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Meet the browser: Microsoft Edge Next

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#1 Dingleberry San the Super

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 12:23

Microsoft Edge


One fundamental difference between Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge, the company's upcoming web browser, is that Microsoft began to integrate third-party technologies into Edge.

One of those technologies is Mozilla's asm.js which provides performance improvements for web applications that are closer to native code than standard JavaScript.

 

The current version of Microsoft Edge ships with preliminary asm.js integration that users that run recent Windows 10 builds can enable in the browser.

 

To enable the feature in Edge, type about:flags in the browser's address bar and hit enter. Scroll down until you find "Enable asm.js" and check its box to enable it.

You need to restart the browser before the changes take effect.

 

Edge with asm.js enabled performed more than 300% better in the Unity Benchmark and 200% better performance in Octane's zlib test according to Microsoft.

 

It is interesting to note that Edge without asm.js performed considerably better than the latest version of Internet Explorer 11.

 

I ran a series of benchmarks comparing Edge with asm.js to Edge without asm.js on a Windows 10 test system with an Intel Core i5-2500K CPU @ 3.30GHz, 8 Gigabyte of RAM and a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti.

Microsoft Edge got an overall score of 32403 points in the Unity Benchmark while the asm.js enabled benchmark almost doubled that score as it landed at 59068 points.

While there are sub-benchmarks where asm.js did not have an effect, Mandelbrot GPU for instance, others differed by (almost) a factor of 10.

 

 

 

unity-benchmark-with-asm.jpg unity-benchmark-no-asm.jpg

 

 

 

The overall score on Google's Octane 2.0 benchmark did not differ much between Edge with and without asm.js but the zlib performance in that benchmark needs specific mentioning as it made a huge jump from 46k to 65k. While I was not able to confirm the 200% improvement that Microsoft noticed when the company ran the benchmark, it is still an impressive gain.

 

 

How does this compare to Chrome and Firefox?

I ran the tests again this time with the most recent stable versions of Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox to see how they would perform under the same conditions and to get a better picture of Edge's performance gains.

Google Chrome scored 46503 in the Unity Benchmark while Mozilla Firefox managed to get a score of 62918 in the same benchmark.

Scores were a lot closer in Google's Octane benchmark. Google Chrome scored 29144 in the benchmark matching Microsoft's Edge's score with asm.js enabled while Firefox scored 25717.

And Internet Explorer 11? The browser came dead last in all benchmarks scoring 14678 points in the Octane benchmark and would not even fully run the Unity benchmark.

 

Outlook

 

Benchmarks are not necessarily a reflection of real-world performance but it cannot be denied that Microsoft managed to catch up to Firefox and Google Chrome which is good for everyone.

 

 

Now You: Have you tried Microsoft Edge yet?

 

 

SOURCE & Credits




#2 indospot

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 13:16

Edge has been working very well for me. I have enabled everything in the experimental flags, and the only issue I have is with Google websites, which are retarded.



#3 OP Dingleberry San the Super

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 15:52

Edge has been working very well for me. I have enabled everything in the experimental flags, and the only issue I have is with Google websites, which are retarded.

 

 

blink/webkit prefix issues?



#4 indospot

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 21:11

I don't really know. If I open my G+ notifications on youtube, it doesn't work. Adding links to posts in Blogger is very wonky. And so on.



#5 +FiB3R

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 22:52

Snappy topic title :laugh:

#6 OP Dingleberry San the Super

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 09:08

Snappy topic title :laugh:

 

 

For a snappy browser(compared to ie11) :D



#7 OP Dingleberry San the Super

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 14:49

Microsoft Details Upcoming Edge Features

 

edge.gif

 

 

The price of a browser reboot.

 

During the Twitter Q&A session, Microsoft has revealed some of the planned features that haven’t been included yet.

 

So what exactly can we expect?

 

- Password,

-bookmark,

-tabs and other data sync,

 

which they promised in a “future update”, meaning it could be either before or after it RTMs

 

- Importing favorites from other web browsers

 

- Private tabs? Coming too

 

- And yes, even a status bar is coming in a future update

 

 

When can we expect?

No one knows but Microsoft, except for one feature: gesture controls are coming post RTM.

Stay tuned.


Also BY

 

+Zlip792

 

 

ooSyWrp.png



#8 Anibal P

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 15:03

I'll give it a shot in Win 10, but I suspect it will be real good to use to download a better browser for those that are serious 



#9 OP Dingleberry San the Super

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 15:06

I'll give it a shot in Win 10, but I suspect it will be real good to use to download a better browser for those that are serious 

 

It's just a Alpha version now.

