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Your computer is infected, Call tech support online now!


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#1 +warwagon

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 18:06

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I've been getting a lot of calls about this recently. It's basically just a popup that appears on a persons computer screen while browsing the net. The person then (Most if not all the time) calls the number and then is persuaded to let the person on the other end of the phone remotely connect to their machine. I don't think they do anything bad to the machine or install any malicious software, they basically just open up things like the Event viewer and tell them everything they see is a virus on their computer.

 

They then try to sell the person a security package .. one of my customers said she gave them $600. Which some how she did get back and also changed her card number.

 

Every customer who has contacted me about this says, they have called the number, they did let them onto their machine. Some gave them money, other have gotten suspicious when they ask for money.

 

The person who gave them the $600 told me and I quote "I'm going to call Norton and have them explain why their antivirus let all these viruses on my system *face palm*




#2 tiagosilva29

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 18:14

This is sad.

#3 Max Norris

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 18:22

No a big surprise.. it's impossible to lock down the biggest security problem that can hit the OS.. the person at the keyboard. Doesn't matter what OS or browser you're using, you can't fix gullible. First thing I tell people when setting up a machine for them.. the internet is a liar.

#4 +RedReddington

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 18:32

See sometimes, I would go out of my way to say "Please call Norton, This level of customer service is unacceptable" Then ask them a few days later how it went.....



#5 Dot Matrix

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 18:38

Warwagon, have you thought about turning on IE's security features, and setting up a few TPL's? There's little reason for people to be seeing this stuff nowadays.



#6 OP +warwagon

warwagon

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 18:52

Warwagon, have you thought about turning on IE's security features, and setting up a few TPL's? There's little reason for people to be seeing this stuff nowadays.

 

 Apparently the default configuration that the average consumer uses allows them to see this stuff. I've seen this on all versions of Windows, in IE and Chome.



#7 Nick H.

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 19:21

Wouldn't work outside of the US unless the pop-up changes the number. ;)

SDDD (Same Deal, Different Day - keep it forum friendly ;) ) really. We get "Microsoft" phoning people around here up all the time, telling them that their computer is infected. The user then does the same thing and allows the person to remote in to their computer. The difference in the scam that I know of though is that while the user pays money to get the "problem" "fixed" is that "Microsoft" then goes to System 32, finds the driver folder and then says to the user, "you see all these files? Those are viruses." The user is more than happy for them to delete those files. :pinch:

Another one that was making the rounds was a pop-up that says that the computer has been restricted by the FBI - why they have jurisdiction around here is beyond me - and that in order to unlock the machine the user needs to pay 300 Euros to get it fixed. A friend phoned me in a panic when he got one, and got a bit offended when I laughed over the phone. 30 minutes later, problem solved.

It looks like you can close that pop-up though...people need to remember the 90's a bit more, that's when I noticed these kind of scams happening, although I wouldn't be surprised to find out it was happening long before.

#8 simplezz

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 19:33

Noscript + ABP always ;) Your customer isn't still using IE is she? Not trying to start a flame war. Just saying that generally I see more people have problems with this stuff while using IE.

#9 Top Qat

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 19:38

 

they basically just open up things like the Event viewer and tell them everything they see is a virus on their computer.

 

Wrong, they have a second person looking thru the documents for bank details and passwords.

Some guy did this with a virtual machine and logged all file access.

 

Those people need to check if they have been compromised in any way!



#10 Dot Matrix

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 19:39

 Apparently the default configuration that the average consumer uses allows them to see this stuff. I've seen this on all versions of Windows, in IE and Chome.

They shouldn't be. IE, Chrome, and Firefox all have protections in place to prevent redirects, opening malicious sites, etc from happening.



#11 Tech Star

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 19:43

Been happening on Mac's as well. Been telling people to just hold the shift key when opening safari (or any other browser) so it opens to the homepage and not to the previously loaded page. Apparently, it has been locking up computers as well. 



#12 OP +warwagon

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 19:45

Wrong, they have a second person looking thru the documents for bank details and passwords.

Some guy did this with a virtual machine and logged all file access.

 

Those people need to check if they have been compromised in any way!

 

When these people use logmein and teamviewer, how are they accessing the files from the background without downloading them.



#13 Top Qat

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 19:48

When these people use logmein and teamviewer, how are they accessing the files from the background without downloading them.

 

Dunno how but that's why they want access. They want information to scam and defraud. I will try find that article.



#14 Dot Matrix

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 19:51

When these people use logmein and teamviewer, how are they accessing the files from the background without downloading them.

LogMeIn has an option where two or more people can be connected to a single session.