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NASA Commercial Crew selections


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#31 bguy_1986

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 21:35

DocM, on 16 Sept 2014 - 17:19, said:

At the Dragon V2 reveal Musk said 2016 for their first orbital flights.

Dragon V2 pad abort test in November 2014, flight abort in January 2015, unmanned orbital test in early 2016 and crewed orbital test later that year.

Launch America program posters,
 

I'm impatient... Why such a long wait between flight abort and orbital test?




#32 OP DocM

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 21:51

SpaceX: EC/LSS (environmental control & life support systems) integration and testing, risk reduction on landing systems (FireFly tests), avionics and flight interface work, robotic autonomous flight system software & ground tests etc.

Boeing: "The spacecraft will undergo a pad-abort test in 2016, an uncrewed flight in early 2017, leading up to the first crewed flight to the ISS in mid-2017," plus everything SpaceX is doing, though Boring's landing system is air bags and not 8 big damned thrusters.

So, with a slip Boeing's first crewed flight could end up in 2018.

And in that time they may be working with Blue Origin on an RD-180 replacement engine for Atlas V.

Yeah, you read that right. Those engine announcements will likely come in the next few days.

#33 Beittil

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 21:59

Probably because the abort test articles arn't full up v2's. They are cargo variants with superdraco's attached if i am not mistaken! One could assume that SpaceX would want the orbital test to be done with an actual v2.

#34 malenfant

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 22:09

Blue Origin -Billionaire dilettante or Dark Horse?

#35 OP DocM

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 22:11

Probably because the abort test articles arn't full up v2's. They are cargo variants with superdraco's attached if i am not mistaken! One could assume that SpaceX would want the orbital test to be done with an actual v2.

No, the abort vehicle is a Dragon V2. They plan on using the same one for both abort tests.

There are major changes to the pressure hull for the life support system, enlarging the service bay, moving the parachutes, mounting the SuperDraco thrusters, major changes to the upper bulkhead for docking adapters and the LIDAR, and strengthening everything for landings and mounting the legs.

Their assembly line is now producing both Dragon V1 and Dragon V2 in parallel, though at different paces for now.

#36 Beittil

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 22:15

Ah ok,good to know. Nm my previous comment then :)

#37 OP DocM

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 23:29



#38 IsItPluggedIn

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 00:31

So they funded Boeing because they wouldnt have made it otherwise, and didnt fund the Dreamchaser because its going to be funded privately. Makes sense from a government point of view, now they have 3 craft instead of 2.



#39 OP DocM

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 01:20

They funded the capsules because they more closely meet NASA's needs and goals.

Dragon can carry large amounts of unpressurized cargo in its trunk, even more with the optional enhanced 34 m3 trunk. CST-100 can be adapted to do so. The specs for the upcoming second round of commercial cargo male clear this is a priority. Dream Chaser cannot carry unpressurized cargo, and a container attached to its rear hatch would get fried by its rear-facing engines.

Both capsules have the potential to go beyond Earth orbit to perform cargo and crew runs to lunar orbit or Lagrange points. This wasn't a stated goal for CCtCap, but it's in the cards regardless. Dream Chaser cannot.

IMO one of the things that hurt Dream Chaser was that they recently ditched the hybrid engines they've already certified in favor of the ORBITEC Liquid Vortex engines. This is a reset that absolutely increases the risk of their program not finishing by 2016-2017. Granted - liquid engines are the better choice because they're more efficient and lighter, but that was a decision that should have been made 2-3 years ago.