Still casual browsing works good.



#10 +Zagadka

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 17:09

Importing bookmarks as a possible future update... that is pretty unacceptable.



#11 chaosinfected

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 17:47

I'll give it a shot in Win 10, but I suspect it will be real good to use to download a better browser for those that are serious 

 

I don't know how to download Edge from Edge, so I guess I'll let the OS update it instead :D 



#12 OP Dingleberry San the Super

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 18:12

At the moment, Edge’s comparative dearth of features and bulk makes it pretty great at staying slim. It might not replace a power user’s toolbox, but it is an excellent lightweight alternative. If you have a low-powered laptop, or an older computer you share with the house, Edge may be just what you need. Only the future knows if it will stay that way, but for now, there’s a lot less bloat to deal with.

 

 

Of course, all of this is from using an unfinished preview of a product that hasn’t even finished its name change yet. If you’re a hardcore Chrome or Opera user , you probably won’t be tempted away immediately. For now, though, it does look promising. Microsoft is making an effort to add genuinely useful features to a browser that’s shedding its worst parts and starting over on a solid foundation.


Edge doesn’t add a ton of crap, but what it does add is useful.


Microsoft announced that Edge would have support for extensions out of the box, and it’s even trying to make sure developers can port their extensions as easily as possible. However, the company also isn’t waiting around for other services to make their browser useful. Here are just a few things Edge can already do:

  • Cortana is baked right in to get quick answers: Google has done some pretty neat things by adding quick answers and Google Now-like features to search, but nothing quite beats a fully integrated assistant. With Edge, you can select text and right-click to get information immediately, including definition of words, maps of addresses, or information on famous people. Unlike Google’s search, you can get that information without leaving the page or opening a new tab.

  • Annotations and reading lists remove the need for some extensions: Edge allows you to save screenshots of web pages and write notes on them. It also includes a reading list feature that lets you save articles for later. Chrome or Firefox can do this with the help of extensions, but with Edge, it’s baked right in. If you’re a dedicated Evernote or Pocket devotee, this won’t mean much for you. If you just want to save an article every now and then without having to sign up for yet another service, it’s right up your alley.

  • Reading mode strips the crap from articles: It is rage-inducing when you’re trying to read an article and giant banner ads push text down, videos fly over the page, or some rogue ad starts making noise. No one needs or likes that crap.


Bringing Asm.js to Chakra and Microsoft Edge


Microsoft officials have plans to both add to and remove from its new Windows 10 browser a number of new features and extensions.

 
msedgefeatures.jpg

This week, the Softies detailed some of the post-release-to-manufacturing (RTM) features that its Edge (formerly codenamed "Spartan") browser will be getting. On that list:

  • Extension support (including extensions for Skype Reddit and Pinterest)
  • More Cortana scenarios
  • Object RTC
  • Pointer Lock

On the feature-cut list are a number of "legacy IE technologies," including ActiveX, VBScript, and more -- resulting in the elimination of more than 220,000 lines of code in MSHTML, according to a new Microsoft blog post.


Although, the web browser still on its infancy, we can already see where Microsoft is headed with Edge, and this is just the start. While the company will continue to ship Internet Explorer mainly for compatibility, Edge (Project Spartan) will come bundled with Windows 10 as the default web browser. Also, because it's a universal app, the software will work across devices including PCs, tablets, Xbox, phones


I've been using Edge for a while now. Even though the browser still far from complete, because of the current bugs that make the software unresponsive at times and the lack of features, I like the direction Microsoft is taking.


The Microsoft Edge Dev (Beta) has a collection of demos, such as Fly Arcade game, CSS3 filters, Assasin's Creed Pirates simulation, and various other demos to showcase the web browser.


Actually, Edge is built using the former Metro thing, I mean Universal apps use the WinRT API, not Win32... So we won't have a classical 'desktop' version of Edge in Windows 10.



#13 George P

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 07:43

They're moving fast with Edge, and they've already added quite a lot of stuff to it.  Performance should be top notch if you look at the early benchmarks so far, so I don't worry about that.

 

As far as features go, this new browser team is serious IMO, so don't expect RTM in the summer and then nothing for 8 months or a year like with IE,  I'm betting we'll see at least one new version a month, and at the most once a week post RTM.



#14 OP Dingleberry San the Super

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 11:47

Microsoft details improvements of F12 Tools for Edge

#15 +T3X4S

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 11:59

OK - so what does this mean for the non-benchmark running people ?

In real world situations ?

I dont care about some synthetic test that tells me the differences are huge in milliseconds