cooling issues.

3) Update all hardware-related drivers: video, sound, RAID (if any), NIC... anything that interacts with a piece of hardware. It is good practice to run the latest drivers anyway.

4) Update the motherboard BIOS according to the manufacturer's instructions. Their website should provide detailed instructions as to the brand and model-specific procedure.

5) Rarely, bugs in the OS may cause "false positive" 0x124 events where the hardware wasn't complaining but Windows thought otherwise (because of the bug). At the time of writing, Windows 7 is not known to suffer from any such defects, but it is nevertheless important to always keep Windows itself updated. 

6) Attempt to (stress) test those hardware components which can be put through their paces artificially. The most obvious examples are the RAM and HDD(s). For the RAM, use the in-built memory diagnostics (run MDSCHED) or the 3rd-party memtest86 utility to run many hours worth of testing. For hard drives, check whether CHKDSK /R finds any problems on the drive(s), notably "bad sectors". Unreliable RAM, in particular, is deadly as far as software is concerned, and anything other than a 100% clear memory test result is cause for concern. Unfortunately, even a 100% clear result from the diagnostics utilities does not guarantee that the RAM is free from defects - only that none were encountered during the test passes.

7) As the last of the non-invasive troubleshooting steps, perform a "vanilla" reinstallation of Windows: just the OS itself without any additional applications, games, utilities, updates, or new drivers -NOTHING AT ALL that is not sourced from the Windows 7 disc. Should that fail to mitigate the 0x124 problem, jump to the next steps. Otherwise, if you run the "vanilla" installation long enough to convince yourself that not a single 0x124 crash has occurred, start installing updates and applications slowly, always pausing between successive additions long enough to get a feel for whether the machine is still free from 0x124 crashes. Should the crashing resume, obviously the very last software addition(s) may be somehow linked to the root cause.
If stop 0x124 errors persist despite the steps above, and the harware is under warranty, consider returning it and requesting a replacement which does not suffer periodic MCE events. Be aware that attempting the subsequent harware troubleshooting steps may, in some cases, void your warranty:
8) Clean and carefully remove any dust from the inside of the machine. Reseat all connectors and memory modules. Use a can of compressed air to clean out the RAM DIMM sockets as much as possible.

9) If all else fails, start removing items of hardware one-by-one in the hope that the culprit is something non-essential which can be removed. Obviously, this type of testing is a lot easier if you've got access to equivalent components in order to perform swaps.
 
Should you find yourself in the situation of having performed all of the steps above without a resolution of the symptom, unfortunately the most likely reason is because the error message is literally correct - something is fundamentally wrong with the machine's hardware. 






=====================================================

Background Information:

Windows passes on the hardware error report in the form of a "stop 0x124" because it can't do anything else once the hardware has signalled an uncorrectable fault condition. In technical terms, the vast majority of stop 0x124 crashes correspond to "Machine Check Exceptions" (MCEs) issued by the processor to alert the software to the existence of a hardware problem. It's possible for drivers to indirectly induce hardware to register MCEs by "driving" in ways that are confusing to the hardware, but from a user's point of view that disctinction is so subtle as to be invisible.

It is important to note that there are many different possible MCE triggers, and one machine's stop 0x124 is likely to be entirely different to another's. Hence, it is best not to place too much emphasis on very specialised ways in which other individuals have resolved their own 0x124 problems - the more exotic the other machine's MCE solution, the less likely it is to apply to your own setup.

It is possible - but painful - to interpret the hardware's error report. It's passed along in the so-called "MCi_Status" register, the contents of which are generally visible as bugcheck parameters 3 and 4 on the BSOD screen, as well as in the corresponding minidump. 

The trouble is that the hardware's complaints are almost never "practical", in the sense that they would explain what is wrong in layman's terms and include a recommendation for how to fix it. Instead, it's esoteric stuff which is intended for hardware specialists and driver developers. 


Interpreting MCi_Status Contents:

This is not a viable troubleshooting methodology for most cases of stop 0x124 crashes, both because of the procedure's complexity and the impracticality of the resultant output. It is included here for the sake of completeness, and in case anyone should wish to go to the extreme in an attempt to understand recalcitrant stop 0x124 crashes on their machine.

Interpreting the numbers a matter of consulting information published by Intel and AMD. The MCi_Status register contents are a bitmask, and each individual bit has a very specific meaning. Reference:

http://download.inte....als/253668.pdf
http://www.amd.com/u....docs/24593.pdf
Machine Check Exception - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


#7 OP rati2

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 19:27

I think the problem might be it's overheating. My fan does make a real powerful noise and i used speedfan and it seems it heats up to about 60C but i don't know how to test if that is the real problem. I saw you said i should open my pc and use another fan to cool it and see if it works but sadly i don't have any fan i could use for this so is there any other way to find out if this is the problem?



#8 LaP

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 19:32

I think the problem might be it's overheating. My fan does make a real powerful noise and i used speedfan and it seems it heats up to about 60C but i don't know how to test if that is the real problem. I saw you said i should open my pc and use another fan to cool it and see if it works but sadly i don't have any fan i could use for this so is there any other way to find out if this is the problem?

 

60c is perfectly fine using a stock cooler while playing a game.



#9 Tews

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 19:43

I think the problem might be it's overheating. My fan does make a real powerful noise and i used speedfan and it seems it heats up to about 60C but i don't know how to test if that is the real problem. I saw you said i should open my pc and use another fan to cool it and see if it works but sadly i don't have any fan i could use for this so is there any other way to find out if this is the problem?

 

A big question.. Are you overclocking??  If so, stop and change back to standard settings while we continue to sort this out...



#10 OP rati2

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 19:54

No i'm not overclocking. Haven't changed any settings since i don't know much about this. I'm really mad since i just bought this pc and i'm already having difficulties with it. Truth to be told i've always seemed to have some kind of bad luck with computers. Either  something didn't work or something got broken. Pff guess it's just my luck...



#11 John.D

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 20:01

That stop error can also mean a buggy / faulty CPU. It is usually CPU-related. It can also be caused by bad cache (in the processor)



#12 Tews

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 20:15

Since your box is new, I'd RMA it straight away.  Call the store where you bought it and let them know so you can get a RMA number!   :D



#13 OP rati2

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 20:17

Well not quite because i bought it on pieces so i can't.



#14 Hum

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 20:21

Just removing the side panel can help lower the temperature.

 

Is the case on the floor ?

 

Don't have anything near, blocking the case.

 

If you are in a hot room, turn on the air conditioner, if possible.

 

A small floor fan can cost $25 or less.



#15 John.D

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 20:24

Well not quite because i bought it on pieces so i can't.

RMA the CPU then