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#1 Elliot B.

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:31

I am currently learning to drive in a manual car.

 

I've had 7x 1h lessons and I am still struggling with the clutch and gears. I don't really understand them.

 

A large part of me doesn't care about understanding them. I just want to drive.

 

I know automatic cars are more expensive to buy and maintain, as well as the lessons being more expensive.

 

Apparently the average amount of hours it takes to pass a driving test (I presume this is based on manual lessons) is 40 hours of lessons and 20 hours of personal practice.

 

Should I give myself another 3 hours of lessons (to total 10 hours) before I choose to instead learn in an automatic car? Or is it normal for people to still struggle with clutch/gears after their 10th hour of lessons?




#2 watkinsx2

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:38

Took me about to 1/2 through learning to drive and then it just sort of clicked. A lot of learning how to drive IS learning clutch control.  Getting an auto is taking the easy way out. 



#3 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:43

Took me about to 1/2 through learning to drive and then it just sort of clicked. A lot of learning how to drive IS learning clutch control.  Getting an auto is taking the easy way out. 

So it took you around 20-30 hours of overall driving before it clicked?



#4 Skiver

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:46

I think I had about 30 hours of lessons (admittedly I failed twice) to pass, I would definately stick at it as you don't want to limit yourself later on. I don't know how logn it took to get a full grasp on gears etc but you will get it eventually.



#5 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:47

I think I had about 30 hours of lessons (admittedly I failed twice) to pass, I would definately stick at it as you don't want to limit yourself later on. I don't know how logn it took to get a full grasp on gears etc but you will get it eventually.

I feel my driving instructor feels I should be getting it by now and he gets annoyed when I panic and stall because I can't remember what gear I am in or should be in or I forget to press the clutch to break (or press it when I don't need to! - so bloody confusing, sometimes you need the clutch to break, sometimes you don't, I don't understand - I'm ready to give up)



#6 Zoom7000

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:49

I started taking lessons at the age of 17 and knew absolutely nothing about manual gearboxes prior to my very first lesson. My dad used to be a driving instructor before I was born, but by the time I was a teenager, he had moved away from manual cars and has only driven automatic since. All in all, I took at 30 x 1hr lessons and maybe 5 x 2hr lessons before I was ready for my test and I passed on my second attempt.

 

I definitely would say stick with the manual. Once you have passed on manual, you are free to drive automatic. I've been driving manual for 12 years now and I finally bought an automatic after getting sick and tired of manual and clutch control in traffic crazy London! But having that manual experience is definitely something you don't wanna miss out on!



#7 mps69

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:50

It will all just click into place, just takes a bit of time and practice.

I found just learning to balance the clutch on a slight gradient helped me understand what was happening when I dipped the clutch and the car started to roll back, and when i pulled the clutch up while increasing the revs.

You also have to remember if you pass your test in an automatic, that's all you can drive in the future. At least if you learn the clutch you will have the best of both worlds.

Have patience my young padawan.



#8 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:52

I started taking lessons at the age of 17 and knew absolutely nothing about manual gearboxes prior to my very first lesson. My dad used to be a driving instructor before I was born, but by the time I was a teenager, he had moved away from manual cars and has only driven automatic since. All in all, I took at 30 x 1hr lessons and maybe 5 x 2hr lessons before I was ready for my test and I passed on my second attempt.

 

I definitely would say stick with the manual. Once you have passed on manual, you are free to drive automatic. I've been driving manual for 12 years now and I finally bought an automatic after getting sick and tired of manual and clutch control in traffic crazy London! But having that manual experience is definitely something you don't wanna miss out on!

Why? I'm perfectly happy buying automatic cars all my life. I don't see a downfall to it (cost isn't a downfall for me).

 

Americans get by just fine with automatic cars.

 

I won't have a need to drive someone else's manual car.



#9 Crisp

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:52

Everyone is different, you've got this far so I say crack on and keep going.

 

Do you have anyone close by who could take you off the road and have extra help getting more time in another car? It would help you out, might be more relaxed to.



#10 Torolol

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:52

7-hours? i need to learn it in half day, just to understand it.
Now i can do a downhill with just brakes & clutch, without any need pedaling the accelerates which increases my gas mileages.

#11 neoraptor

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:53

If you are having a problem with being smooth in changing gears here is what to do - release the clutch slowly and when you start moving (if you were stationary) just stop releasing it for 1-2-3 seconds, then continue releasing slowly. If the car is a diesel you won't need giving it much gas. If not and is a bit underpowered you'll need to give some gas (especially on hills).

 

If you have a car to practice - just do this - go to a parking, and try starting in second/third without gas (this is harder than first with gas) with the thing i told you above, if you do this smoothly you'll be able to start everywhere with any car.

 

Just pause for a second until the car is rolling (btw this is the time to start giving it gas)



#12 Vince800

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:53

Give it more time than 7 hours and if your driving instructor is not being supportive then switch to someone else. It really does make a world of difference if you're doing lessons with someone who has more consideration and patience. I was like you at first but you should soon get the hang of it after a while, 7 hours in is not a long time so stick at it. You can always buy an automatic once you pass your test but since you're in the UK it would be beneficial to be able to drive both.



#13 Zoom7000

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:54

I feel my driving instructor feels I should be getting it by now and he gets annoyed when I panic and stall because I can't remember what gear I am in or should be in or I forget to press the clutch to break (or press it when I don't need to! - so bloody confusing, sometimes you need the clutch to break, sometimes you don't, I don't understand - I'm ready to give up)

If you're instructor is getting annoyed with you and making you feel uncomfortable and/or panic, then definitely get rid of him.

 

Panicking, stalling and not knowing what gear you are in is all part of the learning process and if your instructor can't understand that, then you need to get another instructor!



#14 Unksi

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:55

I feel my driving instructor feels I should be getting it by now and he gets annoyed when I panic and stall because I can't remember what gear I am in or should be in or I forget to press the clutch to break (or press it when I don't need to! - so bloody confusing, sometimes you need the clutch to break, sometimes you don't, I don't understand - I'm ready to give up)

 

Usually, if you brake to slow down a little, you will not need to press the clutch. If you slow down a lot (enough that you would have to switch down gears), then you need to press the clutch while braking. This way you can also switch down the gears while braking.



#15 Xahid

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:55

I feel my driving instructor feels I should be getting it by now and he gets annoyed when I panic and stall because I can't remember what gear I am in or should be in or I forget to press the clutch to break (or press it when I don't need to! - so bloody confusing, sometimes you need the clutch to break, sometimes you don't, I don't understand - I'm ready to give up)

The speed can tell the difference, what gear you're in, but practice will make you perfect. take your time & keep practicing.

if your instructor can't answer your "confusing" questions, he is not the good instructor.