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Potential new build. What do you think?

new build pc desktop haswell-e ddr4

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#1 +FiB3R

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 20:28

Finally getting around to replacing my ageing desktop which I built in 2007 (it's had a few upgrades since then, SSD and RAM) http://www.neowin.ne...ing-rig-advice/ (that old post looks a mess now, due to a forum upgrade some time ago)

 

Anyways, I would like your opinions on my current component choices, if you would be so kind :)

 

Corsair Obsidian 550D - £109.99

Asus X99-DELUXE Intel X99 Socket 2011-3 Motherboard - £293.99

Intel Core i7 5820K Haswell-E - £290.60

Corsair Vengeance LPX Red 16GB DDR4 2800 - £283.73

 

EVGA GeForce GTX 760 Superclocked ACX Nvidia Graphics Card - 2GB - £183.31

Samsung MZ-7TE120BW 840 EVO 120GB - £58.61 x2 for RAID0?

Seasonic SS-750RM 750W 80+ Gold Hybrid Modular PSU £99.71

Corsair Hydro Series H100i Refurbished - £49.32

Noctua NF-F12 - £15.75 (x2 = £31.48)


£1400.74 with 1x SSD
£1459.35 with 2x SSD




#2 +Brando212

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 20:39

looks like a good build to me

 

also that looks like a great case thumbs_up.gif have not seen that model before



#3 Andre S.

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 04:58

If it's gaming performance you're after, you'd get much more out of your money by getting a better graphics card and choosing another CPU/platform. The i7-4790K with a Z97 motherboard would make more sense; even the i5-4690K would still be a great choice for video games. Unless you really plan on doing a lot of long-running heavily multithreaded tasks, you're not going to benefit much from a 6-core CPU. Keep in minds all these X99 motherboards are brand new with consequently immature BIOSes.

 

Why would you want another SSD in RAID0? You'd gain more by using the other SSD for storage and making access to that data faster instead.



#4 eddman

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 05:14

What are the main, heavy tasks that you perform on your computer? Gaming? Video editing? Graphic design?

 

If you're looking to build it for gaming, then I second Andre S. (Hey, I'm andre too :D).

 

Haswell-E is an overkill for gaming. You can save a LOT by going with a cheaper i7 or even i5 and also on the MB and RAM, as a result, and use that money to get a faster video card.

 

As for storage; a single 120 GB isn't really enough. Either go with at least 240/256 GB or two 120/128 GB as you mentioned, but SSDs are quite fast already. Is it really necessary to do a RAID 0 setup? I don't know. Others will know better, I guess.



#5 +PeterUK

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 08:42

Do you really need the Asus X99-DELUXE? The Gigabyte GA-X99-UD4 thats out of stock at Scan might be a better choice unless you need wireless without using a PCI-e slot or USB. Ebuyer has it in stock.
http://www.ebuyer.co...oard-ga-x99-ud4
also some G.Skill 16GB (4x4GB)Ripjaws 4 PC4-24000 / DDR4 3000 Mhz 15-15-15-35 1.35V
http://www.ebuyer.co...-3000c15q-16grr

Only going to use one GPU? A 650W PSU will be more then enough
http://www.scan.co.u...n-atx-psu-dc-dc

With them saving you can get a  4GB Gainward GTX 770
http://www.scan.co.u...es-1536-dport-d



#6 Ambroos

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 08:49

Don't go for two SSDs in RAID0, you will only notice the difference in sequential benchmarks. Some things that are more important (random access and access speed) suffer in RAID.

 

A bigger, single SSD will most likely be faster in real-world usage. I'd recommend the Crucial MX100 256GB (or even the 512GB), they're excellent quality and one of the only consumer SSDs with power loss protection. Otherwise the Samsung 840 EVOs are fine too. In general, avoid 128GB SSDs. They are usually a good chunk slower than their 256GB counterparts.

 

Besides that, you'll have a beast for anything CPU-intensive. I built a rig with a 4790k and a 256GB MX100 a few weeks back, those things fly. Personally I decided not to wait since the things I use benefit more from a few high-Ghz cores and scale less good over at more than 4 cores, but if you're doing anything like video processing you'll have an incredibly powerful machine.



#7 OP +FiB3R

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 10:31

Thanks for the input guys, I've been hearing the same stuff from other sources regarding gaming performance/value for money.

I suppose the real reason I went for Haswell-E, X99, DDR4 is because it's the latest architecture, and I think that means it will give me the greatest upgrade path in the future.

It is overkill for my needs, but then at the time, so was the system it's replacing, but the fact that I've gotten 7 years out of it seems to make it worth while.

Am I correct with that logic?

Thanks for the info about RAID0, I thought the performance gains would be significant. I guess times have changed, or has it always been a fallacy?

I don't need wireless, so I'll definitely take a closer look at that mobo, Peter. I'm thinking of going with dual gfx cards in the future (if its worth it) so I want a beefy enough PSU to expand the system at some point down the line.

Also considering a stronger gfx card off the bat.

I've had a bit of a windfall, hence the opportunity to upgrade.

I don't want to over spend, but at the same time, I want something that will last.

#8 +PeterUK

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 11:09

Peter. I'm thinking of going with dual gfx cards in the future (if its worth it) so I want a beefy enough PSU to expand the system at some point down the line.

