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Burger Robot Poised to Disrupt Fast Food Industry


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#76 Mikee4fun

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 06:25

Good news, the brats complaining about minimum wage perhaps should go back to school. On another note, I can't wait to have a GF robot, I will then no longer get bitched @  :laugh:




#77 OP DocM

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 07:35

Hmmmm....fembots ;)

#78 Shiranui

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 07:44

We will transition to a post-work society, where people will no longer have to work purely to stay alive. It is inevitable and a good thing. 

The problem is that, despite the fact that we are probably at least a century away from being in a position to make such a transition, technologically, culturally and geopolitically, we are being pushed prematurely in that direction (mostly by those already living in their own private post-work world.)

 

And don't for a moment think that this is primarily a blue-collar/working-class problem; on the contrary, white-collar workers are going to be hit just as hard, if not harder, and faster -- after all, computers are advancing far faster than robots.

20 years from now, you will be dreaming you could get a job flipping burgers. 



#79 My8th

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 08:35

Good news, the brats complaining about minimum wage perhaps should go back to school. On another note, I can't wait to have a GF robot, I will then no longer get bitched @  :laugh:

Instead of bitching at you she'll shoot at you with her hidden dual automatics.



#80 Hum

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 10:45

We will transition to a post-work society, where people will no longer have to work purely to stay alive. It is inevitable and a good thing. 

The problem is that, despite the fact that we are probably at least a century away from being in a position to make such a transition, technologically, culturally and geopolitically, we are being pushed prematurely in that direction (mostly by those already living in their own private post-work world.)

 

And don't for a moment think that this is primarily a blue-collar/working-class problem; on the contrary, white-collar workers are going to be hit just as hard, if not harder, and faster -- after all, computers are advancing far faster than robots.

20 years from now, you will be dreaming you could get a job flipping burgers. 

It will be interesting to see what people will do for 'money'.



#81 OP DocM

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 10:52

Barter credits.

#82 SierraSonic

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 15:47

Barter credits.

How do you progress with a barter system where the level of items used is freely distributed to everyone? You can't barter something everyone has, and by then everything should be available to everyone. What is the incentive to progress?

 

I think money will remain, just be used as an incentive to get more than the minimum. Sure you could live and be healthy and have fun, but no paid extras without work.

 

 

Good news, the brats complaining about minimum wage perhaps should go back to school. On another note, I can't wait to have a GF robot, I will then no longer get bitched @   :laugh:

 
As stated countless times, teenagers and those under 21 make up a small fraction of the work force, which is a constantly shrinking class of worker around the world, regardless of revenue. Something about causations and correlations and all that. It's obvious that if the required pay goes up, so do the requirements of work. Most companies will go for the worker they beleive will stay and offer their experience and services over taking on a new fresh hirer straight from school. The problem is, we are literally removing the jobs from the market where teens best fit: part time work, usually at fast food, but can be any entry level work, that could easily be replaced by robots.


#83 OP DocM

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 16:43

How do you progress with a barter system where the level of items used is freely distributed to everyone? You can't barter something everyone has, and by then everything should be available to everyone. What is the incentive to progress?
>


You are aware that barter groups are already rather common in the US, and that their are numerous local script currencies that function similarly?

Article on the rising barter economy
http://mobile.busine...-barter-economy

#84 SierraSonic

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Posted 12 August 2014 - 17:48

You are aware that barter groups are already rather common in the US, and that their are numerous local script currencies that function similarly?

Article on the rising barter economy
http://mobile.busine...-barter-economy

Yes I know bartering exists, I've played the craigslist trade up game. It's fine, but I still see issues when everything we need will be available to all for free and everything we want should still be available to everyone for free, as was talked about when money no longer becomes a requirement, same goes to skills and labor, with no incentive to have to work to receive anything, why bother bartering at all?

 

It works now only because things and services are not available to people so they can trade whatever either party need for what the other wants at the time. Remove the need from one side and bartering becomes pointless.