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Newbie C++ Help


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#46 Zerosignull

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  • Joined: 30-October 01

Posted 17 November 2003 - 23:36

intersting to note that c ++ was, many moons ago, first called c with objects. C++ is an extention to C. Java is a progression from C ++ and is harder to understand for a newb then C.

C as a language is so easy that it takes some of the fun out of it. My lecturer at college used to say "if you could understand pointers then you knew the hardest bit of c" and pointers are easy to grasp if you have them explained to you properly.

c++ is a nice beast but is a beast and has lots of complicated parts to it which are good and in some situations usefull but i find i never use them. i prefere to keep code as low level and simple as possible as not to lag down code doing unneccesary work. Object Oriented program will seem alot easier to you is you have learn C's structure's, struct cast's. Memory management is easier then c's but if you programm in windows 3.0/1 then you carnt use it (doest get paged right in old version of windows).

Java after learning c++ is so quick to pick up it aint even a challenge, did my brother's university course work which had to be in jarva and ide only ever done c++.

Dont go the rounte of basic. if u can handle C/C++ then you can handle ANY language out there that is written with humans in mind. It may just be me but i like some challenge in the actually programming aspect.

Any way that just my point of view and shouldnt be set in gold..


#47 zachman123

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Posted 02 December 2003 - 23:49

yea, mostly true, but I'd say that java is EASIER than c++.... just my opinion

started up with java, starting to learn/convert over to c++

#48 lostspyder

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    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 10-October 03

Posted 02 December 2003 - 23:55

why dont you start with Qbasic. Its amazinly easy to pick up on and teches the basics realy well.

#49 super_serge

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 22:32

I just love the Primer Plus books. I have 2. C Primer Plus and C++ Primer Plus. They explain the language really well and i would suggest buying them if you have a few bucks to spend ($75 US for both). Also, I recommend learning C then C++, and then moving on to any other languages, cuz C and C++ are like the basics of programming. After you learn C++, all other languages should be a breeze. :D Hope this helped!

#50 ISSWHU

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Posted 19 December 2003 - 16:48

<c language> i think it is good book for u

#51 jugaaru

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  • Location: Toronto, Canada

Posted 29 January 2004 - 19:47

I have just started college, and we have a C programming course.
If there any good links?
How do a beginner start programming C?

#52 TaRaKa

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    Neowin 1337

  • Joined: 16-May 03
  • Location: UK, Leeds

Posted 03 February 2004 - 10:06

there are some good tutorials on Game tutorials thats where i started to learn but id recomend buying The C++ programming language bj Bjarne Stroustrup

#53 EDF

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Posted 16 March 2004 - 05:27

I am going to learn C++.

#54 XanoZuke

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Posted 25 March 2004 - 00:08

Which program do I use to write C++?

#55 jugaaru

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  • Location: Toronto, Canada

Posted 31 March 2004 - 03:38

You can try Bloodshed Dev-C++ 4.0

http://download.com....tml?tag=lst-4-4

#56 pballsim

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Posted 01 April 2004 - 22:31

Emacs baby! http://gnu.org

#57 Widdowmaker

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  • Joined: 01-May 03

Posted 23 April 2004 - 06:28

i use the bloodshed C++ compiler, i started with Qbasic in school during study hall and then moved on to VB 6.0 for a class. After that i went to the local college and signed up for a C++ class. The book we used was "Your first book of C++". Great book, teachs you all the way from cout to using vector graphics in a 3d enviorment.

#58 justin89h

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Posted 29 April 2004 - 07:17

I started making webpages using WYSIWYG editors, then started looking at the code. I went to javascript, css, then php and mysql, now im having a go at C++

I defefinetly recommend the bloodshed devc++ and winprog.org/tutorial 's windows programming tutorial.

Of course, go with web tutorials if you dont want to spend money, but if you dont mind spending, I think a book is alot easier to learn from.

#59 evil__donkey

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  • Joined: 14-May 04

Posted 14 May 2004 - 09:20

1. ASM
I'd recommend you start with 80x86 ASM. There are several good tutorials and free books out there to learn assembly language. Learning assembly language first will give you insights into the computer that you wouldn't otherwise have if you were using a high level language.

There are several assemblers that are available for free:
1. FASM (The easiest to learn and use, Linux\Win32\DOS) (www.flatassembler.net)
2. MASM (The most popular assembler, Win32\DOS) (www.masm32.com) *
3. TASM (Unsupported, Win32\DOS) (Ask Google)
4. GoAsm (A down-to-earth assembler, Win32) (www.godevtool.com)
........

Art of Assembly Language (16/32-bit), Randy Hyde, is the most comprehensive book you'll find on assembly language for the Intel 80x86 processors.
Another good book is Assembly language for the IBM PC Family, William Jones.

C:
After you've learnt a good deal of assembly language and computer architecture, get yourself a good book to learn C. K&R was good.

C++:
If you want to learn C++, I'd say you look no further than C++ Programming Black Book, Steven Holzner. Da Best!

Good luck!

_______________________
* For MASM32, if you want to assemble 16-bit programs, you might need a 16-bit linker, which you can easily download from Iczelion's Windows assembly website.

#60 Schmoove

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    I strike the empire back

  • Joined: 11-December 02
  • Location: The Netherlands

Posted 14 May 2004 - 09:25

1. ASM
I'd recommend you start with 80x86 ASM. There are several good tutorials and free books out there to learn assembly language. Learning assembly language first will give you insights into the computer that you wouldn't otherwise have if you were using a high level language.

There are several assemblers that are available for free:
1. FASM (The easiest to learn and use, Linux\Win32\DOS) (www.flatassembler.net)
2. MASM (The most popular assembler, Win32\DOS) (www.masm32.com) *
3. TASM (Unsupported, Win32\DOS) (Ask Google)
4. GoAsm (A down-to-earth assembler, Win32) (www.godevtool.com)
........

C:
After you've learnt a good deal of assembly language and computer architecture, get yourself a good book to learn C. K&R was good.

C++:
If you want to learn C++, I'd say you look no further than C++ Programming Black Book, Steven Holzner. Da Best!

_______________________
* For MASM32, if you want to assemble 16-bit programs, you might need a 16-bit linker, which you can easily download from Iczelion's Windows assembly website.

You must be kidding.....
That is just stupid to start with ASM if you have no experience. Normally you start with something easy as Pascal or Java to learn things about loops, conditions, etc, etc. Then when you know how to do the simple things you go learn Object Oriented Programming. By that time you know how to think and how a computer reacts on your statements. Now it is a good time to dive into more complicated stuff like assembly language. If you do that first you have probably no idea what the hell you are doing anyways.



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