If your thinking of going dual card a 800W+ PSU would be suggested to go with.

http://www.scan.co.u...0mm-fan-atx-psu

or

http://www.scan.co.u...ull-modular-psu



#9 OP +FiB3R

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 14:08

Good call on the PSU, decided to go with the Seasonic M1211-850 EVO Edition

 

The G.Skill memory seems like a much better deal too. Cheaper, faster clock speed and lower latency. Am I missing something there?

 

Still haven't really looked into the mobo and gfx card yet, getting ready to go out tonight, so not going to have much of a chance to really study the options as soon as I would have liked. :/



#10 shozilla

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 14:17

Please do the following steps:

 

1) Put the new build in the box.

2) Close it up and tape it down.

3) Insert 2 labels on it (addressee and return address)

4) Go to UPS and drop it off.

5) Send me the tracking number.

6) You will be notified when I get the package from you.

7) Wait for the mail for the reward.

 

 

:p

 

Joking aside, Nice biuld!  Good luck with it. :D



#11 Andre S.

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 14:43

I suppose the real reason I went for Haswell-E, X99, DDR4 is because it's the latest architecture, and I think that means it will give me the greatest upgrade path in the future.

It is overkill for my needs, but then at the time, so was the system it's replacing, but the fact that I've gotten 7 years out of it seems to make it worth while.

Am I correct with that logic?

It's unlikely you will ever upgrade the CPU or RAM on your X99 motherboard. You're spending a lot of money up front on purely hypothetical savings several years from now with little benefit to no benefit to the applications you will actually be running. That doesn't ring like sound logic to me. You'd get more out of your money by optimizing your computer for the tasks you want to do now (i.e., downgrade the CPU, motherboard and RAM, and upgrade the GPU), and keeping any leftovers for a future upgrade that'll also really benefit you. 



#12 OP +FiB3R

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 15:09

It's unlikely you will ever upgrade the CPU or RAM on your X99 motherboard. You're spending a lot of money up front on purely hypothetical savings several years from now with little benefit to no benefit to the applications you will actually be running. That doesn't ring like sound logic to me. You'd get more out of your money by optimizing your computer for the tasks you want to do now (i.e., downgrade the CPU, motherboard and RAM, and upgrade the GPU), and keeping any leftovers for a future upgrade that'll also really benefit you. 

Why is it unlikely? I upgraded the ram on my last system, and always considered upgrading the CPU.

 

I'm not sure, but the upgrade options for my current system were not that great, the last time I checked.

 

It is also the current raw power that I am considering, as well as the longevity, due to potential upgrade paths. Am I wrong in thinking that this new platform will have more scope for upgrades in the future?

 

I do all sorts of stuff with my PC, Photo/Video editing, 3D rendering, so not just gaming. But I do not do any of that professionally or even that regularly. I am an enthusiast, and a tinkerer, and to have the power there would be nice.

 

As for leftover money going towards future upgrades, that won't really happen. If I have the money at the time, I'll buy something, if I don't (which is most of the time), then I don't.

 

I don't want to sound like I'm just flat out ignoring your advice, otherwise what was the point of me asking for it? I'm just trying to battle it out in my own mind.

 

You do make some valid points, but I like shiny new things, but it is large chunk of change. Urgh :wacko:



#13 Andre S.

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 20:11

I'm not sure about the longevity of socket LGA-2011, I don't think anyone can say for how long Intel will keep using it. LGA-1150 will be used for Broadwell at least. Either way, several years down the line sockets will probably change so by that time if you want to upgrade the CPU you'll have to get a new motherboard anyway. I guess it boils down to being able to add more DDR4 eventually instead of being stuck with DDR3. So far DDR4 hasn't proved to provide substantial performance improvements in benchmarks AFAIK. 



#14 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 20:42

@ andre, I too was expecting more comments on the cpu.

 

Any reason why not put more money towards video card and not as much to mobo? or maybe AMD  R9-280X ?



#15 Ambroos

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 20:52

Just remember that the power difference a 6-core Haswell E you may get might not be worth the huge price premium. In applications that really do well with threading you'll see good gains (although I don't know if 20% really matters if it's only occasional), but for most things you won't notice the difference at all.

 

A 4790k with DDR3 would probably not be noticeably slower (and faster in games and easier to cool), and with the money you'll save you can probably get a new CPU+Mainboard+RAM down the road for the same total amount, or get a better GPU right away. You'll probably benefit from that more if you game regularly.

 

But, by all means, if you have the money and you'll spend a significant amount of time waiting for CPU-bound applications, go for Haswell E.

 

On the SSD with RAID0 thing, well, nowadays it doesn't matter much. In the past it was sometimes interesting (my laptop has 2x64GB SSDs in RAID0, it's a thing from 2010), but nowadays you just shouldn't bother.

 

What you could do for a major performance gain is get a M2 SSD (and a mainboard with a fast M2 slot). The Samsung XP941 256GB is hard to find but well worth the price and trouble. It can easily be double as fast as a SATA3 SSD. Current SSDs really hit the SATA3 bottleneck. But again, if you're not running heavily IO-bound applications you really won't notice the difference.