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JP6641

I have a question

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Hello,

 

I'm running on XP for what seems like forever and my PC is starting to show signs of decay.

 

So I currently stopped using Avast AV Free 2014 and generallly any free AV for that matter.

 

At the moment I am only running Malwarebytes Ant-Malware 2014. Which seems to work.

 

My question is what should I be thinking about doing at this point in moving forward?

 

Should I install an AV, consider upgrading my PC (its like at least a decade old)/

 

I really feel like I've somehow lost my way in keeping up with today's technology, what with life an all.

 

Anyway I would really value any kind of advice in moving forward.

 

Thank You.

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If the machine is Internet-connected, then you should definitely consider an upgrade to something that runs a less vulnerable operating system. What are your current hardware specs, and do you have a budget in mind for moving forward?

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If the machine is Internet-connected, then you should definitely consider an upgrade to something that runs a less vulnerable operating system. What are your current hardware specs, and do you have a budget in mind for moving forward?

 

 

How do I bring up the specs?

 

I don't have the packaging anymore.

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If the machine is Internet-connected, then you should definitely consider an upgrade to something that runs a less vulnerable operating system. What are your current hardware specs, and do you have a budget in mind for moving forward?

 

He said its 10 years old. Needs to be replaced.

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I right clicked on my computer and got these specs:

 

Pentium 4

CPU 2.80 Ghz

512 MB RAM

 

does that help?

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As zhangm said, you should really think about moving away from XP if you're going to be connecting the machine to the Internet.

So, are you looking to get a new machine, update the internals of your current machine, or are you just trying to see if you can change the OS without changing the hardware at all?

If you can provide the specs (Right-click on My Computer and select "properties" to get a basic spec list) then we can suggest if you need to switch the machine or not, although as episode says, if the machine is 10+ years old you may not have a choice.

EDIT: Ah, there we go, the specs! Hmm, the RAM definitely needs upgrading.

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With those specs, I'd look at buying a new machine. It'll be less hassles in the long run. You can't upgrade to Windows 7 or Windows 8 with 512 megs of RAM (Heck, it's hellish just running XP on 512 megs). Windows will refuse to install with anything less than 1 GB.

 

The slow down you feel is due to XP's infamous ability to fall apart over time. It's called Windows Rot, and has since been resolved with newer Windows versions.

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I recently had to upgrade an internal fan because too much dust was starting to accumulate quickly inside.

 

I would mostly be interested in upgrading the OS something like Windows 7 maybe.

 

Tthough I'm not sure if  I would have hardware issues in the long run.

 

Its a Dell Dimension 4600

 

>> http://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/19/product-support/servicetag/D0Y9B41/configuration

 

I'm worried that if I get a new PC I wouldn't be able to transfer the data on my hard drives to a new one.

 

I've been on here a couple of times and had some real swell advice from people.

 

So I reallly appreciate your guys help. :)

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Pentium 4

CPU 2.80 Ghz

512 MB RAM

Personally.. time to upgrade. You'd have a hard time running pretty much anything remotely current on that, even a lightweight Linux distro would be hard pressed with only 512MB unless you want to go the hardcore barebones route. If anything turn it into a file server or something and move on.

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It's understandable that the machine feels slow, especially with any kind of real-time AV protection processes running.

As Nick stated, a RAM upgrade typically will help with how responsive a system feels, but there can be limitations on how much RAM a system can recognize, and older RAM (out of mass manufacturing) can also be more expensive. If you have a couple hundred dollars available, you can get a serviceable new computer. We'll get a better idea after looking up your motherboard specs, to get an idea of how far you can go with upgrading the current system vs buying a new one.

Edit: four slots, DDR, max 4 GB.

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I'm worried that if I get a new PC I wouldn't be able to transfer the data on my hard drives to a new one.

Why are you worried about that? Is there a history of having these issues? Transferring data from one drive to another is a fairly painless process depending on the resources available to you.

I think the general consenus is that you should get a new machine. I think we used to have that model in our house until a couple of years ago, and it was absolutely horrible to use towards the end.

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With those specs, I'd look at buying a new machine. It'll be less hassles in the long run. You can't upgrade to Windows 7 or Windows 8 with 512 megs of RAM (Heck, it's hellish just running XP on 512 megs). Windows will refuse to install with anything less than 1 GB.

 

The slow down you feel is due to XP's infamous ability to fall apart over time. It's called Windows Rot, and has since been resolved with newer Windows versions.

 

Wow yeah I read stories like that whenever i had to track down those incrimental updates from auto update.

 

Right now I'm looking around seeing what would be the better path, slow incrimental updates like to the OS or just a complete overhaul of the system.

 

I don't have much of a budget at the moment but I would definately like to play catch up on this project and maybe have a sound stable machine some day soon.

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Why are you worried about that? Is there a history of having these issues? Transferring data from one drive to another is a fairly painless process depending on the resources available to you.

I think the general consenus is that you should get a new machine. I think we used to have that model in our house until a couple of years ago, and it was absolutely horrible to use towards the end.

 

It would be mostly due to from what I've read about software / hardware incompatabilites.

 

Would that be a factor or am I still okay to migrate my files to a new hard drive?

It's understandable that the machine feels slow, especially with any kind of real-time AV protection processes running.

As Nick stated, a RAM upgrade typically will help with how responsive a system feels, but there can be limitations on how much RAM a system can recognize, and older RAM (out of mass manufacturing) can also be more expensive. If you have a couple hundred dollars available, you can get a serviceable new computer. We'll get a better idea after looking up your motherboard specs, to get an idea of how far you can go with upgrading the current system vs buying a new one.

Edit: four slots, DDR, max 4 GB.

 

That would be so helpful, I really appreciate that. :)

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Here's what I would recommend since you're saying you don't have the cash:

 

Go on tigerdirect.com and buy a refurb/off-lease machine.

 

Like this one: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=9089599&CatId=5138

 

Less than $150, comes with Win 7 (its only 32bit but you could wipe and install 64bit from the key). The 7 license alone would cost you at least half that, and you're getting a huge upgrade in terms of usability for the remaining $75-ish. 

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It would be mostly due to from what I've read about software / hardware incompatabilites.

 

Would that be a factor or am I still okay to migrate my files to a new hard drive?

 

That would be so helpful, I really appreciate that. :)

I'm seeing that upgrading to a full 4 GB of memory would be about 70$. If you're also going to upgrade the operating system, then the license cost would actually bring the full price to that of a budget PC with modern specs. A new basic system from Dell costs about 250$. A return/refurb would be in the realm of what you'd spend on an in-place upgrade while offering better performance, so the best deal is to save for a new system.

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Here's what I would recommend since you're saying you don't have the cash:

 

Go on tigerdirect.com and buy a refurb/off-lease machine.

 

Like this one: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=9089599&CatId=5138

 

Less than $150, comes with Win 7 (its only 32bit but you could wipe and install 64bit from the key). The 7 license alone would cost you at least half that, and you're getting a huge upgrade in terms of usability for the remaining $75-ish. 

 

 

There's a Tiger Direct Store here in town, should I maybe go check out?

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You'll be happy with a refurbished system - even if you were to upgrade the RAM and OS, you'd still be left with a slow, and limited hard drive, which after 10 years, could die at any second.

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There's a Tiger Direct Store here in town, should I maybe go check out?

 

I don't know what they stock as far as refurbs in store, but its worth a shot.

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You'll be happy with a refurbished system - even if you were to upgrade the RAM and OS, you'd still be left with a slow, and limited hard drive, which after 10 years, could die at any second.

 

This is true and I've had that pointed out quite a few times.

 

Hmmm.

I don't know what they stock as far as refurbs in store, but its worth a shot.

 

 

Wouldn't it be nice to ask online, "Excuse me but can you go check in the back". lol.

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Hello,

 

As previously noted, you are likely to be best served by purchasing a new computer. 

 

If you have any licensed software on your old computer, I would suggest recording the serial numbers (a text file work great) and download the latest versions that work with those serial numbers to a USB flash drive, external hard disk drive, etc., they will be ready to install when you receive your new computer.  Don't forget the anti-malware software as well, just in case your new computer doesn't come with any (or if you want to replace what comes with it with your preferred software).

 

Before you use the new computer on the Internet, be sure to run Microsoft Update to install whatever updates, patches, hotfixes, etc., are available for it, as chances are it is going to be missing a few of the newer ones.  If you buy a brand name computer (Dell, HP, Lenovo, etc.) it may come with an additional manufacturer-specific utility to update its drivers and model-specific software.  Be sure to run that as well.

 

From looking at the specs, I believe the Dell Dimension 4600 shipped with a PATA hard disk drive, which means you'll need an adapter of some sort to plug it into your computer to copy your data files off of it.  Of course, it might be a different type of drive if that's been replaced over the past ten years.  In any case, there are USB to PATA/SATA adapter cables which can be purchased for around $10-20 that you can use to transfer the data. 

 

Another option would be to connect both computers to a router, switch or hub and copy files across the local network from the old computer to the new, but this implies that you have a keyboard, mouse and monitor set up on both computers (or can easily move them between the two computers) and the space to do so.  If you don't, pulling the drive as mentioned above might be a better route for you.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

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I'm worried that if I get a new PC I wouldn't be able to transfer the data on my hard drives to a new one.

 

You can use the transfer cable connected both ends (old and new pcs) then transfer your files from old to new pc...

 

or take the hard drive out and insert it in your new pc as slave...

 

or take it to the store and the tech will be happy to transfer the data from old to new hard drives for you.. no problem.

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"best served by purchasing a new computer. "

This - I would not spend 1 penny on a 10 year old box, you could buy the cheapest model out there and it would be like warp drive..

We just got friend who had a 8 year old machine a $250 laptop from lenovo http://shop.lenovo.com/us/en/laptops/lenovo/g-series/g50-30/ because she was on very tight budget as well.

It is like a lamborghini compared to her old model T ;)

You can buy a current machine for really cheap these days, now I know $250 is a lot to some - if so, then live with your model T for few more months, until you can spend at least that much. Don't spend or think of putting 1 penny into such a old device IMPO!!

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